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Sheriifjohn, Sir - I'm touched by your faith in my knowledge of older guns, prolly because I'm often old enough to remember when they were brought into service, but I'll do my poor best, and crave your indulgence.

Now, back to the anonymous 'parachutist'

First of all, perhaps I should have answered your rather abrupt question - 'Anyone have any information on this' ( note lack of punctuation and brusqueness) with a simple 'yes'.

But then I bethought me of it, and decided that that might have seemed rude and unwelcoming.

Anyhow, I'm thinking, right now, that it is a civilian action made by Braendlin Armoury Co. of Birmingham. The odd-looking stamp is the Martini trademark and the flags and B are those of Braendlin.

It's likely a civilian contract model - that curly op lever and outlined engraving, plus the very old Brandlin Armoury Co of Birmingham mark makes that more than likely. Military Martini actions had a wealth of stamps, but none looked like any of those. Crowns over VR, for a start, and RSAF Enfield.

Braendlin was at one time arguably the largest Brit commercial manufacturer of Martinis with many of the high-end sporters and volunteer rifles of the era starting life as one of their actions. Most often you just find just their little logo without the full name spelled out, leaving the final retailer to mark it as they wished. Their later contract rifles/carbines such as are coming out of Afghanistan are the exception, with their company name appearing on the receiver.

From those I’ve seen, fit, finish and material are on par or better than Enfield….which of course was producing for the troops and not the trade. The widespread practice between all the manufacturers of using the same parts for military, trade and high-end commercial production resulted in a high level of uniformity in quality between the various Brit manufacturers.

The sole practical difference between an Enfield and a Braendlin is its status as a collectable. The Brit issued Enfield or contract rifles of any given style are in general going to bring a higher value than any of the commercial counterparts that were not Brit military issued. This is a matter or history and perception that have no bearing on the quality of the arm or its desirability as a shooter. I’d say that the only other difference worth mentioning is who maintained them. The Braendlin-made contract carbin es can take a lot of work and effort to get back in shape as a result of having been used well after the availability of a Brit trained armorer to maintain and repair. Again this has nothing to do with the basic quality of the arm, only how it has been used/maintained over the past century or so.

Looks like your needs a few parts to make it work. Good luck with that.

PS - Maybe I should say 'welcome' at this point, but you've just parachuted in on my evening nap, posted images at a screwy viewing angle and not said a single word of hello, here I am, my name is Alphonse and I'm a gun nut et al. As a result, I'll let the people who run this fine and friendly site comment while I go back to sleep - just noting that if I'd have arrived like you did, I likely wouldn't be here now.

Things sure have gotten a deal softer in the last few years.
 

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I know I'm not alone when I say thank you to Tac Foley for your interest in this forum. There appears to be a renewed interest in British firearms - at least in my limited circle - especially SMLE type rifles. Jungle carbines are showing up for some reason at very high prices (at least to me they're pricey). We're also seeing more of the Nepal martinis offered recently. Tac has always been willing to help us. Thanks!
 

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This is the collected wisdom from my friends over on gunboards.com, to whom I am often very grateful.


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tacfoley2
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Discussion Starter · #1 · 12 h ago


Tool Wood Auto part Metal Nickel



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staffy
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#2 · 12 h ago

IIRC - the crossed flags with B is the Braendlin Armoury Co, Birmingham, UK.

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Clyde
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#3 · 9 h ago

And looks to be a Mark IV style, sort of, and intended for sporting use. Note short lever.

Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

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john.k
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#4 · 9 h ago

It the typical Belgian style with rear safety lever ........The strange wavy trademark at the front is likely the makers mark.....Braendlin was almost exclusively a Belgian vendor.......Braendlin himself was a long time veteran of the Belgian firearms industry ,and it appears he was financed by Tranter ,who owned the buildings Braendlin operated from.......later Greeners owned the business.


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fred2892
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#5 · 8 h ago

The strange wavy mark at the front is the martini patent mark to indicate royalties were paid upon manufacture.


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DoubleD
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#6 · 8 h ago

The stylized wavy line M is the Martini trademark, The cross flags and B as displayed are as used by Greener after they acquired Braendlin.

I have never heard Braendlin referred to in this sense. He may have been indeed a Vendor of Belgian products, Wal Winfer alludes to a large trade with the cottage industry of Belgium by British Gun Makers. But I can find no references show a strong connect by Braendlin to Belgium. Even the Braendlin-Albini popular in Belgium was of an English design

Clyde nota MK IV copy, very different.

Douglas

"And don't forget. That isn't your Martini you have. It belonged to others before you and will belong to others after you are gone. Look after it, and pass it on with pride. It deserves it." Malcolm Cobb, The Martini Henry Note-book
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To find things Martini go to: WWW.MartiniHenry.com

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DisasterDog
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#7 · 8 h ago

DoubleD said:
Clyde nota MK IV copy, very different.
More like a Cadet style, would be interesting to know dimensions.

"A noble spirit embiggens the smallest man.".
- Jebediah Springfield

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john.k
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#8 · 7 h ago

These Belgian Martinis Ive seen come in three sizes ,small cadet size,a mid size which oddly is not common,and the large size like the Greener shotgun.......There are always NOS action bodies on sale on euro ebay ,for not much ,if you are keen on making your own .
 
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