MacAthur???

Discussion in 'History' started by TLuker, Jun 27, 2012.

  1. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    I'm just curious as to what the consensus is on MacAthur as a General? I've always heard what a great general he was, but I've never figured out what that was based on? What exactly did he do to earn so much praise?
     

  2. willshoum

    willshoum New Member

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    Praise.....

    He coined the phrase " I Shall Return "
     
  3. alsaqr

    alsaqr Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Few folks are familiar with MacArthurs early Army history. MacArthur was recommended for the Medal of Honor in an action against Mexico in 1914. It was not awarded on a technical point. MacArthur was awarded two Distinguished Service Crosses and seven Silver Stars while serving as a Colonel in the 42nd Division in WWI. He was CG of the 42nd Division for the last two days of the war.

    MacArthur was awarded a third Distinguised Service Cross and a Medal of Hornor for WWII.

    MacArthur seldom wore his ribbons and decorations.
     
  4. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    That's sort of my point. What other general in history is famous for leaving his soldiers and his command? And he got a CMH for that?

    In my opinion Patton was an arrogant ass, but brilliant.
    MacArthur was just an arrogant ass. The most I can say for him was he had a knack for theatrics. Someone please correct me if I'm missing something.
     
  5. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    Thanks, that really improved my opinion of him.
     
  6. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Having already put a rather distiguished career behind him, he retired- and was recalled to active duty just prior to the start of WW 2. His command in the Phillipines was under manned and under equipped, yet it held on fighting far beyond any expectation. THAT was what got him the Medal, not his leaving when ordered to do so. It was his strategy that carried the Allies island to island and onto Japan's doorstep.

    After the surrender, he served as Military Governor of Japan. When Korea was invaded in 1950, he was the commander of UN Forces in Korea. Look up Inchon Landings.
     
  7. yayamamasami

    yayamamasami New Member

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    He was ordered to conduct a tactical withdrawal by President Roosevelt. They knew the forces in the Phillipines could not withstand the Japanese onslaught at that time. It would have hurt the US on many levels if Mac had been captured. Sometimes a soldier has to do what a soldier has to do.
     
  8. michigan0626

    michigan0626 New Member

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    He was ordered by the president to leave the Philippines to Australia. His "I shall return" line was him telling the Filipino people that someday he will return to their nation. His did ceremoniously return. He was given their Legion of Honor. He is still revered in the Philippines.
     
  9. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    the thing is he was ordered to leave. really not like he had a choice in the matter. if i remember correctly he even went as high as the president, to plead his case for staying in the Phillipines. so it wasn't as though he was running away willingly, but if anything wanted to stay and support the Filipino people in resisting the Japanese army.
     
  10. willshoum

    willshoum New Member

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    Military genius......

    When all is said and done, Mac was doomed to fail, There is no war for ever......Eventually those that oppose war will win.....To feed those that love war will have to go back to the plow some day......Go a head an slap a soldier in the head and call him a coward, no not mac. Every man has his breaking point......I don't recall that sob apologizing for what happened in the phillapines.....scuse my english......:mad:
     
  11. linuxuser3890

    linuxuser3890 New Member

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    He was so great mainly because he was from my state. And all that other stuff him and his father accomplished.
     
  12. willshoum

    willshoum New Member

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    And so were thousands before and after him.....Medals do not make the man, Only those that refuse said medals in honour of thier fallen comrades do you see a mans true worth......Yea, my father recieved a silver star for bravery under fire, he came home with a cigar box FULL of medals.....He thru them all in the bayou, seems that six years of his life wasn't enough for uncle sam.......As for island hopping and killing the Japs, it was a waste of men and machinery, we could have starved the basterds to death on those same islands,.......:mad:
     
  13. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    I understand that MacArthur was sent to the Phillipines with an impossible task before the Japaneses invasion and that he was ordered out. I'm not saying that he did a bad job by any means, but I wouldn't call it a success either. He did his job and got paid very well for it (by the U.S. and the Phillipines). I just don't think his job was worthy of praise, or rather any more praise than so many others in WWII?

    I would probably think better of him if he had said "We shall return"?

    As for Korea, he didn't seem to have any problems disobeying orders there?

    But that's just my opinion. :)
     
  14. Rentacop

    Rentacop New Member

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    Anyone who wants to know about MacArthur should read, American Caesar by William Manchester : http://www.amazon.com/American-Caesar-Douglas-MacArthur-1880/dp/0316024740 . It is also out on CD .

    MacArthur bears no responsibility for leaving the Phillipines because he acted under orders from the President . He does bear responsibilty for his air force being caught bunched up on the ground and destroyed .
    He is unequalled as a strategist and his personal acts of courage are astounding . MacArthur learned from his mistakes ; after Los Negros, he never again launched a frontal attack on prepared Japanese. At Bougainville, he cordoned off half the Island, stranding 300,000 Japanese troops . He let Japanese forces wither on the vine before attacking them . His casualties for the whole war were less than America suffered in The Battle of the Bulge .

    He critisized Nimitz's command for employing ultraconservative tactics in an obsession to drive the Japanese off of Okinawa . Iwo Jima was also a Nimitz show .
    MacArthur said allied strategy in Europe was terrible ; that the allies attacked one enemy strongpoint after another .
    Landing at Inchon was pure brilliance but later he dangerously divided his forces on the approach to China .

    Too bad he wasn't elected President . As I said, read Manchester's book .
     
  15. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    it's rather easy for some to sit back many years later and criticise the decisions made by those actually there and having to make those decisions.

    no leader of men is perfect and they like any other human being, makes wrong decisions just like anyone else. a good leader learns from their mistakes and doesn't repeat them.

    in the heat of battle and overwhelming odds against you, are you for sure that you would make the right choices? i am sure this is what must go through the mind of a leader of men who he is charge of trying to do the best he can with what he has.

    some become failures for history to criticise and are examples of what not to do, and some become heroes for us to set upon pedistols for us to honor.
     
  16. HockaLouis

    HockaLouis New Member

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    He lived with his mother. She even stayed at the hotel when he went to West Point! His worst decision was to force the M-1 Garand to be a .30-06 instead of the .276 Pedersen which I think we'd STILL be using in the military today if he hadn't screwed that up. Imagine lighter, smaller ammo and a lighter, shorter, 10-round Garand that would basically have performed like a .308. WWII and Korea: opportunity missed. So sad...
     
  17. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    though the 276 Pederson might have been a better cartridge with better ballistics, i was not just MacArthur who made the choice, but also Adjutant General John B. Shuman who speaking for the Sec. of War Department, orderd all work stopped on the 276 and all energies expended into identifying and correcting the deficiencies of the 30 cal.

    given the large stocks of 30 cal ammo they already had, from using the Springfield 1903 rifles, was MacArthur's reason for wanting to go with the 30 cal. vs. the 276. from a logistics point, this made much better sense than trying to field another caliber.
     
  18. Zombiegirl

    Zombiegirl New Member

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    I am interviewing at a school next week named after MacArthur. Maybe this is a sign that I should pursue it...... Interesting info btw.