Looking for advice

Discussion in 'Concealed Carrying & Personal Protection' started by SurrealSymbiont, Mar 28, 2014.

  1. SurrealSymbiont

    SurrealSymbiont New Member

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    Sorry if reposted. I didn't think that it went through the first time...

    First off, I'm new. I made this account specifically to make this request, one I'm sure you probably get quite a bit:

    I'm looking for advice in purchasing a handgun.

    Bit of info to maybe get you experts thinking- I'm not new to guns. I grew up with them, but have never bought one myself. The pistols I've used the most growing up were a S&W .38 Special, Glock 20 10mm AUTO and a .22 Browning Buckmark. I was very partial to the Glock.
    I'm looking into getting a pistol now for defense. In two months I'm moving to Anchorage, AK. I'm going back to school there and have been thinking of starting up a freelance computer repair business. I'd be going out to people locales to work and would operate out of my house. Thing is, other people have told me, and I agree, that perhaps it would be beneficial to have a weapon in my car that I could put on my person should I be called out to a place that gave a bad impression.
    Which isn't to mention, it is a city, has a relatively high crime rate, non-existent gun laws, and is... well... Alaska.
    Alright, now you know what it is for, now let's see if you can tailor it to me! I want something that is able to be concealed on my person. I was thinking of a shoulder rig, but I don't know. I also need something that is made for large hands. I'm 6'6", 280 (hence why I've not thought about guns much until my next move). My hands aren't fat, no fat fingers. Just big with long fingers. I've a large frame, so take that into account for where I would keep such a weapon on my person. I'd prefer a caliber with some heft, just out of personal preference. I've always liked the weight of such things.
    Other than that, I'm right handed. Prefer an automatic over a revolver. Is there an advantage to a double action pistol? Is the function the same as in revolvers? I'd also like to be able to practice with the weapon such that I don't have to spend a great deal on ammunition.

    I'll update this if I think of anything else. Thanks in advance for your help in getting me started.
     
  2. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    I am not the biggest Glock fan, but they make many handguns known for their reliability and standardization; perhaps you could find one similar to the Glock 20 that uses a less expensive ammunition than 10mm? Alternatively, there are people who have the Glock 20 with its potent 10mm cabability but who have aftermarket barrels and magazines to allow them to fire less powerful calibers for practice or plinking fun. I believe one of our forumites has the Glock 20 with a 9mm barrel, a .40sw barrel, and the 10mm barrel.

    I wouldn't think that even a full-sized Glock like the standard model 20 would be hard to conceal in cold weather wear.

    You might also find the 10mm to be useful on the local ursine menaces.


    "Double action" basically means that you don't have to "cock" the hammer of the firearm before the trigger will fire it; the gun does "double action" when you pull the trigger, cocking the hammer/striker and releasing it with the same pull of the trigger. This is most apparent in revolvers; cowboy-style single action revolvers require you to cock the hammer before pulling the trigger while more "modern" double action revolvers can use a heavier trigger to both cock & drop the hammer.
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2014

  3. SurrealSymbiont

    SurrealSymbiont New Member

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    Thank you very much for a prompt reply. I'm only partial to the Glock as it is the only pistol I've really fired more than once. My dad swears by that Glock 20. I am not closed to the idea of going to a different brand. What, if I may ask, would you suggest? I'm looking to spend somewhere around $500-$600US, but for something fantastic that would last me a long time, I could go higher.

    Ah, yes, bears. I wasn't going to list that as one of my possible uses as to avoid the brigade of pepper spray people. It is a gun forum though...

    Ah, so just like on a revolver, a double action pistol, when cocked, shortens the trigger pull?
     
  4. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    In polymer pistols, I am fond of my XD45. For Alaska, though, I would really think the 10mm capability would be worth having, if not for bear then for better penetration of heavy and multiple layers of winter clothing. If you are familiar with that Glock 20, I would keep it as a front runner.

