long range shooting

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by opaww, Apr 11, 2011.

  1. opaww

    opaww New Member

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    A lot of people want to shoot long-range rifle, but have no idea what they need or the matrix of shooting that distance.

    Personally I would recommend you start with baby steps and learn to shoot first. Then graduate up the ladder with higher end weapons and scopes. For one reason is cost, of equipment and items needed for shooting. You can get some good mid range rifles and scopes to learn with for $1000 or less. These are good for 100- 600 yards, after that you can use the same equipment but there are better things out there, (at a higher cost).

    Some when they find out the matrix give up on the idea of shooting 1000 yards. Some don’t want to start out small and work up, they just want to go right into hitting the earth someplace out at 1000 yards with a big powerful rifle that cost an arm and 2 legs. Many get disgusted and blame the weapon and scope for their bad shooting.

    Here is just a thought, If you can hit a target constantly at 600 yards with a good .308 rig and a good scope then you should be able to hit a target at 1000 yards from time to time. Though 1000 yards is a very long ways out there it is still not impossible with practice and learning. My goal is to place dime size groups at any range and I am still working on 100 yards at this time. I tend to shake a lot so dime size groups is harder for me.

    I remember a long time ago actually hitting a 12-inch steel-swinging target with a M14 at 1000 yards. It took 3 shots but I did hit it and was elated for the rest of my life. How ever the shooting team leader could hit it 3 out of 5 times. I was happier then a Killer wheal ****ting on its trainer at sea world. Looking back on it I really do wander how I hit the dam thing at all.

    opaww
     
  2. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

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    Good advice. I view 1,000 yard shooting like I do golf, that's why I don't waste my time on either one. :D Some people go out and spend thousands of dollars on equipment and invest zero in lessons. Problem is, if you don't spend years perfecting your shooting you will only be mediocre at best...but just like golf that one great shot keeps you coming back for more.
     

  3. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    My goal is to hit something at 800 yds with my Mosin and its 2.5x PU scope... I figure if the WWII Russian snipers could do it, so can I.... (with some practice, of course! ;) )
     
  4. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    You do realize that the Soviet snipers became famous for urban sniping. 400 meters was a long shot. The ammo you use is the key factor as they did not have specific ammo they were issued. Heavy ball... That is the best.
     
  5. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    OPAWW,

    You are absolutely correct. There is a lot more to that distance shooting than just pulling the trigger! So I too would not suggest that the focus on beginning to shoot a precision rifle is anything over 600 yards and at that working up to that. I believe if you can not get consistent 1/2-3/4 MOA Groups you best stay at the closer ranges. Then you throw in the wind estimation, light, mirage,humidity and other factors which are at best sometimes a SWAG (Scientific Wild Ass-ed Guess) at 1000 yards.
    I have been with units and at 600 yards seen 5 Range Flags all blowing in different directions at the same time. As well as at different velocities!
    So for the new beginner to even think about being proficient at all at 1000 is dreaming. You miss much more than you would like to admit even if you have been on the rifle as I have been since I was 12 YOA. And for a total of 44 years. Still haven't arrived to where I would think I am proficient at 1000 yards. I think I could categorize it as just fun. Though I no longer have the facilities available to shoot it since retiring in 2003. Back in the day! Even a blind squirrel gets a nut once in a while! LOL! I must admit it was a rush as OPAWW said to drill em at 1000! As OPAWW also said for you guys starting! Start at 100 and work your way up. It takes a long time and a lot of study! Or you may just get discouraged and $$$$ poor! Good Luck!
    Just for information:
    My 1000 yard. shooting was done with the following weapons and in order of time span.
    M-14, McMillan 50BMG, Barrett 50BMG, 40X Remington.

    03
     
  6. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    Ive just read that there had been kills at 800 meters. 400 would still be a challenge with that primitive scope!
    from something i read.....
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2011
  7. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    What?

    Get a rifle get a scope find a range and start jerkin that trigger. There is nothing better than trigger time. That is what teaches you dope and how to read with wind. No book can teach you that.

    It is not rocket science. It is lobbing a bullet to a target at 1000 yards.
     
