Mauser 98 broken safety

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing Forum' started by Ryel, Oct 1, 2010.

  1. Ryel

    Ryel New Member

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    Hi Folks,
    I have a Mauser 98 chambered in .308 Win that I haven’t used in over ten years. I pulled it out to clean and oil but the safety would not flip up to vertical much less over to safe. Lots of penetrating fluid and manual back and forth over the last three days but I finally broke the lever off the safety. It’s a custom after market thing with very little metal but I broke it. Then the safety fell out of the bolt so I took a scrap of 3/4 X 1/8 mild steel, weld it onto the safety and began working it again. I can get it up to vertical now but only just…problem is the bolt is still locked in the breech. I have ordered a new Timney M98 safety from Brownells but I cannot get the bolt disassembled. Can you talk me through what I need to understand about this bolt to get it working correctly?
    Thanks
    Ryel
     
  2. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Welcome to the forum. Stop by our "Introductions" section when you can.

    Take a look at some of the on-line auctions for a replacement bolt. Sometimes it is easier to replace than to fix. It sounds like something other than rust is not working correctly.
     

  3. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Well-Known Member

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    If the bolt is still stuck in the receiver you're best course of action is to take it to a smith. Disassembling the bolt once removed is easy. Simply unscrew the striker from the bolt body, then push with the tip of the firing pin while holding the shroud and you'll be able to remove/reinstall the new safety.
     
  4. Ryel

    Ryel New Member

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    Correct me if I am wrong, but my understanding is that the original design requires the safety to be in the vertical position and cocked before the bolt sleeve can be unscrewed. I have attempted to unscrew it with the safety in the left (off) position and failed to get it past “un-cocked”. Did I just not try hard enough? There is something about what the retaining pin does that I don't understand.
    Thanks
    Ryel
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2010
  5. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Well-Known Member

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    The safety holds the striker back. You can still unscrew it by pushing down on the sear notch sticking out the bottom of the bolt against the edge of a bench and unscrewing while holding the striker back.
     
  6. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    I'm not clear on where you are at exactly, so I'll ask....

    1) Is the bolt still in the receiver or not?

    2) If it is still in the receiver - can you open and close the bolt as you normally would?

    3) If you can open the bolt, did you hold out on the bolt release lever (left side of the receiver) before trying to pull the bolt out of the receiver?

    The devil is in the details. ;)
     
  7. Ryel

    Ryel New Member

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    1) Is the bolt still in the receiver or not? The bolt can be cocked and removed

    2) If it is still in the receiver - can you open and close the bolt as you normally would?
    Yes, it can be opened and closed...until I attempt to raise the safety to vertical, at which point the bolt becomes locked

    3) If you can open the bolt, did you hold out on the bolt release lever (left side of the receiver) before trying to pull the bolt out of the receiver?

    the bolt release lever is not a issue...the problem is getting the Bolt Sleeve to unscrew without the safety in the vertical position. One gentleman has offered that I don't need the safety to be in the vertical but so far I have failed to get the Bolt Sleeve to unscrew, thereby dis-assembly of the bolt.

    so I remain confused.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2010
  8. Ryel

    Ryel New Member

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    Thank you for the feedback but you are using terms that I don't understand.
    by "sear notch" are you referencing what the following site calls "the retaining pin on the bolt sleeve" in figure 6?
    Collecting and Shooting the Mauser Rifle - Bolt Disassembly and Reassembly

    I do appreciate your trying to help. I know it's much easier with the rifle in hand.
     
  9. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    OK, I just wasn't sure if you got the bolt out of the gun or not. :eek:

    Two things need to happen before you can unscrew the bolt sleeve (1) from the bolt body (6). The firing pin needs to be in the "cocked" position and held there. As stalkingbear pointed out, once the bolt is cocked - putting the safety in the vertical position will hold it that way so that it cannot become "un-cocked". In your case, it sounds like your broken safety isn't able to perform as it normally would.

    The sear notch that Mr. bear is talking about is the V-shaped lug that hangs from the bottom of the cocking sleeve (2). If you place the forward edge of that lug against the edge of a table and pull downward on the bolt body, you can pull the firing pin back into the "cocked" position. It is a fairly strong spring in there so it will take some effort.

    What you can then do is pull the cocking sleeve back far enough to where you can slip a coin in between the front of the cocking sleeve and the rear of the bolt sleeve. The coin will then hold the firing pin in the cocked position, instead of your broken safety.

    [​IMG]

    At that point you should be able to depress "the retaining pin on the bolt sleeve" in figure 6 and disassemble your bolt. You will never be able to turn the bolt shroud (fully) with the bolt "un-cocked".

    Is that any help?
     
  10. Ryel

    Ryel New Member

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    Thanks for the "penny in the action" trick. Works like a charm. Now the bolt is apart and I can put the new safety on.

    One more question:
    While looking through Brownells list of 98 bolt parts there is an aftermarket spring/fireingpin that claims it's light weight/strong spring gives better chamber response with less cartridge movement.

    do you have any opinions on that claim?
    thanks
     
  11. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    Disclaimer:
    I am not a professional gunsmith nor do I play one on TV. :)

    In my amateur opinion, :eek: that would be an issue with the chamber being concentric with the bore and head spacing rather than the mainspring and firing pin. Do I think a heavier mainspring and lighter firing pin will decrease lock time? Yes I do. In fact, I run a lightweight hammer and titanium firing pin in my match AR15. It definitely helps to improve my off-hand scores.

    I don't believe the majority of people will notice any benefit in a hunting rifle however. Well..... maybe if you are shooting hunter class bench rest competition perhaps. Other than that, it's probably just a waste of money for most folks. Again -- just my personal opinion which is worth absolutely nothing.
     
  12. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Well-Known Member

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    I'm inclined to agree with Highpower-you're not going to tell the difference on locktime. Decreased locktime is the only benefit it would offer and not enough so that you would notice.
     
  13. Ryel

    Ryel New Member

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    Thanks
    one more question: when I attempt to screw the firing pin assembly, after three revolutions into the bolt body it feels like I am hitting solid steel and it will not go past this point. Looking at the gap makes me believe it still has a few more threads to go. Yep, three turns in and 3 threads to go. It is cocked and held up by the safety. Pushing in the retaining pin doesn't seem to have any effect.

    Apparently it has something to do with the new safety....when the penny is holding it everything works fine. and what is happening inside that collar to stop the thing from screwing in?
    OK, now i am confused. with my new $52 safety I can be on safe or ready to fire but I cannot dis-assemble or re-assemble.
    OK...the new safety only has one side ground off instead of both which leaves a flat shank. when I open the bolt the safety rotates off which tells me something inside the collar is moving.
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2010
  14. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    Yes, the safety interacts with the cocking/bolt sleeves and will need to be hand fit in order to work properly in your bolt. That is something best handled by a professional gunsmith like stalkingbear. And for the record, I don't discuss the use of Dremel tools on these forums. ;)
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2010