Looking at a mosin

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by austin92, Jan 17, 2013.

  1. austin92

    austin92 New Member

    1,059
    0
    0
    Don't know much about them, but I'd like to get one. Found one for 130$ and comes with the whole little "kit" and cleaning rod. Just wondering what are some things to look for before I drop the cash. Good or bad years, notorious problems? It's a '42
     
  2. vincent

    vincent New Member

    4,123
    0
    0
    4 things to look for...

    1-Bore

    2-Bore

    3-Bore

    4-Muzzle/Crown-counterboring is not a bad thing (if it's counterbored) but if the muzzle is damaged/worn/nicked, she's not going to be as accurate as it should

    $130 is halfway decent (especially right now)

    No 'notorious' problems sans the 'sticky bolt syndrome' but that's an easy fix should you need to...

    Learn more here...

    http://7.62x54r.net/MosinID/MosinM9130S.htm
     

  3. scottybaccus

    scottybaccus New Member

    114
    0
    0
    A buddy and I picked up a couple for about that much last summer. We found both to be in new, unfired, condition after we cleaned all the grease away. Remove the bolt and look at the bottom side for scratches to get an idea of how many times the bolt has been cycled. Look at the bolt face for tooling marks from it being machined. Look at the magazine follower for wear of rounds being pushed into the chamber. Look at the crown for indications of recrowning. Look at the front sight for wear on the locking lugs that retain the bayonet.

    It's probable that you will find wear in some of these locations if the gun was arsenal refinished, but there were a large number of unissued guns that went through the arsenal refinish even though they had never been issued. The best clue that you might have one of these will be matching seriaal numbers on all the major parts.
     
  4. chuckusaret

    chuckusaret Member

    510
    1
    18
    Vincent is 100% correct on the inspection. I have several that have all matching numbers and several that have all matching numbers with the exception of the butt plate. I prefer the hex receiver over the round receiver. Go to 7.62 X 54.net for tons of info on the Mosin Nagants.
     
  5. TimL2952

    TimL2952 New Member

    1,354
    0
    0
    I bought one over the summer...I had my reserves about them too.

    The cosmo came off a lot easier than most people made it out to be...hot water, let it dry, oil it up well. For the stock, wrap it in a plastic garbage bag and let it sit in the warm sun.

    I'm not a rifle guy by any means and I was hitting targets at 100 yards off-hand with the first 5 rounds through the gun.

    Ammo is still easy to come by...420 rounds in a metal tin for ~$85 and I got 10 brand new stripper clips for $8 on amazon
     
  6. austin92

    austin92 New Member

    1,059
    0
    0
    Thanks for all the info guys. I dont have Internet so I use apps on my phone for forums. No app, no forum or I'd check out that 762x54.net. Why is the hex receiver preferred and also were there any year variations, years to avoid or a more desirable year?
     
  7. rocshaman

    rocshaman New Member

    3,250
    0
    0
    I bought one from Buds Guns recently for $119.00 with the full kit, it was in great shape, bore was great, the numbers matched and it didn't take me to long to clean the cosmoline off. The only problem I had was the bayonet didn't fit right but have that problem fixed now. (From what I can gather a lot of people have that problem.) It's a great gun an a lot of fun to shoot. Keep in mind if you shoot the old military surplus ammo it is corrosive and you'll need to clean your gun after each shooting with hot soapy water or windex and hot water followed by a light oiling afterwards.
     
  8. vincent

    vincent New Member

    4,123
    0
    0
    The hex receiver was used from it's inception to the mid 1930's (until they ran out of them) and is allegedly more durable but that's up for debate. IIRC they switched to the round receiver to conserve metal and it was easier to manufacture.

    To me, the hex just increases the 'cool factor' because the gun is most likely pre-WW2. The Finns used captured/recycled hex receivers in their arsenal re-furbs and M39's so it's not all that uncommon to find a hex with a post 1930's date stamp on it's bbl.

    Variations you ask? A whole metric azz ton of them!! :D Too many to list right now...

