M1 Garand Springfield Armory Rifle $1059 ??

Discussion in 'Curio & Relic Discussion' started by rangeshooter, Feb 9, 2010.

  1. rangeshooter

    rangeshooter New Member

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    Saw an ad on American Rifleman/Outdoor Channel a month ago. This company?? was selling refurbished M1 Garands. I lost the company's name but think I've found it: Atlantic Firearms. they are completely rebuilt, stripped down, all parts are repaired or replaced, tested, new barrels, new stocks, etc. $1059. I have been wanting to "step out of the box" and buy something I can be really proud of owning (not like I don't like what I have), but something that is historical. Is this an OK price for one that is not original but rebuilt. Is there any information ABOUT THIS GUN that I should be thinking twice about? Any help once again appreciated. Thank you. PS I've read so much about this WWII rifle, Patton's words,etc. Also, is Atlantic Firearms very well known/legitimate/etc.

    M1 Garand Springfield Armory Rifle for Sale Atlantic Firearms.com
     
  2. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Well, some likes chocolate, some likes strawberry- but have you looked at the M1 Garands from the Dept of Civilian Marksmanship? Go to ODCMP.com. Only way I know of for a NON-FFL holder to legally get a rifle mailed to your door.
     

  3. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    Agreed. If you want something "historical" get thee into a service grade Garand. It will be the genuine article, and for LESS money.

    M1 Garand Sales
     
  4. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Buy a service grade M1 Garand from CMP. Buy the real deal, not a factory remanufactured rifle.

    Here's a link: M1 Garand Sales

    Here's a pic of mine. It came from CMP it was a "Service Grade" rifle. It's a Springfield manufactured in 1943. It was arsenal rebarreled at some point with a Buffalo barrel and it has a Winchester trigger group. It's reliable and consistently accurate and it shoots better than I can. It's built like a tank and has real history.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. lynxpilot

    lynxpilot New Member

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    If you're not interested in 'correctness', i.e. that each replacement part was an official armory repair or replacement, CMP offers 'Special Grade', which has new wood and a new barrel. The stamp is the CMP stamp on the wood. All of the action is original stuff and is inspected, repaired, replaced as necessary, and reparkerized. I'll let you know in about a month what they're like. I'll leave it to the historians to advertise the other grades.
     
  6. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    CMP Service Grade will get you a clean, shootable M1. You can step up in grade and price and get prettier and more "correct" grade rifles.

    If you want it just for a shooter, Service Grade is all you need. If you want a bit more of the purist angle, step up a bit. Either way, you will get an excellent rifle and a piece of history.
     
  7. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    Is there an echo in here? :confused:
     
  8. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Hey, I'm old. ;)
     
  9. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    LOL! I just thought it was funny! Posted one minute apart, and almost word for word.....

    Guess it's true. Great minds DO think alike! :D
     
  10. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    I also purchased my Garand (service grade) from CMP. It is a little bit of a hassle to get all of the requirements met to have one delivered directly to you but it's well worth it in the end. I was very pleased with the condition of my rifle when it arrived and all of the accessories that came with it.

    You cannot beat the price either. Many of the ones you see at the gunshows that are soo overpriced have come from CMP originally (which is frowned upon by the CMP).

    One last point: It's pretty hard to find a M1 that has all of it's parts "matching" so to speak since most of them went through the arsenal's at least once during their active service lives. Having one that's got all of the same manufactures parts, i.e.: Sprinfield, H&R etc.. is what your really hoping to get.
     
  11. bigbad-ratman

    bigbad-ratman New Member

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    I hate that I have been wanting one myself, find the means to do so; and just can't afford it right now. ARRRGGGGG!!! And from the looks of the site it looks like they are drying up kinda quick like.
     
  12. TXnorton

    TXnorton New Member

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    I was going to go the CMP route for my M1 acquisition. I have seen a few of their rifles at the local range, and they looked brand new, really nice.

    Then I found a VERY nice M1 locally for just a bit more money than the CMP option. The one I bought locally was in really great shape, late 1941 manufacture with a 1947 re-barrel, near new bore and the action looked untouched since the arsenal re-build. I am more satisfied with this M1 as it has a more direct connection to WW2 service than a CMP rifle would have had.
     
  13. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    One mention of CMP- IF you have a military ID, (active, reserve, retired) you have just met the "engaged in shooting sports" requirement. IF you are a commissioned officer, you have just met the "proof of citizenship" requirements, since only a US citizen can hold a commission. Shortens up the paperwork somewhat. Got that direct from the CMP folks.
     
  14. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    What he said. ^^^^^^^^^

     
  15. Laufer

    Laufer New Member

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    My goal is to buy one this summer in Anniston (in person). Guys at local Memphis/Jackson TN gun shows try to sell very similar nice M-1s for about $900-1,000, but don't know which CMP category etc they would fit into.

