Looking for some suggestions on what slugs to get

Discussion in 'General Shotgun Discussion' started by molonlabexx, Aug 7, 2014.

  1. molonlabexx

    molonlabexx New Member

    980
    0
    0
    Hey ya'll. I wanted to gauge the forums and ask what slugs are the best. I don't shoot slugs through my shotgun, just never got around to it but I got to thinking, I need something heavy hitting in case the perp hides behind a cinder block wall.

    Here is the barrel I will be running the slugs through: http://www.ebay.com/itm/231175420432?_trksid=p2059210.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT

    Smooth bore and the barrel really doesn't have a choke on it. This is EXTREMELY embarrassing but as I said, slugs are not my main suite. I was only exposed to buckshot and birdshot growing up. I just never saw the use for slugs until now. Anywho, please recommend some good loads!
     
  2. molonlabexx

    molonlabexx New Member

    980
    0
    0

  3. JCS53

    JCS53 That looks like it hurt Lifetime Supporter

    2,394
    0
    0
  4. molonlabexx

    molonlabexx New Member

    980
    0
    0
    Alright, purchased. First time using lucky gunner. Their shipping can be pretty pricey though. I ordered 3 boxes. $31 total.
     
  5. JCS53

    JCS53 That looks like it hurt Lifetime Supporter

    2,394
    0
    0
    I have a picture somewhere that will show you what will happen when you shoot one through steel at 20 yards...Let me see if I can find it. They are devastating...
     
  6. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

    6,624
    2
    0
    Any one once slug with a velocity of 1,600 fps will crush a cinder block wall. You can find plenty of videos on youtube were they do crush cinder blocks with a shotgun.

    My father worked for LA county SD during the Watts riots. There was a group of rioters shooting at people behind a block wall. Several deputies got together with pump shotguns and took the wall down with a single volley.

    In self defense I really doubt you will need to take down a block wall. But you do have a true one shot stop load for your shotgun. In the confines of your average home buckshot has to be shot just as accurately as a slug. You just as well use a slug for SD.
     
  7. JCS53

    JCS53 That looks like it hurt Lifetime Supporter

    2,394
    0
    0
    If you can ignore the guy talking here is holes in steel at 15 yards..No action, just the results.

    [ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GEMnIdr_12A&index=15&list=UURKg4xfgUpf286FsWb3iRqQ[/ame]
     
  8. molonlabexx

    molonlabexx New Member

    980
    0
    0
    Oh my sweet gravy! What have I been missing out on?!
     
  9. JCS53

    JCS53 That looks like it hurt Lifetime Supporter

    2,394
    0
    0
    Those were Sabot Slugs in a smoothbore, the one's you got will be much more accurate with the rifling probably out to 75 yards or so....Maybe even 100. Someone with more knowledge than me can be more exact but I think i'm in the right ballpark...I love blowing up TV's and such with slugs!
     
  10. molonlabexx

    molonlabexx New Member

    980
    0
    0
    I always found it Ironic that Rifled slugs cannot be fired in rifled barrels. I like the rifle slugs because they pretty much are exactly like a civil war bullet and the turning of technology with rifling. HISTORY
     
  11. JCS53

    JCS53 That looks like it hurt Lifetime Supporter

    2,394
    0
    0
    They have been great for Hunters too where they have had to use Shotgun only. The rifled slugs have given tham a much better chance of a humane kill versus a mile tracking them to the death....
     
  12. molonlabexx

    molonlabexx New Member

    980
    0
    0
    Yeah I talked several months ago with a hunter and he said the tracking after shooting the deer is the worst part.
     
  13. JCS53

    JCS53 That looks like it hurt Lifetime Supporter

    2,394
    0
    0
    It's really not much fun. I actually use .308 so it is a Humane kill...drop them in their tracks. The 1 oz. rifled slug with even fair placement will give a good quick humane kill...JMO....
     
  14. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

    21,454
    591
    113
    Rule of thumb- either the barrel or the slug may be rifled, but not both.

    Smoothbore barrel, rifled slug.

    Rifled barrel, sabot slug.

    Despite rumors to the contrary, rifled slugs do not spin from the rifling on the surface- THAT exists to make sure they will pass thru a choke safely. They are stable due to weight forward, and the skirt giving a little drag. Drop an orange into a sweat sock, throw sock, will travel orange first, sock trailing behind. Same idea.

    Slugs CAN be fired thru a choked barrel- two exceptions. First do not try this with the scarce Extra Full choke used by some turkey hunters. Bad ju-ju. Second, some of the early adjustable chokes had little steel fingers that were squeezed or not squeezed together by a collet. Little fingers can break off. Modified gives best accuracy in MOST guns- YMMV.

