m16 bcg?

Discussion in 'AR-15 Discussion' started by kiabe1, Oct 9, 2013.

  1. kiabe1

    kiabe1 New Member

    587
    0
    0
    Are there adverse effects when using a m16 bolt carrier group in a semi auto ar15
     
  2. Dahamp2003

    Dahamp2003 New Member

    262
    0
    0
    No. Just refers to the carrier shroud being full profile. Little heavier and I guess supposed to last longer.
     

  3. sweeper22

    sweeper22 New Member

    2,706
    0
    0
    Nope.

    Just a heavier, hardier option that can slow down the cyclying just enough to smooth things out a bit, reduce wear, and promote faster and more controlled follow-up shots...especially when parlayed with a mid-length gas system.

    Don't buy a good BCG. Buy a great one. Why? Because it's a truly critical part, and they happen to be abundant and affordable at the moment. When on sale (frequently of late), you can get a really excellent one (not the 8620) from PSA for $100-150.
     
  4. JonM

    JonM Moderator

    20,110
    15
    38
    The bcg is the heart of the ar platform. I use bcm bcg for just about everything. An m16 style carrier is a plus as it brings it closer to performing as designed. Lightening the carrier group as you find in low mass or civilian cut carriers can cause fail to feed from not having enough mass to forcefully strip ammunition from the magazine or cycle so fast it can cause magazine feed issues because the mag spring may nit be able to keep up.

    Highly recommend m16 carriers. Less of a head ache to diagnose and setup since all you need is to find milspec springs buffers etc to go with
     
  5. Quentin

    Quentin New Member

    7,551
    1
    0
    I also only use full M16 carriers. Like JonM said, why not go with what the design originally calls for, to aid in reliable operation. The only exception I can think of is the old Colt lower receiver with a steel block that requires a half moon carrier.
     
  6. fsted2a

    fsted2a Active Member

    1,639
    0
    36
    To be redundant, M16 carriers help balance the action as their added weight reduces (you won't notice it) the cyclic rate of fire. Also, more contact surface makes for a smoother action altogether. Like others, all I use are M16 carriers. They also are suppose to negate the carrier tilt (I think that is an urban legend because I haven't seen any evidence of it) in piston systems. The advantage is more prevalent in shorter barrel AR's, as their cyclic rate of fire is higher than their 20 inch barrel counterpart. I can't think of one mechanical disadvantage to having an M16 carrier. As long as you don't have any full auto fire control parts, you shouldn't run into any issues with the ATF.
     
  7. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,380
    1
    0
    If you have a Colt with the lower receiver block, you cannot use the M-16 carrier w/o milling the carrier or block.

    Current trend is toward the heavier M-16 carriers. Weight gain is small. If you already have a Semi-Auto carrier, save a hundred bucks and just get a heavier buffer. Most will never need the Auto carrier and a heavy buffer will be fine.
     
  8. fsted2a

    fsted2a Active Member

    1,639
    0
    36
    Question Robocop:
    As I am not familiar with the different buffer weights, is there any disadvantage to using the heavier buffer along with an M16 carrier? My general practice is to just buy the buttstock assembly with the buffer and buffer tube included, so I usually don't concern myself with different buffer weights, but in the event it became an issue, I want to have as much knowledge as possible.
     
  9. kbd512

    kbd512 Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

    2,725
    66
    48
    A M-16 bolt carrier in a semi-auto AR-15 makes the operation a tad smoother because the extra weight helps to retard the unlocking of the bolt (which is what makes the operation smoother) a little bit. There are no adverse affects from running a M-16 bolt in a semi-auto AR-15 that I know of, apart from arbitrary, as in made-up, legal issues that may arise in certain parts of the country that are run by sissy liberal bed wetters.
     
  10. Quentin

    Quentin New Member

    7,551
    1
    0
    The main problem of a heavy buffer is that lower power ammo may not cycle reliably or lock the bolt back on the last shot. A 16" barrel with carbine length gas and M16 carrier probably will work well with the H2 buffer, maybe even the H3 if way overgassed. If midlength gas then the H buffer likely is ideal, some work with H2. Most carbines come with the standard weight buffer but it doesn't hurt to experiment a bit with a heavier buffer.