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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well i have an old marlin .38 revolver top break double action, and i like to know more about it. On the top of the barrel it says its patented on august 3, 1887; and on the bottom of the handle it has 807, a serial im guessing. I found it in an old cigar box in pieces, i cleaned it up and put most of it together, but some of the internal pieces are missing. I'd like to find out what pieces i need and how they go together, and also i didnt know marlin made revolvers so maybe a lil history about the gun? So can you guys help me?
 

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Wish I could help but hey thanks for the cool info I never knew Marlin made handguns either .

Shame they didn't stay at it .
 

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Even Winchester and Remington (briefly) made handguns. Please note yours was LIKELY made for black powder cartridges, and should NOT be fired with current day ammo. If you can find a copy of Flayderman's Guide to Antique American Firearms, it shows a half dozen or so. I especially like the Marlin "Little Joker".
 

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Many early Marlin revolvers were rimfires and, yes, black powder only. Collectable for sure. Expensive/valuable? Probably not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yah i know its old, ive figured out more about within hte past day, its a marlin model 1887, they made around 15,000 of them between 1887 and 1899. I found it at my grandpas and i want 2 get it workin as a suprize for him, the bore and the cylinder are flawless and should be able 2 shoot when i get all the parts, as for the ammo my grandfather has tons of old ammo and reloading supplies as he was once a gunsmith.
 

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Marlin did indeed make a line of custom brand revolvers, these with hardware store brand names, some not identified at all. Most were .32 or .38 S&W caliber, and surprisingly well made.

Several years ago a friend of mine brought one to me that had the habit of jumping open with each shot. I couldn't weld, but he could, so I showed him what had to be done to build up the frame's locking lugs with weld metal. He did this and I filed the lugs down to original profile. He then asked me to make him a pair of oversize stocks of walnut, and I did this. The gun was in good condition, and nickeled plated. With the new walnut grips, it looked fairly nice, and shot reasonable well out to about twenty five yards.

A secretary where he worked persuaded him to lend her the gun for protection. She shot and killed hersel with that gun. Last I saw of it.

Bob Wright
 
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