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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a new Maverick 88 security, took it out and fired about 20 rounds of slugs and buckshot and it shot and functioned great. However after cleaning and tightening the barrel nut back on, I noticed the stock moved slightly. This is a brand new gun and the stock is loose, could this be a defect or normal? what type screwdriver removes the pad, should I use blue loctite on the bolt and what size is the bolt in the stock? Thanks for any help.
 

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old fart
Has it got a full-length stock on it or the folding stock. First of all I would contact Mossberg who I believes makes the Maverick Shotguns. The reason is not to do anything to it until you talk with them. Because by you attempting to tighten the Stock should there be an issue with the Stock Bolt or the threads in the end of the Receiver possibly damaged. By you attempting to take care of the issue your self, if it should be a factory defect that you tried to fix they might void your warranty?

But if you do it yourself, please fallow the below advise.
Should they instruct you to attempt to tighten it yourself. Please take down the person's name and contact number authorizing you to attempt to fix the issue. *That is very important.
I am assuming it is a Full-Length Stock with a Recoil Pad on it. If they allow you to attempt to tighten the Stock I woulld try a Philips Screwdriver in the Recoil Pad first. (But read the bottom of this page first!) If they would be slotted screws, You will need a smaller 1/4" wide bladed screwdriver with a smaller round screwdriver shaft. There will be a slight impression toward the Top of the Recoil Pad in the center of the Pad and another indent toward the bottom of the Recoil Pad. Where the indentations are gently insert the Smaller Screw Driever into the Rubber. Do not twist the blade when inserting it. Be sure the Blade of the Screwdriver is all the way down in the Pad and in the slot. And be sure the round Shaft of the Screwdriver is all the way down in the rubber against and in the Recoil Pad Scre Slot.
You will remove the two screws that holds the Recoil Pas on the Stock. When unscrewing it just leave the screw in the Recoil Pad. And gently remove the small screwdriver. or leave it in the Recoil Pad after loosening the last Pad Screw! You will need a much longer and larger wide bladed Screwdriver to tighten the Stock Bolt. If you totally remove the Stock put a couple of small BLUE LOCTITE on the threads and install the stock and it back on the Receiver.
Since it is a plastic stock be sure the Recoil Pad Screws align back up with the Screw Holes in the Stock so you do not strip them. And do not over tighten them when putting the Recoil Pad back on!
* The only exceptions might be if they use this type of Sock Receiver Screw. Which requires another tool to tighten it. But not likely. *Check with a flashlight to see what Stock Screw/Bolt it has!
Or they used a small Philips Screwdriver to the Recoil Pad Screws?

When you call and talk to Mossberg, they should be able tell you if they used any of the above two changes. It would be easier if they used a Phillips Screws for the Recoil Pad Screws. Simpy use a small Philips Screwdriver for the screws with the same method as mentioned above with the Slotted Screws.
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Let is know what you find out! Chances are they simply did not get the Stock tightened enough!
Good Luck and if we can be of any assistance do not hesitate to contact us.

03
 
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@old fart - welcome to the site. Please wander over to the Introductions section and tell us a bit about yourself. You will also want to familiarize yourself with this thread (it has good information on the site): So yer new here, huh?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
old fart
Has it got a full-length stock on it or the folding stock. First of all I would contact Mossberg who I believes makes the Maverick Shotguns. The reason is not to do anything to it until you talk with them. Because by you attempting to tighten the Stock should there be an issue with the Stock Bolt or the threads in the end of the Receiver possibly damaged. By you attempting to take care of the issue your self, if it should be a factory defect that you tried to fix they might void your warranty?

