long range shooting

Discussion in 'Competition Shooting' started by Slavano, Oct 20, 2013.

  1. Slavano

    Slavano New Member

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    Hello,

    I am looking at getting into long range compedative shooting and am needing some opinions. I am thinking about starting at 500 to 1000 yards. Also I was recommended the browning x-bolt stainless stalker 7mm as a first gun for this. It is a beautiful gun but I am looking for some peoples thoughts. Lastly does anyone have a good recommendations for a scope that would work for that? I am looking in the $800 range for the scope. Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
     
  2. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

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    Not knowing what you have in mind specifically, here's my $.02:

    1. Find one of the competitions you plan to participate in.
    2. Go out to one.
    3. Watch & talk to the competitors and see what the popular setup is. What are the better shooters using? I'd be shocked if you came away without a good idea of what works well.
    4. Buy something similar.

    Bonus: Going out and talking to people at the competition may get you a lead on a used setup or pieces-parts, with which you can dip a toe into the water at less than full retail.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2013

  3. sniper762

    sniper762 New Member

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    remington 700 heavy barrel in .308...............leupold mk 4 scope
     
  4. lbwar15

    lbwar15 New Member

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    Well I'm in the middle of a 6.5 Grendel build. But it's kinda expensive. What's your budget. The above recommendation would bee a cheaper option.
     
  5. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    I'm contemplating a savage 110 in 7mm. You can pick one up in the $500-$800 range. Just need a scope for it and you should be able to reach out 1200 yards.
     
  6. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    what is your rifle shooting experiance?

    what is the furthest you have shot and accurately at?

    what is your budget for the rifle and scope?

    do you reload or going to use factory loaded ammo?

    how much time do you have to devote to practice?

    what's the largest caliber you have shot in a rifle?

    what are the rules for the particular form of competition shooting you are interested in?

    first of all you need to find out and assess you own skill level with a rifle. find out what the rules are for the type of class you are interested in. see what others are doing in that class and talk to them. they can give you lots of valuable information.

    be prepared to spend lots of time shooting and practicing. ammo to practice with will be expensive if you don't reload, especially for premium match grade ammo. the 7mm Mag can be shoulder thumper, and more so for someone not use to it's recoil. it can cause a lot of problems for a new shooter and factory premium ammo for a 7mm Mag. isn't cheap by any means. if you have never shot past 100 yards, there isn't much possibilty that you will hit accurately at 500 plus yards. quality rifle and scope are going to be needed and ususally will not be cheap. the rifle isand the caliber are less important than the scope. the further you plan on shooting the quality of the lenses become much more important. quality lenses in a good scope are not cheap.
     
  7. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    Look people, I don't care what you do to a hunting rifle it will not be as accurate as a dedicated target rifle. Quit making yourselves look foolish by recommending that someone get involved in competition with a hunting rifle. Honestly, if you don't know there is a difference between a hunting rifle and a target rifle you should refrain from commenting.
     
  8. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    To the OP get a rulebook. Most sanctioned rifle matches specify what equipment you can use.
     
  9. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    please explain these differences then.

    and tell us why a hunting rifle can't be as accurate as target rifle.
     
  10. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    Can a target rifle not be used for hunting?
    I can't hunt with a rifle in my state and I only shoot competitively with bp and hand guns.
     