    Have read and heard that they limit ammo sales, to try to prevent scalping.
    Will they sell somebody 500 rounds?

    Am doing my very first reloading (only Prvi .303 right now) and would like to 'advance' to the 30-06, as their correct GI ammo has boxer primers. Have read about shattered op rods and shattered Garands (saw a photo of a gun in six pieces: the owner bought a stranger's reloads for it, sold by a store...)
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2010
  16. Dcomf

    Dcomf New Member

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    Honestly, the CMP could care less what you did with it after it was in your grubby hands. They want the money from the sales, plain and simple. When it was the DCM they had a policy of one rifle per person period. Last I checked you could buy 8 per year. Quite a turn around of policy.
     
  17. Dcomf

    Dcomf New Member

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    Here is how the CMP grades their rifles, directly from their site. Take a throat gauge and muzzle gauge and do your own checking when you go.


    RACK GRADE: (Fair)
    Rack Grade Rifles. Most of these rifles have been refinished or rebuilt at least once while in military service and will likely have some parts from other manufacturers. Rifle wear will be exhibited by worn and mixed colors of the finish; there may be some minor pitting on the metal parts; wood will be basically sound but may be well used with minor hairline cracks, poor fit, and many dings, scratches and gouges; wood may not match in color, type of wood or condition. These rifles may have some foreign parts and wood may be Walnut, Birch, Beech or other variety. Rifles do not have import marks. Bores will be generally good with only minor imperfections; the barrel crown may be nicked, and the muzzle may gauge more than “3” on muzzle gauge. The Throat Erosion will gauge more than “5”The overall appearance and condition of the rack grade will generally be rougher than any other grade. Fair condition.

    Manufacturer selection only guarantees the receiver was produced by the manufacturer listed. The barrel and the other parts may have been produced by other manufacturers.

    FIELD GRADE: (Fair to Good)
    Field Grade Rifles. Most of these rifles have been refinished or rebuilt at least once while in military service and will likely have some parts from other manufacturers. Fair to good condition. Rifle wear will be exhibited by worn and mixed colors of the finish; there may be some minor pitting on the metal parts; wood will be basically sound but may be well used with minor hairline cracks, and many dings, scratches and gouges; wood may not match in color, type of wood or condition. These rifles may have some foreign parts and wood may be Walnut, Birch, Beech or other variety. Rifles do not have import marks. Bores will be generally good with only minor imperfections; the barrel crown may be nicked, and the muzzle may gauge more than “3” on muzzle gauge. The Throat Erosion will gauge less than 5 – well within US Army standards. Do not expect rifles in mint condition in this grade.

    Manufacturer selection only guarantees the receiver was produced by the manufacturer listed. The barrel and the other parts may have been produced by other manufacturers.

    SERVICE GRADE: (Good to Very Good)
    Service Grade Rifles show less wear and better appearance than Field or Rack Grades. Good to very good condition. Rifle wear will be exhibited by worn and mixed colors of the parkerized finish. There may be some minor pitting on the metal parts. Wood will be either Walnut, Birch, Beech or other variety and will be basically sound but may have minor hairline cracks, dings, scratches and gouges. Wood may not match in color or type of wood. Wood may be of new production on Service Grade Garands. Bores will be generally good with only minor imperfections. The barrel crown may be nicked, but the muzzle will gauge less than 3 and the throat erosion will gauge less than 5.

    Manufacturer selection only guarantees the receiver was produced by the manufacturer listed. The barrel and the other parts may have been produced by other manufacturers.

    CORRECT GRADE: (Very Good to Excellent)
    Correct Grade Rifles are similar to the Service Grade (above), but will show less wear and use. Correct Grade rifles will have all correct parts for the date of manufacture with 80% or better overall original metal finish. The stock and handguards will be of walnut and correct for the rifle but will have some dings, dents, scratches and marring of the wood finish. Stocks will have the appropriate original inspector's cartouche. The rifle bore will be very good with no significant defects and with a throat erosion of less than 4 and a muzzle wear of 2 or less. Very good to excellent condition. Limited quantities are occasionally available. Prices start at $950.
     
  18. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    No limits on ammunition purchases at this time that I am aware of.

     
  19. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    Not really a 'turn around' of policy, rather a different policy. The old DCM program was conducted by the US Army. It has since been turned over to the CMP which is a private corporation. New owners - new rules. The goal remains the same. The promotion of civilian marksmanship, with the main emphasis on junior programs.
     
  20. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    Thank you for setting it straight for me. It always bothered me to see these rifles at shows and on he auction houses blatently saying they were CMP purchased and that no one seemed concerned about it. I just hate the markup on them. I paid $475 for mine from CMP and it was much better than the $800+ junk I'm seeing at the shows.

    Thanks again Dcomf