But if you do it yourself, please fallow the below advise.
Should they instruct you to attempt to tighten it yourself. Please take down the person's name and contact number authorizing you to attempt to fix the issue. *That is very important.
I am assuming it is a Full-Length Stock with a Recoil Pad on it. If they allow you to attempt to tighten the Stock I woulld try a Philips Screwdriver in the Recoil Pad first. (But read the bottom of this page first!) If they would be slotted screws, You will need a smaller 1/4" wide bladed screwdriver with a smaller round screwdriver shaft. There will be a slight impression toward the Top of the Recoil Pad in the center of the Pad and another indent toward the bottom of the Recoil Pad. Where the indentations are gently insert the Smaller Screw Driever into the Rubber. Do not twist the blade when inserting it. Be sure the Blade of the Screwdriver is all the way down in the Pad and in the slot. And be sure the round Shaft of the Screwdriver is all the way down in the rubber against and in the Recoil Pad Scre Slot.
You will remove the two screws that holds the Recoil Pas on the Stock. When unscrewing it just leave the screw in the Recoil Pad. And gently remove the small screwdriver. or leave it in the Recoil Pad after loosening the last Pad Screw! You will need a much longer and larger wide bladed Screwdriver to tighten the Stock Bolt. If you totally remove the Stock put a couple of small BLUE LOCTITE on the threads and install the stock and it back on the Receiver.
Since it is a plastic stock be sure the Recoil Pad Screws align back up with the Screw Holes in the Stock so you do not strip them. And do not over tighten them when putting the Recoil Pad back on!
* The only exceptions might be if they use this type of Sock Receiver Screw. Which requires another tool to tighten it. But not likely. *Check with a flashlight to see what Stock Screw/Bolt it has!
Or they used a small Philips Screwdriver to the Recoil Pad Screws?

When you call and talk to Mossberg, they should be able tell you if they used any of the above two changes. It would be easier if they used a Phillips Screws for the Recoil Pad Screws. Simpy use a small Philips Screwdriver for the screws with the same method as mentioned above with the Slotted Screws.
View attachment 259435
View attachment 259437
Let is know what you find out! Chances are they simply did not get the Stock tightened enough!
Good Luck and if we can be of any assistance do not hesitate to contact us.

03
I got the stock off, I was able to do it without much effort with a large slotted screwdriver. It can also be removed with a 1/2 socket and I will use this to reinstall but only snug it up. The bolt and receiver look good and I guess either the shots loosened it or it wasn't real tight from factory. Thanks
 

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Yes they simply did not have it tight enough. And Slugs and 00 Buck will work on a gun!
And your shoulder after a while.
You may want to use the two small drops of BLUE Loctite on the threads. Do not use any other color!
Glad it is working out for you! Just for information were the Recoil Pad Screws Slotted or Philips?

03
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes they simply did not have it tight enough. And Slugs and 00 Buck will work on a gun!
And your shoulder after a while.
You may want to use the two small drops of BLUE Loctite on the threads. Do not use any other color!
Glad it is working out for you! Just for information were the Recoil Pad Screws Slotted or Philips?

03
Philips and they were silver, most in the past were black.
 

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@old fart - my apologies. You've been around longer than most. I don't know why I thought you were new.

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@OldFart, I have a Maverick made in the early 80's that was used as a "cop gun". Before I had it gone through by a gunsmith it looked like it had been through a train wreck but today, it looks and runs like new. Maverick 88's are made on the Mexican side of the El Paso border and are just as good and a lot cheaper than the other Mossbergs.

Mossberg makes the best pump shotgun IMO. The internals of mine really didn't need to be gone thru the gunsmith told me. I spent very few bucks to make a hellacious looking gun brand new looking and functioning. It's a great SD gun. Ask those 4 kids that got shot at by the 80 y.o. that shot one of them in L.A. with a shotgun.
 

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old fart.
Yes, it is much better when they use Philips Screws for the Recoil Pads. Since most all Philips Screwdriver have a round shaft, they will not tear the rubber on the Pad up when you are turning the screws out and in. So, thanks, it is good to know that Mossberg is using Philips Screws to attach their Recoil Pads.

03
 
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