    Many "double action" semi-automatic pistols use a striker that cannot be manually cocked, like the Glock 20; effectively making them "double action only". Some semi-auto pistols offer the option to cock a hammer for a lighter trigger pull; they call these SA/DA or single action/double action, like the 1911 pistols.

    http://www.slickguns.com/category/hand-guns This is a link to a popular website listing firearms on sale at different online and brick-n-mortar retailers.

    http://www.budsgunshop.com/catalog/product_info.php/products_id/15616
    That one fits your budget and allows for caliber options, but I have no first-hand experience with that brand. The design is remarkable similar to that of a CZ-75b, a fine pistol.
     
  5. eatmydust

    eatmydust New Member

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    Cut me a break Glock-haters!

    1) A Glock 23 in .40 S&W can be retrofitted with a Lone Wolf 40- 9mm conversion barrel, holds 13+ rounds and can also be converted to a .357 Sig, with the right conversion barrel, if you think .40 S&W wont handle the vermin you'll have to deal with.

    The G23 is a compact, but not tiny, is concealable 12 months a year in AK. 9mm ammo is second only to .22lr in affordability and the Glock is known for reliability and has nearly as many after-market mods as the AR-15.

    2) A Ruger Super Redhawk Alaskan in .44 mag. has a 2 1/2" barrel and is a CC cannon. You can practice with .44 spl. and pack magnum rounds when needed.

    Besides this is just a badass gun!

    There's something to think about, and good luck in you adventures in Alaska!
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2014
  6. kbd512

    kbd512 Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    If you're going to Alaska, and since you're the size of a small tree, get the 10MM Glock. The 10MM is a little more common in Alaska because it's common for people there to use them in self defense against some of the larger wildlife found in that state. The Gen 4 10MM and .45 ACP models fit my hand perfectly, but you may want to use the backstrap replacements that come with the gun or a Gen 3 model.

    As far as advantages are concerned, full power 10MM is equivalent to a standard .357 Magnum loading. You have 15 in the magazine with a Glock 20.

    Don't expect miracles against an angry bear when all you have is a 10MM. A .44 Magnum revolver will work better.

    I realize there are larger caliber revolvers out there, but the ammo for them is insanely expensive, rough on the hands, and may be difficult to obtain.

    Anything large enough to reliably take down a bear will be sub-optimal against humans, so decide which one you're most likely to have to come to terms with.
     
  7. hardluk1

    hardluk1 Active Member

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    You have a glock 20 now. If you shoot it well then your covered or maybe a glock 29 . Your big enough to wear it how ever you wish to maybe even appendix carry . You walk inside you will atleast unzip and its then at the ready. You could ware iwb or owb cross draw or straight up at 2;30 set high and cover easily with a shirt.

    This is a very good 10mm ammo to -
    http://www.underwoodammo.com/10mmAuto220GrainHardCastFlatNoseBoxof50.aspx
     
  8. JW357

    JW357 New Member

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    Good posts so far everyone. Just a couple notes:

    - Gello, 1911s are not SA/DA. They are single action only. The hammer must be cocked in order for them to fire.

    - Hardluk1, unless I misunderstood the OP, he himself doesn't have a G20. His father does. But he has trigger time on it.

    - OP, all the previous suggestions are reasonable given your specifics. I have a few thoughts:

    1) Go to a gun store and handle various models. See what fits your hand the best. Rent and shoot some that are on the short list if possible.

    2) Will you be a resident officially of Alaska? If so, I believe no permit is required to conceal carry a firearm. In this regard, I recommend ALWAYS carrying when it is legal to do so. A gun in your car does no good if you need it and you aren't in your car.

    3) If your main concern is bears, a 10mm with deep penetrating ammunition would be an ok choice. The problem is, in my opinion, that even hollow points in 10mm might over-penetrate against two-legged attackers, thus causing a potential danger to innocents. Just something to think about. I agree that you might need to decide which is more likely to be a danger to you.

    4) There's no perfect choice. Handguns are always a compromise in some regard.

    5) Be familiar with the law in Alaska, always. Even if it means taking a concealed carry course when you get there.

    Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2014
  9. hardluk1

    hardluk1 Active Member

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    Keep a can of bear spray for grizzly's handy. Its does work. Then buy what you like best for human issues. The 10mm is still a good choice as people tend to be dressed heavier up there year round. Maybe a 45auto version. May depend more on what ammo is available more often . All firearm companies make good and bad handguns too. Its part of the luck of the draw.
     
