Looking for a good Laser for a Rifle

Discussion in 'Firearm Accessories & Gear' started by Bubba4477, Jan 26, 2009.

  1. Bubba4477

    Bubba4477 New Member

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    I have recently recived a laser for my AR-15. It turned out to be a total piece of junk! It was very bright, but I could not get the adjustments to work very well at all. I talked to the manufacturer and they sent me a new one. Same problem, so it was not a defective unit. This is the Laser I am trying to return now.
    Green Laser Sight w/ Picatinny Rail - LASER SIGHTS by Combathunting.com

    I was considering getting another one. I have done some research and this is the next best one i can find at this price point. I know there are several around $400, but I was hoping to stay under $200. Anyone have this laser? Any other suggestions?
    Amazon.com: Green Laser Gun Sight high power 25mw average with Attenucap: Sports & Outdoors

    Thanks for your help!
     
  2. Bubba4477

    Bubba4477 New Member

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    No one out there has used a laser on thier rifle before?
     

  3. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    Are you sure your rail is true to the barrel?
     
  4. Bubba4477

    Bubba4477 New Member

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    I tested that. I am using a 2 rail setup on my front tower sight. I thought "maybe the rails are not aligned with the barrel" and I tried to adjust them a little. It didnt help.

    But bottom line, when I adjusted the original laser using the wiered 3 screw system the laser did not move much at all, so even if the rail wasnt stright, the adjustments didnt work anyway.

    Also I would prefer a green laser (powerful) as it is easier to see in the daylight, and if anyone has any experiance with one they trust I would appreciate any recomendations.
     
  5. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    Here's a hint; NO laser, save some gub-mint satellite-melting weapons-grade unit works in daylight. If you mean low-light, dusk etc, the green may have some advantage seeing wise, but remember that visibility works both ways! Green lasers are extremely easy to back follow allowing the BG's to target you!

    When you hard mount the laser to the rail do you pay attention to the indexing diagram on the output end of the unit?

    If yes, forget about that step. Make sure your adjustment screws are centered (equal adjustment available in + & - direction for each axis) and finger tighten the mounting rings.

    NOTE: set your target distance to what you expect to shoot, read: if the laser is going to be used for clearing rooms, don't set the target distance during set-up at 50' when the weapon's intended use is <15'. (See later note.)

    When you do your initial sight-in, and before you touch the adjustment screws, try twisting the laser module to find the closest position to bulls eye. (This is much easier when using a bore laser in conjunction with the new laser module.) Then tighten the mounting rings. REMOVE the bore laser and throw your first round down range. Now walk the rounds in while using the adjustment screws. Shoot a minimum of three (more to achieve greater accuracy) rounds before making the next adjustment. Work one axis at a time; otherwise you will be chasing your tail! Once the vertical or horizontal is dialed in, move to the other and walk it in till you get it right. (The opposite will change) When this axis is on mark then switch back to the other and start over. You must do this, as many times as it takes to get it right!

    Later note: This will save your life, pay attention.
    First, keep the laser protected as you would with any optics. Retains accuracy, and be sure to keep fresh batteries! Do not long store with batteries installed!
    Here’s the really important part. Now that you have the laser dialed in, let me teach you the true meaning of parallax. Changing nothing other than target distance, and reinstalling the bore site-laser, move the target 10’ down range and put the sighting laser on the bulls eye and look where the bore laser is located! Write it down! Now move the target another 10’ down range, and record the change. If you do not have a bore laser, throw a round down range at each distance change, when you walk to the target to change to the next distance, mark each hit with what distance was shot. Depending on your rail type and where on the rifle you mount the laser, you will have empirical data showing the parallax at greater/less than set up target distance.

    Memorize and practice adjusting the laser dot location with distances other than set-up.

    It could save your life by providing a hit with adapting rather than a miss!
     
  6. Bubba4477

    Bubba4477 New Member

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    All good info. One big problem with my first laser was that there were 3 adjustment screws... not 2.... It did not adjust x and y. around the head of the laser were 3 screws in a triangle pattern. As you tightend or loosened those screws it would move in that direction (1 of 3). Just not enoph to line up with my scope.
     
