Looking to CCW

Discussion in 'Concealed Carrying & Personal Protection' started by cameronguyton, Jun 7, 2009.

  1. cameronguyton

    cameronguyton New Member

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    With all that is going on and the fact that in the coming months I will become a father, I am thinking seriously to start carrying. I have been researching laws for my area (I live in St. Clair county in Alabama). I am wondering what all that I may need to be aware of or know about concealed carry.

    Thanks in advance.


    Cameron
     
  2. gorknoids

    gorknoids New Member

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    Well, being a dad and a grandpa, I can tell you that you're going to have to budget. Both your time and your money. :D
    I'm going to recommend a large-capacity 9mm sub-compact which you can comfortably shoot with either hand. Tactically speaking, you need to be able to make it rain bullets while compromising your stance, and a double-stack 9mm semi is my choice for that situation.
     

  3. oldandslow

    oldandslow New Member

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    cameron, 6/9/09

    Congratulations on your impending new arrival.

    Deciding you want to CCW is an important step in protection for you and your family. The best thing you can do to become proficient with carrying is to do a lot of training and reading. For training, check NRA, the National Rifle Association website. They have a number of pistol training courses. Check Handgunlaw.us for carry information on a state by state basis. I also used google in the past and would type in "firearms training" and then add my particular state. This would give you some other options for in-state training. And carrying a concealed weapon involves a lot more than just picking a pistol. You need to pick a good holster. find a place to practice frequently, and have the appropriate clothing to cover your weapon. There are a number of pistol clubs, IDPA and IPSC/USPSA where practical shooting matches take place, at levels ranging from beginner to master. This is a good way to meet other locals who carry and can give you tips. Good luck.

    best wishes- oldandslow
     
  4. DKA

    DKA New Member

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    Not sure about Alabama, but in NC, go to Conceal Carry Class and if like here, should know about carrying when you get through. Congrats on the new baby and remember the little one is helpless, so it's up to you to protect them.
     
  5. LtpLegend

    LtpLegend New Member

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    Alabama does issue carry and conceal weapon (CCW) permits. Alabama is unusual in that the county sheriff has broad discretion on the issue of CCW permits. Check with your local Sheriff's Office and go to Homeland Security works best with legally armed citizens for details on your county. The following steps will show you how to get a concealed weapon permit in Alabama.


    Step 1

    Be at least 18 years old and a resident of Alabama. The county sheriff can set the minimum age limit higher.

    Step 2

    Fill out a CCW application at your county Sheriff's Office. If granted, the permit is good for up to one year from the date of issue. Alabama law states that the applicant must have a good reason for carrying a concealed firearm, but in practice a permit is generally granted to anyone who qualifies. Alabama counties are not required to run a background check although most do, so Alabama's CCW permit cannot serve as a National Instant Criminal System (NICS) check.

    Step 3

    Provide photo identification and other documents required by your county. Some counties require training while others do not. The fee for a carry and conceal permit varies depending on the county.

    Step 4

    Look at the Alabama attorney general's opinion at State of Alabama Attorney General's Office arguing that city and county governments can not prohibit city or county workers from carrying concealed firearms on the job. Only law enforcement officials may carry a pistol into a public school or within 1,000 feet of a demonstration.

    Step 5

    Present the CCW permit to a law enforcement officer upon demand.
     
  6. ktmboyz

    ktmboyz New Member

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  7. cameronguyton

    cameronguyton New Member

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  8. TexasCHL

    TexasCHL New Member

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    I cannot comment on the laws in the state of Alabama as I am only familiar with Texas laws regarding Concealed Handguns. But in reference to a gun to carry, there are a couple that I use:

    Ruger LCP - 380 cal.
    Colt New Agent - 45 ACP

    The Ruger is deffinately smaller, but you give up knockdown power for lightweight and easily concealed. The Colt with it's 45 acp deffinately has the knockdown power, but is still small enough to carry concealed.
     
  9. Crispy129

    Crispy129 New Member

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    I have an Alabama CCW. It just takes a few months and $10 or so. I'm up in Madison County. You just can't bring it into a Courthouse, school, or bar. It may be common sense, but don't carry if you've been drinking at all. I use a COMPTAC Minotaur IWB holster for my Glock 19 and carry Speer Gold Dot .124 gr +P hollowpoints. I like the COMPTAC holsters because they're really comfortable (especially the Minotaur), they protect the gun from perspiration better than some other ones, and you can change out the plastic part to fit other handguns. It was a close call between Gold Dot and the Federal +P+ hollow points. I found a recipe for ballistics gel, which is pretty easy to make, and might go compare the different hollow points if my local gun store sells them.
     
  10. CHLChris

    CHLChris New Member

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    Budget

    I don't know your financial picture, but gorknoids was right about making sure to look at the budget. Just because a good carry gun is $500, say, it doesn't mean it ends there. Here are some things to keep in mind in forming a budget:

    -Laser on the grip or trigger guard (some don't like a laser)
    -If not a laser, then night sights
    -self-defense rounds are more expensive (at least 50, maybe 100)
    -FMJ rounds (several hundred to begin practicing)
    -Good IWB holster (maybe a quality gun belt)
    -Gun safe (small finger-operated safes for bedside are avail.)
    -Gun cleaning materials
    -NRA safety class
    -CCW permit fees

    I am in the exact same situation as you are. I just decided to be armed to protect my family. I am starting from scratch so everything is new to me. I bought a Glock 19, which only cost about $500, but after everything is included, I'm spending about $1500 to really get started right, including the first couple of months of range practice and a couple of safety and shooting classes. When the safety of my family is at stake, I want to make sure I am ready.

    Education is a life-long process, as is maintaining shooting fundamentals, but I feel as ready as I can be right now. My CCW won't be going through for a few months so I'm using my G19 to really get a firm grasp of the fundamentals before carrying in public. Later, I'm looking at the Kahr PM9 and pocket-carrying, but my G19 should carry pretty well during the upcoming winter. The Ruger LCR would be my first choice for a revolver.

    Good luck!
     
  11. cameronguyton

    cameronguyton New Member

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    That's the damn truth! I work with so many people that have fallen into a groove of their job and don't want to learn anything else. Real sad too.

    I have a 1st generation S&W Sigma 9mm, a Springfield XD .45 ACP and XDM40. My debate was between the .45 and the .40, or go and find a subcompact in either, or a 1911 in .45. Of course it's nice to have several pistols, but I was leaning towards a 1911 simply because i can have a round chambered and the hammer not cocked. My way of thinking is this would be the safest way to carry, but still be very quick to cock if I should have to draw it out of the holster. Someone please inform me if I am mistaken.

    Also, there are several manufacturers that make a 1911, so I would have a little variety to choose from. Of course all of my thinking is not worth a damn thing if I don't spend time at the range practicing, preparing myself for what could happen, and staying informed on the laws.