  11. greydog

    greydog Member

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    One of the more popular long range competitions today is "F" class. "F" class is a class of shooting originally developed by a Canadian target shooter named George Farquharson (The "F" stands for Farquharson). George's intent was multifaceted. He wanted to extend the competitive lives of target shooters who had trouble using iron sights as they aged. He wanted to encourage new shooters to get into long range competition. He wanted to see more developement of rifles and cartridges. More than anything else, he wanted to bring more fun and comraderie into the fullbore arena. With these goals in mind the original rules essentially allowed for any rifle, in any caliber, with any sight, fired from any sort of rest but from the prone position. This class still exists today as the "F" Open class.
    From the outset there were three or four approaches to building and shooting in "F" class. One approach was to simply scope your favourite target rifle, whether a 308 or 223, and put a bipod on it and shoot. A second approach was to use a thousand yard BR rifle; slightly modified for firing prone from a rest or bipod. A third approach was to use a slightly modified varmint rifle using a fast twist barrel to shoot the higher BC bullets needed for long range competition. A fourth approach was to build what would be considered to be a "tactical" rifle and go that way.
    It didn't take long until it was pretty well established that rifles built along BR lines were most likely to produce top scores. This doesn't mean that other rifle configurations couldn't be competitive; just that a BR type rifle, usually in 6BR or one of the 6.5mm cartridges was easiest to shoot well. With this being the case, it wasn't long before "F" class began to be split up into open and restricted classes. The open class stuck pretty well to the original template while the restricted class ( F/TR) mandated a lighter rifle in one of the two NATO chamberings; 5.56 (223 Rem) or 7.62 (308 Win).
    If I wanted to build a winning "F" class rifle today, I would build a rifle in 6BR. I would use one of the Remington clone actions (Stillers are a good choice) or any good BR action and glue it into a McMillan stock which was comfortable to shoot from prone. I prefer to shoot from a rest rather than a bipod. I would make the rifle to weigh about 16 pounds including the scope which would be either a fixed 24x or one of the high powered variables.
    If I wanted to be able to compete in the restricted class, I would build the same rifle but chamber it in 308.
    If I wanted to start out gently (on my pocketbook), I would buy a Savage "F" class rifle in 6BR, put a scope on it, and start going to matches.
    The course of fire for "F" class varies according to what the facilities allow. When I first started shooting "F" class (about fifteen years ago), I was fortunate enough to be able to shoot at a range which ran all the way from 300 to 900 meters and it was an educational experience to learn what my rifle did at the various distances. My first rifle was a 6.5x55 which I built on a Winchester Model 70 action and a McMillan stock. This rifle is still reasonably competitive although, as I said, I would build something different if I was starting out today.
    Costs are what you make them. The bare rifle will run from 1000 to 4000 dollars depending on your approach. A scope will run from 300 to 2000 dollars. Bipod or rest from ten to 400 dollars. Surprisingly enough, you can be absolutely competitive spending at the bottom end. The wind is a great equalizer!
    Today, I have a few rifles. Some are 308's (three of them), one is a 22/250, one 223, one 6BR, one 6.5x55, one 7x57, a 30/40 Krag, a 300 WSM, and a 30/06. I can do pretty well with any of them. I've never spent more than 800 dollars on a scope but do admire those big bucks Nightforce units!
    I have some rifles for which I have two stocks. One stock is made to be fired from a rest while the other allows me to shoot prone with a sling.
    Some clubs promote a factory rifle class and some will have a class geared toward hunting-type rifles. In general, a hunting rifle will simply get too hot when firing strings of from ten to twenty shots. In addition, the recoil will wear on you after a while. GD
     
  12. bradam

    bradam Member

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    Am buying a ticket asap, maybe then I can stop shopping.:D
     
  13. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    a target rifle could be used for hunting, but usually a dedicated target rifle is heavy to help absorb recoil in helping to aid in controlling recoil so as to aid in accuracy. heavy rifles are not usually the best choice for hunting if doing a lot of walking or hiking while hunting as they will tire your out. so yes, they could be used for hunting, but as a general rule, not the best choice. and vice versa, as hunting rifles can be used for target shooting, but they too are not the best choice for that either.
     
  14. Rhodes

    Rhodes New Member

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    This is my stock Remington 700 VTR .308 with nikons new m-308 scope with 800 yard reticle. Got it dialed in at 100 yards. Best group was 3 shots right at 1/2 inch groups. 3/4 average. Back up to 200 yards and getting 1 inch to 1-1/4 inch groups with Federal 168 grain match King BTHP. Going to move on out and shoot in a few weeks. Plan to go to a 1,000 yards if the rifle will go that far. I know a lot of people talk bad about the VTR but I think it is a damn accurate rifle! It's out shooting my sendaro 300 win mag! ImageUploadedByFirearms Talk1395146914.777038.jpg


    Sent from my iPhone using Firearms Talk
     
  15. sniper762

    sniper762 New Member

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    Remington Model 700VS .308 bolt action rifle. This rifle is glass bedded with free-floating barrel topped with a Unertle 10X x 40mm (Vulture) reticule moving scope. It is very accurate with zeroes out to 1000 yards for the M852 168 grain Sierra HPBT Matchking bullet I have used it in several target matches and successfully bagged deer and black bear using my M852's with push pulled Sierra 165 grain Gameking projectiles. (my standing bear mount) and groundhogs with it.

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    200lb black bear shot at 200 yards from a climbing stand 30ft. up a Georgia pine located on the edge of a cutover and a 40 acre bean field in eastern NC. (i could see as far as 600 yards in several directions).

    [​IMG]
     
  16. sniper762

    sniper762 New Member

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    I used the above rifle in "F" class matches (1000 yards) shooting in the 180's out of a possible 200.
     
  17. Rhodes

    Rhodes New Member

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    Nice rifle!!


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