    I don't know of any production years to avoid or that are more desirable (other than the older the better for some folks) Unless your dealer has a crate of them and lets you pick and choose, you pretty much get what you get. But like I said earlier, if it's got a good bore, you should be good to go. These things were built to last...(sort of...they are being destroyed in Europe as we speak :mad:)

    If you can get online, spend a few hours on the site I linked, tons of good stuff on there and can give you more info than I can...

    Variations you asked about...couldn't find a bigger pic but you get the idea...:cool:
     

    Attached Files:

  9. cuate

    cuate New Member

    166
    0
    0
    My Mosin 91/30 arrived Christmas before last from a Son with the cleaning kit, sling, & bayonet. The bore was great and bluing and stock finish also good. The trigger pull, however was "hard as a harlot's heart" and cured by ordering a Huber's Concept trigger and installing it.

    With Russian ammo that I also received. It is capable of almost shooting through a 1/2 inch piece of steel ! So for hunting and so forth I recommend ammunition less penetrating as referring to Privi Ammo, usually available at gun stores. I do not know if anyone makes jacketed soft nose ammo. My Mosin is accurate and I like it very well !
     
  10. austin92

    austin92 New Member

    1,059
    0
    0
    Thanks for all the help guys
     
  11. austin92

    austin92 New Member

    1,059
    0
    0
    How do I slide the bolt out to look down the bore?
     
  12. rocshaman

    rocshaman New Member

    3,250
    0
    0
    Pull the trigger back, slide the bolt out
     
  13. TimL2952

    TimL2952 New Member

    1,354
    0
    0
    The hex receiver is characteristic of EARLY war production. During this period the Russians paid more attention to detail and tolerances and they were just "better" rifles all around.

    Late war they were just focused on churning out as many rifles as they could and some even have the dovetail two piece buttstocks that the Japanese ended up doing witht their arisakas.

    My rifle is a 1938 Tula Round receiver. great rifle, cheap and fun to shoot. I strongly suggest that everyone get one...can't go wrong.

    Just make sure to clean the ever-loving sh!t out of it after you shoot. Most surplus ammo is very corrosive.
     
  14. TimL2952

    TimL2952 New Member

    1,354
    0
    0
    to be a little more specific, open the bolt like you were reloading. Once the bolt is in the full backwards position, pull and hold back the trigger and then side the bolt out of the back of the rifle.
     
  15. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

    5,413
    699
    113
    The only fudging the Soviets did on the wartime rifles was skipping the final polishing on the parts. Machining marks are usual on the wartime guns. The older ones, or post war ones are prettier, but not any better, from a function or reliability point of view.

    $120.00 for a arsenal refurbished .30 caliber rifle with more muzzle energy than a 30.06 is a bargain. Keep it original and it will gain in value rapidly.

    The supply of these rifles is thinning out. Those who don't get one will be whining about the prices in the good old days before long.
     
  16. duddie10

    duddie10 New Member

    517
    0
    0
    Im with chainfire on this one. I got my 91/30 about 2 years ago when they where 88bucks. Never looked back and its never failed me once. I just found cases of 762x54r at cabelas in ct. $200 for 880rounds not bad. Blugarian yellow tip.
     
  17. austin92

    austin92 New Member

    1,059
    0
    0
    I really appreciate the help guys. Glad this forum is helpful and guys don't flame people just starting out :) I'm the go to guy for jeeps, but come here for gun info lol
     
  18. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

    6,927
    67
    48
    Here is a pic of a pre war and height of war action side by side. The pre war action is a hex receiver. Metal was polished, teh side wall of the reciever was thinned to save weight. Additional machining is done in the area of the stripper clip guide as well. Also, as you look at the war time receiver you can see that they did not change out milling bits very often, as the receiver looks very roughly ground.

    They work just as well, and during the high point of the war with teh Germans closing in on their factories it is not surprising to see that they went with function over form.

    [​IMG]
     
  19. Mosin

    Mosin Well-Known Member

    7,450
    358
    83
    I like looking for repaired stock damage. (aside from the obligatory crown, barrel, serial numbers).

    I like Mosins with stock damage... Did a grenade hit it? Was it shot? Did it bash the hell out of a German soldier?...who knows.... but it's cool to imagine what kind of history my Mosin went through...