  10. Fruecrue

    Fruecrue New Member

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    I think the glock 20 or 21 would suit you well. The 21 in .45 acp would be cheaper to practice with and may be better suited for use in populated areas, but the 20 in 10mm provides more firepower, either way, you won't be disappointed. Maybe buy both if the budget allows as holsters will fit both guns and I'd advocate a second gun over a conversion barrel or kit any day.
     
  11. deg

    deg Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Surreal, in case no one has told you – bears don’t carry guns. Dude, you’re 6’6” 280 lbs. what the crap are you worried about bears for? Just pin’em for 20 sec. and they’ll get up and leave. Trust me….
     
  12. Mercator

    Mercator New Member

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    Yes, it does, on a hammer-fired SA/DA pistol.
    For the best value alternative, consider the SIG PRO 2022 (no .45ACP), the Beretta 92F (or PX4 Storm if you want a 45), and the full size Springfield XD (a slightly different take on the Glock concept).

    Also keep in mind that orangello sees bears everywhere.
     
  13. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    10mm sounds like a good caliber choice for Alaska if you are not taking on big bears. Heavy clothing is a factor so look for ammo with non clog features like poly tip. There are several handguns available in 10mm. You have trigger time on the Glock so it is a likely choice along with other striker fired pistols. The 1911 is available in 10mm but keep in mind it will take some additional training. It is normally carried cocked and locked meaning the hammer is cocked and the safety is on. You will have to train with the safety. The trigger on the 1911 is the best feature, similar to the single action on a revolver. I would seriously consider a 45 ACP with 230 grain hardball. It will give the needed penetration, very reliable feeding along with being relatively cheap to shoot and practice with. If I were choosing from my current handguns for your situation, I would carry my XD45 compact. I have a choice of 10 round or extended grip 13 round mags. With a loaded 10 round mag and one in the chamber it weighs about a pound less than a 1911 with an 8 round mag and one in the chamber.
    How you will carry is a big consideration. You wont have time to undress if you need it in a hurry. Look for a parka or heavy jacket with a slash pocket on the chest on the outside. Along with the big gun you might want to consider having a smaller gun concealed for when the parka is off. An XDS45 would be a good companion to an XD45 or XD45 compact.
     
  14. luposk

    luposk New Member

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    My everyday carry is a G20 g3 w/ a green lasermax plus 2 spare mags. I'm 6'2" at around 220lbs and I can conceal it w/o problems. I carry it mostly OWB at 3:30, sometimes shoulder holster when wearing a jacket. Gun laws are way more restrictive here (you have to conceal your weapon at all times) and never had a problem. I've got large hands as well and the G20 fits me like a charm. I really like the trigger safety and not having to think about anything but drawing and pulling the trigger (I carry w/ one in the pipe). Needless to say, I got well over 5k rounds through her with about 10 jams overall - exclusively when using cheap Blazer range ammo.

    10mm is the way to go in Alaska I'd say. We got "some" bears around here as well and I do have a couple of friends who engaged one with a 9mil and he just seemed more pissed. I strongly believe that one of 10mm 200gr XTPs or 165gr FMJ would be a party ceasher for him.


    Sent from my iPhone, sorry for typos...
     
  15. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    Yup, I missed that one. I was thinking of my bersa 9mm is sa/da, but the 1911's would be SA only (with the exception of some of those LDA things).
     
  16. SurrealSymbiont

    SurrealSymbiont New Member

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    Whoa! Thank you everybody! This is all a lot of help.