  8. Switchbarrel

    Switchbarrel New Member

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    I came to a disturbing realization when I was going to the range yesterday...
    The value of the 4 long range benchrest rifles in the back of my 2003 Tundra 4x4 exceeded the value of my truck. My 1K BR heavygun.

    [​IMG]

    -Rick
     
  9. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    Rick is that the Bat action?

    What caliber are you shooting? Looks BIG from the size of your ammo boxes....
     
  10. Switchbarrel

    Switchbarrel New Member

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    Yes, it's the 2"x10" BAT action. I'm shooting the rifle as a .284 Shehane in that pic. It's throated for the 175-180gr. bullets. At 58#, it's very comfortable to shoot. I've also got two 6.5x.284 Shehane barrels for it.

    -Rick
     
  11. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    Your article did not post on my reply, but here it is. Zeiss actually helped the Soviets set up the Progress plant in the late 1930's a shared technology. The Soviets produced the PE scope, similar to the Zeiss 1939. When everything was heading down hill the PU was introduced. 30mm tube w/ no bell, but it did have windage adjustments. An 800 meter shot would be the equivalent of 175 meter sight picture and is 875 yards. Think about that. Modern snipers would use a 10x, not a 3.5x scope for that. The Soviets took the best shots and handed them a sniper rifle, there was no training to speak of. Most of the mounts were made in the city where the fighting was happening. So the rifle had the mount attached, the scope fitted and was handed to the "sniper" w/ a few boxes of ammo. There shots were center mass, not head shots. Fielding 400 designated marksmen in a ruined city would be very devastating. You show me a city that you could even take an 800 meter shot, forget the rubble and obstructions in the streets. .
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2011
  12. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    Neat info!!
     
  13. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    Shooting 1000 yard is a commitment most can't or won't make. For years I shot out to 600 yards before I got into the 1000 yard stuff last year. I had always considered myself a fairly good shot and that my trigger technique and position shooting was good. I got with a shooting club while I was having my rifle built and when the rifle was completed I started to shoot with them. I shot at a couple of their practice sessions and was keeping on paper out to 1000 yards but was struggeling with POI consistancy on the target.

    The club puts on a long range clinic every year. Last year I paid my money and signed up for it. At this clinic we had class time then range time with coaches to watch, spot, and correct us newbies. At that clinic I found that I had several habits in sooting techniques that had to go. Mostly it was trigger techniaues and leastly it was positional errors. Positional errors were easy to correct but the "bad" trigger habits that I had gotten away with for many years were and still are difficult to overcome. The more I dry fire parctice and get live fire trigger time the easier it gets overcoming my "bad" trigger techniques. Since this clinic every time I go out I'm seeing continueing improvement every time. (More 10 rings and more X rings) Thats not to say I still don't get fliers on target but I can now usually call POI's before they get to target.


    Reading wind is another skill that IMO is a cross between science and art. Luckly I can nail wind fairly well. However, I keep records of every shot I take and study these records pretty thouroughly between range time. I keep records of temp., barro, humidity, wind, elevations, wind hold off, and the POI on target of every shot I send. I get the targets at the end of the day and we number the POI's with stikey dots we put over the POI's along with the yardage when we pull targets. This helps alot to learn and have good documentation to look back on when shooting again in similar conditions. Developing accurate dope sheets is the key to this endevour IMO.

    A proper rifle set up is also needed for getting out this far and having any chance of scoreing points consistantly. Unfortunately it's quite a spendy affair. I gave my rifle, before I attended the clinic last year, to a friend that has been shooting this long range stuff for near 30 years now to check it out. He proved to me beyond a doubt that the rifle can get the job done, when in the right persons hands, extremely well past 1000 yards. It's me that has to continue on this journey to get to the level of what the rifle can do.

    Also, for me, the learning curve is the most fun part. To be honest I've become terribly addicted to this long range shooting and don't see any time in the near or distant future that I'll put it down.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2011
  14. Switchbarrel

    Switchbarrel New Member

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    Will you be shooting or watching the 600/1000 yard NBRSA Nationals next week at Sac. Valley?

    -Rick
     
  15. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    No, work load wont allow it. I'm self employeed and I'm a bit over loaded with work right now. Going to try to be shooting practice the end of this month but no guarantees.