M1 Carbine Information?

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by DocWard, Apr 16, 2014.

  1. DocWard

    DocWard New Member

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    I have an opportunity to purchase an M1 Carbine for what I consider to be a good price. It has the General Motors stamp just behind the front sight. I'm far from expert, but it appears to be in what I would call Good / Very Good Condition. As I recall, it has the bayonet lug on it.

    What other things should I be looking at / for on it?

    Thanks in advance for any input.
     
  2. Pasquanel

    Pasquanel Proud to be an American Supporter

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    Good condition, good price, so what is the question?
     

  3. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    Many carbines are built out of a pile of parts. That's not an entirely bad thing if you are just looking for a shooter, but it can have an effect on value as a collector piece.

    Had a parts carbine that was fun to shoot. Never had a collectors piece.
     
  4. DocWard

    DocWard New Member

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    Welllll..... As I indicated, I'm not really an expert, especially when it comes to the M1 Carbine, so, as I asked, are there other things I need to be looking at or for? Specifically, are there things inherent to the model that make it more or less valuable, things that should be checked to make sure it functions properly and safely, etc...
     
  5. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Look for counter boring. Counterboring doesn't mean its a bad gun but its a sign of excessive wear and the throat and headspace should be checked.

    Headspace on any unknown m1 carbine should be checked before firing as lots of folks just toss these things together from random parts. Even if great uncle billybob says he got from his granddad who fought his way through the jungles of saudi arabia against the forces of the kaiser on the russian front next to vaisily zaitsev as his spotter on iwo jima...

    M1 carbines are based solely on condition. Counter boring loose fitting parts mismatched finish colors are all signs of poor condition.
     
  6. DocWard

    DocWard New Member

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    Well, if I buy it, which I do plan to do, it will be shot, assuming I can find ammunition for it.
     
  7. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    If you get a good functioning gun for a fair price, then it's pretty easy to get you money back out of it if you ever sell it.
     
  8. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    There are some outfits like fulton armory that will rehab a m1 and send it back looking as if it was issued yesterday
     
  9. DocWard

    DocWard New Member

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    I think that helps. This one is from an estate. I can't speak to its history. It was owned by a WWII vet, but I am assuming he picked it up somewhat later.
     
  10. Egreen96

    Egreen96 New Member

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    If it does have the bayonet lug it will probably lower the value as these tend to be later produced or Korean War refurbished models



    Sent from my iPhone using Firearms Talk
     
  11. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Its an unknown parts gun in that case.

    When dealing with m1 garands m1903 m1903a3 and m1 carbines unless you yourself pulled it out of the packing crate it was shipped in from the manufacturer and purchased it from the military its pretty much a parts gun.

    True collector guns will have documentation of origin and histories that can be traced.

    This doesnt mean parts guns are valueless but they shouldnt be treated on a collector grading scale. I just put together a 1903a3 with all remington parts that if i installed the sights and took a bit of care with a matching stock it would look like a museum showpiece... cost me around 600 to build it.

    What im getting at is dont pay collector prices for a gun that has no paperwork of origin.

    You can build out a really nice m1 carbine brand new for about 1000$...

    Most carbines arent worth whats being asked for them. I hate seing folks getting ripped off. Especially if your just lookijg for a gun to shoot and have fun with.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2014
  12. DocWard

    DocWard New Member

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    That is my understanding as well. I am just going from memory. It, along with a number of other firearms were brought into one of the spare offices by two other attorneys who I share space with. Neither one knew if they had been checked to make sure they were unloaded, so I offered to do that. I didn't get a real good chance to look over the Carbine, but noticed it didn't appear to be beat up, like some of the others, and when I cycled the action, it didn't feel loose. It wasn't until I saw the appraisal come back that I decided I would see if I could get it and a Ruger Mk. II for the appraised prices.
     
  13. Egreen96

    Egreen96 New Member

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    I think if the price is right it would be a sweet shooting gun but like others have stated I wouldn't be looking for very much resale value with a non matching gun. But if the price is good and it's just going to be a shooter I think a carbine would be an excellent choice.


    Sent from my iPhone using Firearms Talk
     
  14. Ibmikey

    Ibmikey Active Member

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    Doc, i have collected Carbines since my first DCM rifle in 1963/4 ? There are so many questions about them that require research material, General Motors could mean several divisions of the company that produced Carbines somewhat independently. Most carbines were rebuilt after the war, some several times in their service life. Some have import marks--Blue sky being the least desireable as they sometimes elongated the barrel with their "stamp from hell". CMP recently released thousands that were returned from loans to other countries and may have rebuilds or modifications not native to US requirements. Get the carbine and shoot it, they are more fun than even a .22, no recoil, enough noise to say " I am shooting a .30 caliber" and short range accuracy.
     
  15. DocWard

    DocWard New Member

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    Where would I look for import marks? There was nothing below the General Motors mark on the barrel. Is there anything specifically that I should look for in the way of non-native mods / rebuilds? Based on the remainder of the collection in the estate, my guess is that it is an older purchase. While there are a few newer firearms, there is nothing that appeared to be of recent vintage. No polymer / black guns to be seen. Plenty of old shotguns and rifles. The "newest" appearing gun was actually a Thompson Center blackpowder muzzle loader.

    I based my belief that the price, $400.00, was a good one by looking at various sources online. Now I'm wondering, but it still seems like a good price for a shooter.
     
  16. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    $400 ?????? And it is a US Military issue- not civilian lookalike?


    Stuff money in pocket of seller. Grab carbine. Run home like a crazed squirrel. Lock door. Giggle insanely.
     
  17. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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  18. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    At 400 buy it if the stock isnt cracked. Its a good deal even if the barrel is shot out and it doesnt headspace right
     
  19. DocWard

    DocWard New Member

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    I will look at it again this afternoon. I don't recall seeing any flaws in the stock, other than the expected dents and dings.
     
  20. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Stocks run anywhere from 200-400 depending on condition recievers run around 230-300.

    So its a smoking deal if its a complete gun with a usable stock and a reciever. Everything else is gravy.

    Worst case you need a barrel and springs and maybe a few minor parts

    If you can get good closeup pics of the action it would help