M1 Garand help

Discussion in 'Curio & Relic Discussion' started by hoganfireman, Oct 19, 2012.

  1. hoganfireman

    hoganfireman New Member

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    I've taken the fist step in identifying my M1, contacting the cmp and requesting the cmp cert letter. I've looked up my receiver serial number and barrel number. which by the way is far from being shot out. Both match 8/44. I've ordered from ebay the scott duff book to match the rest of the drawing numbers. what I need help with is this "rack number".

    ForumRunner_20121019_074904.jpg

    Are there any vets out there who can help me with this. All of my research points out that this may have been in an armory stateside or overseas and may have never seen real action. It could have been assigned to a motor pool, kitchen etc, or even a boot camp range rifle. Any help would be great.
     
  2. crazycharlie2

    crazycharlie2 New Member

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    Aug.,1962, Co.B,1st Bn, 1st Tng Rgt. U.S. Army, Ft. Jackson, S.C. we had no such stenciling on the butt stock or anyplace else.
    Sorry I can't help you.
     

  3. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Your probably not going to be able to track the rack number, not unless it has a unit or you can track the unit down via serial, which will be damn near impossible.

    The rack is pretty well meaningless anyway. It means exactly what the name implies, it denotes which slot in the rifle racks it was placed in while in the armory.

    Weapons and some other gear have their serial numbers recorded in regards as to who they're issued to. This is why some people still remember their boot camp rifle's serial number. But, the serial numbers are rarely sequential as issued. Rack numbers are, making then easier to keep track of. There are two things service men need to memorize, their serial, and the rack.

    I would sand it off. It really means almost absolutely nothing, other than a nasty looking defacement of a beautiful rifle to make it easier to keep track of. Much like painting it day glow orange would make it hard to lose.
     
  4. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    I don't know about sanding it off. Personally, I like the look it has, and the history behind it. Then again, I'm one of those people who would have a hard time changing any part of a military gun. :D
     
  5. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    CMP rifles are very often made up from parts on hand. CMP will get a pallet of recievers and from stock of parts put these M-1s together. Many of these parts were shipped back from Greece or Norway etc. Trying to trace the history of one these reconditioned rifles is impossible. Your Garand is for markmanship training not for collecting.:)
     
  6. hoganfireman

    hoganfireman New Member

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    I've torn down my rifle and compared the numbers to a spreadsheet database I found on www.m1-garand-rifle.com
    everything matches except the bolt and op rod. however the numbers are so close that the bolt and op rod could have been grabbed from another bin. I also contacted the cmp and the master armorer emailed me informing me that the barrel matches the receiver. I also contacted camp grayling armory and it was common practice to paint, use tape or whatever to mark the stock for the rack number. I think I have an original intact Garand. I will reserve my excitment untill I've read my scott duff book. I will not be sanding anything!
     
  7. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Parts are often replaced as they're worn out or damaged too, that can explain the bolt and oprod. I highly doubt there is a weapon in the military that is as it came from the factory. You may very well have one that's as close as it gets. Hang on to it!

    Another note on the rack number that I didn't think of until now: some old man remembers that number, I promise you. So on second thought, as you've already decided, DON'T sand it off.
     
  8. hoganfireman

    hoganfireman New Member

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    I did have it for sale. See I was lead to believe that this was a post war Garand by the gun shop. so I never much paid attention to all the nuances of the Garand. That was untill one gentleman was overly excited and wanted to see it up close right away. He started me on my holy grail quest. My wife is even on my side, asking me "you sure you want to sell that"?
     
  9. hoganfireman

    hoganfireman New Member

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    Can anyone answer this? Are all of the internals stamped with a drawing number? I.e. the fowler, bullet guide, safety ect.
     
  10. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    I have a number of these old battle rifles I am not aware of any of these numbers. During WWII these mass produced rifles used mixed parts. All parts were not made by one company. For any of these rifles to have a collectors value it should fall into the 90%+ class condition. Anything below 90% is a nice shooter until you hit 70%. Check the NRA grading system for collectable firearms.:)
     
  11. Orlando

    Orlando New Member

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    Not all parts are stamped with a drawing number. If you want help with what you have list the parts that are marked and I will tell you whats correct for your rifle
     
  12. hoganfireman

    hoganfireman New Member

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    Since my last part I've researched all the drawing numbers and they are from march 1943- august 1944. Nothing on the rifle is post war. Which according to two sources this may be an original garand.
     
  13. Orlando

    Orlando New Member

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    Or a restored rifle by a collector
     
  14. hoganfireman

    hoganfireman New Member

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    That also could be the case. The part that is the oldest is the hammer. All the other parts match. Including the stock. according to scott duff and a couple others, batches of parts overlap during the war. But all parts are wartime and that's what makes the rifle a little more special. I have the certification letter from the cmp and emails from the head armorer at the alabama location confirming the rifle came to them and was sold in 2003, all of the batch numbers I've found match there records.
     
  15. hoganfireman

    hoganfireman New Member

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    I'm including a pic, I would think that a restored garand would have a better stock on it. Every other image I've seen of a garand with a rack number has been illegible. I'm trying not to get my hopes up but I think this rifle is original.

    ForumRunner_20121108_092149.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2012
  16. Bob Wright

    Bob Wright Member

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    During my service time in the Army, our rifles had no rack number, we knew which rifle was ours and did not always place them in the same space.

    However, when I was in high school ROTC, the numbers were stenciled on the stock as you show.

    Could be your rifle was an ROTC rifle at one time?

    Bob Wright
     
  17. Orlando

    Orlando New Member

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    I'm not bashing you or your rifle but the only thing you got from CMP was that a rifle with that serial number was sold by CMP.
    What parts were swapped since it left their hands there is no way of knowing.
    It "could" be original but odds are stacked against you it isnt
    Nice Garand either way
     
  18. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    I think every new gun buyer likes to think they have found something of great value. The truth is most amateur gun owners do not know how to value a collectable. There is more than matching numbers in defineing a special firearm.:)
     
  19. hoganfireman

    hoganfireman New Member

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    Wow here come the snobs, I'm not a novice, I own several guns. Gunsmithed some of them to a finer condition. Restored my grandfathers m1 carbine to its wartime glory. Yes this is my first garand, it is my first because this was the first one I've found that had matching numbers. I have asked for help and not received any. I've only received comments telling me my rifle is not what I think it is. I've looked hundreds of garands in the hopes of finding one that was as close to original as possible. This was the first. I've sent the info I've collected and sent it to real experts in the hopes of an actual authentication.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2012
  20. robertb6112

    robertb6112 New Member

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    When I bought my M1 carbine it also had a rack number on it. I was told it had something to do with a lend lease program. And that it possibly came from isreal.