Looking for a good first compound bow

Discussion in 'Other Weapons' started by Yunus, Mar 11, 2011.

  1. Yunus

    Yunus New Member

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    I have about zero knowledge of compound bows but want to buy one and learn to use it well. I'm looking for recommendations from someone knowledgeable on the subject. To put it in firearms terms, I don't need a Nighthawk but don't want a Llama either. I'm looking for the Colt or Springfield equivalent.

    What do I need to look for in a bow? Is there a price point that separates crap and quality? What brand names are reliable? What should I know that I don't know to ask?
     
  2. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    *shameless pimping* Don't forget to check your Promotive discounts. ;)

    If NGIB doesn't jump right in, I would PM him. He has been spending a lot of time on an archery forum and has learned a ton. We have had a couple of back channel communique's about it and he is really digging having a bow in the arsenal. I am betting he will have some good "baseline" questions to help in your hunt.

    And keep us informed. Thanks to that damn TxHillbilly I am seriously looking at a crossbow now. *shaking fist*:D

    JD
     

  3. Yunus

    Yunus New Member

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    Are you thinking the AR-15 crossbow? I think it looks bad *** but it's pricey.
     
  4. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    I have drooled over it.

    I have lusted for it.

    I handled it at SHOT.

    But the one that TxHillbilly got is SO much more practical and the trade off in FPS and weight of the bolts is pretty small for 2 times the price. :eek:

    I have not, however, ruled it out though. :eek:
     
  5. NitroxAZ

    NitroxAZ New Member

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  6. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    Ha,Ha,Ha! Sorry J.D.,but look at it this way.I'm saving you from buying another gun.
    I looked at the PSE Tac-15 for a long time,but the cost of it doesn't fit the equipment that you get.Plus those PSE bolts are very pricey for that thing.

    Yunus,I would suggest that you visit an archery store near you.Most will try to get you headed in the direction that you want to go,and also let you shoot several different bows to find what fits you and that you like.
    Bowtech/Diamond
    Parker
    Pearson
    PSE
    All have great starter priced bows that won't cause you to take out a second mortage.
     
  7. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    LMFAO!! Quoted for Truth My Brother!

    But I am REALLY considering doing some pricing of that AWESOME looking crossbow in your safe. You bastard!! :p
     
  8. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

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    I am a noob to bows but as JD said I did a lot of research before I bought the 2 I have. First are you looking for a target bow or a hunting bow? Target bows are generally longer axle to axle and don't have the fiercely aggressive cams. Hunting bows are short and most have very aggressive cams to squeeze out every possible bit of speed. I just shoot in the backyard and never plan to hunt so I went the target bow route. Both of mine are Martins, a RazorX and a Sceptre, and they are very smooth shooters. I bought both of them used at about a 3rd of their new price and both were in pristine shape. I shoot with fingers as well as a release and most short aggressive cam hunting bows don't finger shoot very well.

    Used bows do not hold their value like used guns so keep this in mind. It's easy to pay upwards of $700 for a new bow and not to hard to find the same bow lightly used for $300 or so. A new bow many times does not come with everything you need to shoot it like sights, a rest, a stabilizer, and so on. A used bow will generally have all these accessories installed which saves you lots of money. One caveat to buying used is it's best to have it checked out by a bow shop. Strings wear quickly and if it's ever been dry fired the cams can be damaged. Also, and this is advice I got from Bear, go to a bow shop to get measured as if the bow don't fit you will not shoot well. My draw length is 30.5 inches so I had to find a bow that could go this far. Many bows stop at 30 inches and correct draw length is absolutely critical.

    As far as brands, bow fanboys are about 1000% worse than Glock (or 1911) fanboys. It's very hard to get any good info as brand loyalty seems to be everything in the bow world. Any of the top companies make nice stuff including Matthews, Hoyt, Bowtech, PSE, Martin and the like. I know Bear is a Matthews fan and I'd trust him in bows as well as guns. One of the reasons I went with Martin is they have a great reputation for customer service and their bows can be disassembled without a bow press - many can't. Also, Martin allows a wider range of pull weight adjustment than some other brands. The pull weight is lightened by loosening the limb bolts an equal amount and 4-5 turns is all most manufacturers recommend. With a Martin you can go 6 turns with no problems and with a gimpy shoulder I like to be able to lessen the weight a tad more. Both of mine are 60# and I usually have them set in the 45# range.

    Hope this helped some as it's truly difficult to find unbiased bow information. The only real forum is Archerytalk and TBH it's not very friendly and the "fanboyness" is overwhelming...
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2011
  9. Yunus

    Yunus New Member

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    What is the life expectancy of a new bow? I'm just wondering why the value of a used one drops so quickly.
     
  10. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Well-Known Member

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    Yunus, it don't matter what brand bow you get. What matters is that it fits YOU. That means getting a bow with draw length EXACTLY what your draw length is. A bow shop will help you find your draw length. Another thing is don't get carried away with too much draw weight-my bow only maxes out @ 60 pounds. You'll want at LEAST a 7" brace height. A good target is a must. I'd recommend good carbon arrows.
     
  11. Yunus

    Yunus New Member

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    I just picked up a Diamond Outlaw. I have a 28" draw according to the guys in the shop.

    Thanks for the recommendation to go to a bow shop. I can't imagine not getting to shoot a bow before buying my first one and getting sized and fit made a world of difference. I was measured at 27" but 28" felt better and they said I had better form with it as well. They said it was set for 60lbs right now, honestly I don't know what it maxes at but I shot well and they recommended not adjusting it because of that.

    Now I just have to find some more time to enjoy this new purchase. :)
     
  12. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Something to consider. I used to bow hunt and the compound bows are great. I loved shooting mine. You got good advice to buy form a shop, not on line as a newbie. The bow has to fit first and foremost. Most shops give lessons and it is a good idea to take them. Compound bows are machines and machines can and do break.:eek: Find out what parts are likely to break and get spares.
    Look at getting a good recurved bow for a back up or even your primary. They are harder to shoot well but no moving parts. Simple is better in a SHTF scenario.
     
  13. Cory2

    Cory2 New Member

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    Well... the things that break most often on bows will simply destroy your bow if they break (atleast in compound bows), and that is the string. Also, never EVER dry fire a bow. Bows are nothing like guns. when a gun breaks it usually just stops firing, when a bow breaks it can kill or severely wound you if you are holding it when it happens. I'm not trying to scare you but these are things you have to consider, keep your string waxed and watch for fraying. A little wont hurt anything but if it gets heavy particularly around the knock or the cams then you may want to get it restrung.
     
  14. wmille01

    wmille01 New Member

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    What I did when I wanted to get into bow hunting and shooting I went down to the pawn shop got one that didn't look like it had passed through 7 layers of hell. Then when I could take down a deer at 30 yards I went and bought a better one. Actually I quit using a compound and switched to a bear long re curve that I use for deer season