Looking for some advice on an entry level .22

Discussion in '.22 Rifle/Rimfire Discussion' started by Gone_South, Sep 2, 2012.

  1. Gone_South

    Gone_South New Member

    441
    0
    0
    Thinking ahead for a Christmas gift for our two boys & was thinking of a .22 rifle.

    They are still pretty young 7 (will be 8 in January) and 11. They have a Crosman 760 BB/pellet gun that they enjoy and have learned basic shooting and firearms safety with the help of the wife & I.

    I really don't want them to start off with anything semi-auto so I would rather they learn with a bolt or even a lever. Also personally I think a scope is out until they can master shooting with iron sites (which they do surprisingly well with the 760).

    What I am looking for is some advice for a beginner .22 but something they will enjoy shooting for years to come.
     
  2. BRAD313

    BRAD313 New Member

    348
    0
    0
    Henry makes nice lever guns that will bring years of fun for them kind of costly tho if u want a cheap single shot u could get them a crickett for like a 100 bucks do u got a budget ?
     

  3. GP007

    GP007 New Member

    9
    0
    0
    It took me several decades to buy my first rifle. I choose the Henry H001.

    It is not the least expensive .22 option on the market, but lever action is more expensive that bolt action or semi. Marlin and Browning make a nice lever action but are substantially more. You can buy two Henry's for the cost of a single Marlin 39A.

    Marlin makes some nice bolt action .22's for less than the Henry. The Ruger 10/22 is a popular model.

    Henry does make a youth sized .22 lever action.
     
  4. Gone_South

    Gone_South New Member

    441
    0
    0
    Price really isn't a factor because I am starting this early unlike a lot of Christmases in the past where I wait until the last minute. I have seen the Henry online in the $300-$400 range while high is okay.

    Main thing I am looking for is something reliable, accurate, durable and most of all something that they can enjoy for 5-6 years before they start to move into something with more power. I figure the oldest I will introduce to shotguns in the next couple of years but the 7 almost 8 year old it will be a while.

    As far as the Henry how stiff is the lever action? I don't think the 11 year old would have a problem (he's a hoss) but I was thinking more the younger boy. I still pump his 760 for him.

    Honestly I am a little selfish as I would like to be able to plink around with them ;)
     
  5. BRAD313

    BRAD313 New Member

    348
    0
    0
    The henrys arnt bad but not sure for a young guy take them to the store and let them pick some of them and up see wich they like and hold best then you will know Wich to get them .
     
  6. kycol

    kycol New Member

    1,506
    1
    0
    I started my grandson off with a cricket, a single shot bolt action. The chipmunk is pretty much the same thing. These are just the right size and weight. When I first started taking him he thought he wanted to shoot my other rifles and I told him after he learned the basics he could move up. But know when I offer other guns to him he wants to stick with his cricket. He says my others are too big or too heavy. He has gotten very quick with his reloading and firing. I give him so many at a time to put in his pocket. He is getting fast and accurate.

    A Marlin 60 is a great rifle and accurate as hell semi-auto but is a little big and heavy for that age shooter. The browning 22auto is a good size for younger shooters and can not be beat for accuracy and reliability. This is the rifle I cut my teeth on, my Dad still has it and I still love it. He also had a 22 lever action called a palomino I think it was a Mossberg and I loved to shoot it.

    Also this weekend I saw a citadel m1 22lr with a black synthetic stock, when I picked it up I could not believe just how light it was. I am thinking it may be my grandsons next rifle. You really got to hold one.
     

    Attached Files:

  7. GP007

    GP007 New Member

    9
    0
    0
    They sell all day long in my local area for $279.

    I think the Henry fits this criteria perfectly. Although I think they'll keep their first .22 regardless what model you get them.

    I tried the action of three levers and found the Henry to be the smoothest and easiest. The Marlin 39A felt a little tight but would assume that would break in over the years. The Browning was close to the Henry. But the Henry was hands down the smoothest and lightest.

    It is a great value.
     
  8. Josh1158

    Josh1158 New Member

    757
    0
    0
    I agree, the lever on a henry is the best out there Just check the rear sight before you buy it. Mine is off to the left alittle. I was gona put a scope on it from the get go so its not much of a problem. But with the irons its about 4 inches off and theres no adjusting it.
     
  9. Gone_South

    Gone_South New Member

    441
    0
    0
    Thanks for the input. Gives me some ideas to start with. As in all firearms it's up to the shooter as what they like but for me it seems to really help a lot when you can get some other ideas to look at as well.

    I know as with everything else with these two boys we will end up buying a second one so they will each have their own.

    I always start to ask myself why can't they share but then memory kicks in and being the youngest growing up with 2 older brothers I know it's impossible to share.
     
  10. BillM

    BillM Active Member Supporter

    1,146
    1
    38
    Get them a magazine fed bolt action 22. Don't let them have the magazine until they are competent with it as a single shot.

    Savage MkII GY would be one choice---youth size stock, but it can be
    re-stocked with bigger better wood as they grow into it.
     
  11. ScottA

    ScottA FAA licensed bugsmasher Lifetime Supporter

    7,141
    0
    0
    Non-semi .22

    I'd probably look first at a Henry lever action. First because it is just a darn cool gun. Second because I can't remember anyone complaining about it.

    Or check out the myriad of bolt actions: Savage, Marlin, etc.
     
  12. BRAD313

    BRAD313 New Member

    348
    0
    0
    Also if u see a used Ruger model 96 it is also a good lever gun
     
  13. GP007

    GP007 New Member

    9
    0
    0
    LOL! I have two younger brothers and, if memory serves correctly, they were quite annoying most of the time. Therefore it was my obligation to 'keep them inline' by any means necessary.

    Of course I'm sure their memory is a little different on the matter.

    But to your point, sharing was not an option unless it served MY best interests or I was suffering a fleeting sense of empathy.
     
  14. longunner

    longunner New Member

    1,176
    0
    0
    I would go with a Savage Mark II its not a single shot but it is a great rifle and decently priced.
     
  15. slim325

    slim325 New Member

    108
    0
    0
    Buy them both there one if u can afford to.Buy the cricket for the youngest it will be more fun for him.The Henry for the older one I have three kids its much easier and they don't share a present then u can't buy kids smiles from a new gun
     
  16. Gone_South

    Gone_South New Member

    441
    0
    0
    This is kind of the direction I am leaning towards. A very entry level, inexpensive one for the youngest and something a little more advanced for the older boy....and me. :eek:
     
  17. Gone_South

    Gone_South New Member

    441
    0
    0
    By the way, thanks to everybody for the input so far. All of this will help in our decision making.
     
  18. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

    8,409
    1
    0
    Either a Henry lever or a Marlin 60...
     
  19. StoneCat

    StoneCat New Member

    119
    0
    0
    As far as "entry level" I'm a supporter of the Ruger 10/22.

    Namely because of its after-market support. Want a bigger mag? Done. Match barrel? Done. Different stock? No sweat...

    Plus its cheap, reliable, accurate...

    Just fine for a a new shooter.

    That being said, if I had a dollar for every good beginners .22lr, I'd be able to buy a fine savage model 10.
     
  20. RustyShackleford101

    RustyShackleford101 New Member

    796
    0
    0
    I'm talking from some experience here. I would probably go with a single shot. Ithaca 49, Rossi, but it's best to get an inexpensive one. The single shots are good because there is much less of a chance of a negligent discharge, and it is better at teaching fundamentals. Also, I wouldn't put a scope on it. It is much better to start them off with open sights and move up on a scope.