    TL:DR Bit of a story of my going out to my neighborhood gun shops over the last few days; then returning to my original question

    So, small town Montana (5000 pop I think), there are two stores to buy a weapon. The second, where I went yesterday, had a very nice selection, and I was able to hold a lot of the pistols all of you have mentioned. There was also a man there (I thought he worked there, but he was just a great guy) who I would not be surprised if he was a member of this forum. We spent about an hour and a half working through all of the workable possibilities. Incidentally, I got to hold an actual Desert Eagle yesterday. Damn, that is a large weapon, I'd have to be feeling quite insecure the day I got that! Very cool though.
    Anyway, Sig, FN, Springfield, Glock, and a few entry model 1911s. I've always loved the classic-ness of them, and almost had me talked into a very nice 1911 from Rock Island. Once I said I was looking for a defense capacity, I was steered away. Essentially, the man not working there brought out 3 different Glocks in the same frame as the Glock 20 I'm familiar with (note: the generation I used had a capacity of 10; G3? G2?). Being able identify the Glock 20 10mm every time it was or was not placed in my hand with my eyes closed sort of sold me right back to Glock. Apparently my draw, as was commented, was much better and lined naturally with the sights. To this, I feel that I'll be saving ammunition that is going to be more expensive, just by the fact that I'll not need to shoot to become proficient, merely to maintain my skills.
    It is notable that I am very taken with the Sig p226. If it was not for the price, I think I would go that way. As of now, I think I shall go out and pick up a Gen4 Glock 20.


    Alright. Enough of my shopping escapades! Addressing some of the points posted in this thread:

    I'm looking for a defense from people weapon, first and foremost. People are dangerous in a malicious or otherwise thought induced fashion. Bears are just running on animal instincts. Honestly I think I'd rather bearspray (with a gun as well) while out in the woods. I run across a bear: that bear didn't do anything to me, I bumbled into it, and I would rather not kill it. I'm looking for a weapon in the mindset that it will be better to have a gun and not need it... you know the rest.

    I will be an Alaska resident. I can get my drivers license within days of my arrival. I wanted to make the purchase in the lower 48 to avoid a probable increase in price.

    You can* get a permit in Alaska for a weapon, but it not required. A permit is not required for concealed carry. The only think that I know for sure that is* required is that you must declare if you are carrying or have one in your car if you are stopped by a police officer.

    I'm a student and going to Alaska to attend UAA, and I imagine it will be much like my old school, MSU Bozeman MT, that guns are illegal on campus, even in cars parked in the lots.

    Again, as per my research, help here online and in the stores. I think I'm going to go with the Glock 20. I'm most comfortable with it, and the training required to get me to par will be less, mitigating the cost of ammunition. I'll most likely be posting a great deal more in this forum. Next probably in the ammunition section. Again, thank you all for your help!
     
  17. phildenton

    phildenton New Member

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    while glock is not for me personally, i would say the g20 in 10mm as a good choice in a semi, or a 2 1/2" to 4" barreled 44 mag ruger for a wheelgun, i think either would have the range of power for which may be needed in alaska.
     
  18. JW357

    JW357 New Member

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    I think you made a smart, informed decision. You did your research and homework, which is commendable. Too many people run out and buy the first gun they find.

    What your final decision was shouldn't matter to us since you went about it in an intelligent manner.

    Best of luck to you and I hope you do stay active on the forum.
     
  19. SurrealSymbiont

    SurrealSymbiont New Member

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    I didn't even see the second page of replies that start with Deg. Oops.

    >Deg - Haha. You're probably right! Just pop them in the nose then we can paw-wrestle and catch some fish. AmIright!?

    I've read about the Sig 2022. Very underrated p226 type weapon, correct? (can't remember where I read that) I haven't found one to hold it. I held a Beretta 92F/S a few days ago; while the feel was excellent, I didn't like the trigger pull, and I agreed with someone who told me it's a very big gun for only shooting a 9mm.

    >JTJ: Thanks for bringing up holsters. (not sure if I should post this in another section, but while I have you all here...) Where would you recommend I holster a G20 on my person? I don't wear puffy winter coats. At any point during the year, I'd be wearing either a leather bomber (most of the time, barring super cold), wool shooting coat (like woolrich or something similar), a peacoat, or a 3/4 length wool overcoat. So: Shoulder rig or hip mount with these considerations? Pro, cons of each?

    Luposk: Thnaks for that. I'm certain now that I'll be able to conceal it without a problem.
     
  20. k9guy

    k9guy New Member

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    The main thing is to carry enough gun the 1911 might be the best choice you are large enough to hide one on you person 45 cal is a real man stopper too


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