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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Loaded magazine, pull charging handle and first cartrige fires. Next is fed to chamber, but hammer has followed the bolt so no follow up. But every time I manually operate the charging handle the hammer function correct. Change worn parts? Witch?
Garder.
 

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Is it possible to recreate the problem by hand? Pull the bolt back just enough to grab a round instead of all the way back, if the hammer doesn’t lock back I would say the gas port is plugging up, or the bolt needs a deep clean and lube. Something causing a short stroke.
 

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I'd stop using the gun until you can determine the cause. Likely: the sear in the trigger group. If the sear, and if it's mostly failing to catch, imagine what might occur if it catches but then lets go oddly. Caution.


This is for the M1 Garand, but perhaps it'll help with the eval.

M1 Garand Troubleshooting @ M1-Garand-Rifle.com.

Look at the "Cycling, reloading next round, ejecting empty clip" section.

Problem = Hammer is not cocked to fire the following round.
Probable Cause = Defective trigger group.
Remedy = Replace the trigger group.

I'm no Garand or M1 Carbine gunsmith, but it might be something to look at next time you have the gun detail stripped. Look at all of the parts, springs and mating surfaces in the trigger/sear/hammer parts.


And this is from the CMP forum, speaking of the M1 Carbine:

Help: carbine firing and cycling a round but not cocking the hammer? @ Forums.TheCMP.org.

"The carbine fired, extracted the case, fed a new round, but did not cock the hammer. "

I re-read the OP and this is caused by the sear not catching the hammer. Working the slide by hand it will.
If the bolt is going back far enough to extract the case and load a new round. The bolt is pushing the hammer back far enough. Bubba could have tried to lighten up trigger pull or playing with it to "go fast".
Replace the sear, would be my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for useful info. I will check the trigger sear hammer parts for wear and ev grind or change if necessary. 🙂👌
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Is it possible to recreate the problem by hand? Pull the bolt back just enough to grab a round instead of all the way back, if the hammer doesn’t lock back I would say the gas port is plugging up, or the bolt needs a deep clean and lube. Something causing a short stroke.
Then the hammer hoks up correctly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'd stop using the gun until you can determine the cause. Likely: the sear in the trigger group. If the sear, and if it's mostly failing to catch, imagine what might occur if it catches but then lets go oddly. Caution.


This is for the M1 Garand, but perhaps it'll help with the eval.

M1 Garand Troubleshooting @ M1-Garand-Rifle.com.

Look at the "Cycling, reloading next round, ejecting empty clip" section.

Problem = Hammer is not cocked to fire the following round.
Probable Cause = Defective trigger group.
Remedy = Replace the trigger group.

I'm no Garand or M1 Carbine gunsmith, but it might be something to look at next time you have the gun detail stripped. Look at all of the parts, springs and mating surfaces in the trigger/sear/hammer parts.


And this is from the CMP forum, speaking of the M1 Carbine:

Help: carbine firing and cycling a round but not cocking the hammer? @ Forums.TheCMP.org.
As you suggest I will check hammer sear group. 🙂👌
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Problem solved. Tok out the hammer, used dremel made the notch for the trigger more acsentuated. 🙂
 

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Problem solved. Tok out the hammer, used dremel made the notch for the trigger more acsentuated. 🙂
So, basically, the sear engagement on the hammer was not engaging properly. Hopefully it'll be safe and reliable.

Nicely, the M1 Carbine's parts aren't too complicated. Easily enough replaced, if new ones are needed.

Congrats on the resolve.
 

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So, basically, the sear engagement on the hammer was not engaging properly. Hopefully it'll be safe and reliable.

Nicely, the M1 Carbine's parts aren't too complicated. Easily enough replaced, if new ones are needed.

Congrats on the resolve.
Easy?! When I did the whole gun with Wolfe springs the hammer spring was horrible lol.
 

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Easy?! When I did the whole gun with Wolfe springs the hammer spring was horrible lol.
"It was horrible! LOL" :LOL:

Relatively speaking, sure.

Of course, of all the guns I've had over the years probably one of the worst, for springs at least, was a Browning BDM 9mm pistol. That had more puny springs that could find the corner of the living room faster 'n a duck goes for a June bug. What a pain that thing was.

But, yeah, the M1 Carbine's fairly straightforward, all things considered.

M1 Carbine's Trigger Housing Group @ UScarbineCal30.com.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So, basically, the sear engagement on the hammer was not engaging properly. Hopefully it'll be safe and reliable.

Nicely, the M1 Carbine's parts aren't too complicated. Easily enough replaced, if new ones are needed.

Congrats on the resolve.
Pleasant with everything one manage one self🙂
 

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Pleasant with everything one manage one self🙂
Other than the most-basic of firearm maintenance items, I'll leave the 'smithing to the ones who know all of that. Wasn't blessed with a gunsmith's gene ... not even a little bit. Knowing me, fumbling with the sear engagement surfaces and springs, I'd turn it into a machine gun that also makes great fries.

Enjoy the M1 Carbine. Gotta love those guns. Probably my favorite rifle of all. Had a repro about 15yrs ago, and have fired several others. Probably should have picked up a couple when CMP had the overseas batch come back, a decade ago. Ah, well. Live and learn. Always interested in finding a decent IBM or Winchester that someone's lost interest in, or whose spouse is selling with the state for $0.01. Always on the watch for that. :geek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Other than the most-basic of firearm maintenance items, I'll leave the 'smithing to the ones who know all of that. Wasn't blessed with a gunsmith's gene ... not even a little bit. Knowing me, fumbling with the sear engagement surfaces and springs, I'd turn it into a machine gun that also makes great fries.

Enjoy the M1 Carbine. Gotta love those guns. Probably my favorite rifle of all. Had a repro about 15yrs ago, and have fired several others. Probably should have picked up a couple when CMP had the overseas batch come back, a decade ago. Ah, well. Live and learn. Always interested in finding a decent IBM or Winchester that someone's lost interest in, or whose spouse is selling with the state for $0.01. Always on the watch for that. :geek:
Wel, as long as one respects ordinary safety measures even a failure has no dangerous effects.
 

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Wel, as long as one respects ordinary safety measures even a failure has no dangerous effects.
Indeed, generally speaking.

Had a Remington 700 rifle, some years back, where I'd had a gunsmith install a Jewell trigger. That bad boy allowed adjustment down to ~6oz or so. Let's just say that my adherence to nearly all the basic safe-handling guidelines helped keep that unintentional "bump" fire from striking anything important. (Just hadn't taken the last round out and put the chamber flag in its place.) Doubled the weight of the trigger, after that, and never had a further issue. Can't imagine how touchy it might have been if I'd been in their rooting around with the sear engagement myself. Ooof.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Shooting and reloading has been a hobby of mine for 40 years so I have seen several interesting incidents, but I find it pleasant to be able to ask for advice, try the suggested procedure, and thus have learned something about the specific firearm 🙂
 

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Grinding and fire-control components is generally a bad idea. If you are asking what parts need to be changed to fix your problem, you probably just want to take the gun to a gunsmith.
 

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