  7. notdku

    notdku Administrator Staff Member

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    What AR configuration are you running?
     
  8. Bubba4477

    Bubba4477 New Member

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    I got a Bushmaster AR-15 that will take either 5.56 or .223. Collapsoable stock. Flat top picany rail with a 3-9x scope mounted. It has a heavy Barrel and the longer standard heatshield. Dual rails sandwiched on the front tower sight with a flashlight (and hopefully soon a green laser). And a rail on the bayonet lug with a bipod mounted there.

    Coudnt find a pic online of my model and I dont have any pictures of mine on the web. It shoots great, I think i have only ever had one malfunction the first time I shot it.
     
  9. BillM

    BillM Active Member Supporter

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    All the lasers I've seen with three screws used one screw for
    windage, one for elevation, and the third screw was a lock to
    hold the settings.

    Usually 2 screws at 90 degrees to each other, and the
    lock screw at 45 degrees or directly opposite 45 degrees.

    Loosen lock screw, adjust, tighten lockscrew. Cuss a lot
    because when you tighten the lockscrew the settings change.
    Repeat.
     
  10. Bubba4477

    Bubba4477 New Member

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    unfortunetly that would actually make sense... this one does not... all three adjust it... there is no Lock screw. The 3 screws make a eqaullateral triangle around the laser head. each one goes though the body of the houseing and into the laser module, each is surrounded buy a sping that pushes the laser off of the housing, so as you tighten one the laser moves away from that screw, as you loosen it, the laser moves toward it... I'm telling you the one I have it a total piece of junk. And the seller sucks too, wouldnt help me or let me return it. So now im disputing the charges with my CC.

    Thats why im here looking for a better alternitive.
     
  11. Bubba4477

    Bubba4477 New Member

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    2nd one is OK

    I wanted to let you guys know how the 2nd laser performed.

    I mounted it on my rifle, and this laser too has an odd adjustment system. There is a rubber buffer between the housing and the laser module that runs between the 2 for aprox. 135 degrees. Then on the opposite side of the housing there are 2 screws also 135 degrees apart that when tightened push in on the laser module and in turn against the rubber buffer. So there is no X and Y, but I was able to fairly quickly adjust the laser in. And in a big step up from my first laser the adjustments actually change where the laser points!

    Also while mounting I found a flaw with one of the switches. This laser comes with 2 switches. One is the standard tactical pressure switch with a curly cord. I don’t like these because you have to stick them on the gun. The other is a push button (quick on) or a screw on (always on) setup. Since I don’t use it all the time, I prefer this setup, but when you unscrew this switch to turn the light off the cap does not have enough tension to stay in place. It feels like it will rattle off pretty easily. I was able to fix this by adding a rubber O ring on the threads. Now the screw cap needs to be screwed on pretty tight to active the laser in its always on state, but it won’t just fall off. I don’t know how it will hold up long term, but it works for now.

    In the field the laser worked ok. I sighted it at 25 yards and was able to see it just fine in broad daylight. I centered it on my scope which shot perfect all day long. After just a few shots the laser was off by a 1-2 inches at 25 yards. I didn’t take too many shots, so I don’t know how bad this problem will be in the long term, but it will not hold a perfect zero. I re-centered the laser on my scope again and shot 4 more shots. It lost its zero again. If after several hundred shots it is still only 1-2 inches at 25 yards then I would still find it useful.

    I don’t have a ton of experience with lasers, so I don’t know if the zero issue is common or not.
     
  12. lobo

    lobo New Member

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    try j&g sales in prescott az. good green laser,good"green"price.fits,works perfecton my ar15
    lobo
     
  13. biff44

    biff44 New Member

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    I do not believe in lasers or red dot sights for defensive weapons. Too complicated. They can fail or the battery can die just when you need it to work.

    Get a good set of tritium dot sights. They will last forever and will take a lickin and keep on tickin. Good in low light. And you do not have the laser giving your position away.

    http://www.calssportingarmory.com/Trijicon_CP25_Colt_AR15_M16_Tritium_Sight_Set_p/trcp25.htm

    Save your red dots or lasers for fooling around at the range.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2009