    A 1 oz slug has about 2538 ft lbs of muzzle energy- comparable to a .308. They are best limited to 100 yards or less- poor ballistic coefficient and low velocity give a trajectory like a rainbow beyond about 100 yds.
     
  15. molonlabexx

    molonlabexx New Member

    980
    0
    0

    Such an AWESOME post!!! Thanks for educating me! So what mainly keeps the slug from rattling around in the barrel? I am positive that the slug material is weaker then the wall material of a barrel but maybe some damage could occur?
     
  16. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

    21,454
    591
    113
    Slugs are very soft lead alloy- barrels hardened steel. Slugs are CLOSE to barrel diameter, for a snug fit.

    There is some leeway- the traditional Brenneke slug is hollow, so it can be squeezed a bit. The "rifling" on the surface of the slug can squish a bit. I have a number of shotguns that a slug (removed from the shell) will drop thru the bore with no pushing- just a snug fit.

    BTW, the pistons in the engine of your car are also a "snug" fit. They also should not "rattle" in the cylinder of your engine. :D
     
  17. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

    6,624
    2
    0
    That is partially false. As long as you shoot standard velocity slugs (1,600 fps) you will not experience any leading of your rifled barrel. Reduced recoil slugs may lead your barrel.

    My Mossberg 500 has fired many rifled slugs without any leading. Rifled slugs are accurate to about 75 yards, past 75 yards rifled slugs drop like a stone. I have never shot any rio slugs with the plastic wad that remains attached to the slug. I have seen my friends shoot rio slugs. It appears that the wad acts like a shuttlecock. The slug travels nice and straight for a short distance.

    Many people shoot reduced recoil slugs without any issues in their rifled barrel. Most of the leading occurs in ported barrels and it is not dangerous like leading in a rifle or pistol barrel.

    Shooting sabots in a smooth bore is not dangerous, except to your wallet. One will spend a lot of money to find out their smooth bore shoots better with a plain old rifled slug.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2014
  18. 303tom

    303tom Well-Known Member

    5,237
    185
    63
    Here you go, I don`t know what else to say or to show you.........
    [ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNTyCcip-ks[/ame]
     
  19. Hookeye

    Hookeye Active Member

    1,226
    5
    36
    The soft lead slugs deform and contact the barrel wall. The ribs that many see as 'rifling" on the projectile are there for two reasons.....

    First: Accuracy- ribs mean enough bbl contact with less fouling (and easier pass through chokes). Might also make for thinner skirts for easier deformation.

    Second: Folks think that they impart spin, a great sales gimmick.

    I have taken deer to 150 yards with fosters in smoothbores. But those guns were tested and were known good shooters. I did smack a buck 3 times at 165 yards with fosters from a rifled bore...........3" mags in a POS Mossberg 835 with 3.5" chamber. Only slug that shot decent in that pig back then.

    My preference is for sabots in a rifled bore. 175 yards with reg 2 3/4" HI Supremes (BRI style) was no big deal. They hit and went through on-line. Fosters can deform a bunch and veer inside the critter.

    On line travel, there still was a dramatic difference in animal reaction when pounding them with the old HI Supremes. Crumple or maybe do a step or so. Lots of red stuff.

    And I had two 870's that shot them under 2" at 100yds.

    But I buy my slugs from single lot #, also test for cleaning and fouling intervals.

    Did try some Activ fosters, with some specialty wad that supposedly stayed attached. Blasted 2 deer, both slugs fragmented. One deer ran 100 yards, easy trail to follow. The other made 3 jumps and piled up.
     
  20. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

    6,624
    2
    0
    For bang for the buck Federal Fusion sabots are pretty reasonable. If you shop around you can find 10 fusion sabots for close to $10. Fusion sabots have a realistic range of 120 yards. Hornady SST sabots are very good for the price. They can be had for $2 each and they perform just as well as the boutique slugs $3 or $4 each. Hornady SST sabots come out of the barrel at 2,000 fps. The SST slug has a great ballistic coefficient for a 300 gr projectile. 200 yard shots are possible and the slug has energy at 200 yards to be an ethical shot.

    For smoothbores the Federal Vital-Shok Truball is hard to beat. The Truball will shoot a 2" group at 50 yards with adequate sights or an optic of your choice. Using 1/2" sights Federal recommends sighting in the truball at 90 yards.

    If the barrel is loose you can tighten it up with masking tape or electric tape. Put a couple layers of tape on the barrel and tap it in place with wood block and a hammer. Be careful when tightening the barrel on a Mossberg. You don't want to damage the aluminum receiver or strip the threads on the barrel nut. The barrel has to be really sloppy on a Mossberg to need tightening. The bolt has locking lugs and two extractors that keep everything tight and lined up.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2014