Long range rifle.

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by Ryadew3468, Oct 8, 2011.

  1. Ryadew3468

    Ryadew3468 New Member

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    Hey guys, my names ryan. Im new to this fourm. im lookinf to get a rifle that i cant shoot long distance with and i wasnt sure which rifle would be a good beginer to start with. Ive recently been looking at a mosin naguant, read a few fourms that say it has recorded 1200 yards with the right person and set up. But ive also looked at the remington 700 in .308. And the calabers .338 winchester and .300 super mag but i dont know about the rifles in those calabers. So, i dk like to see if anyone has some advice or sudjestions for me. Thanks everyone.
    -Ryan
     
  2. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    Well, first off if you want to shoot over 100 yds forget the Nagant-
    The 1200 yd stuff is just that- STUFF :eek:
    Need to be more clear on what you want & what you feel you can really handle-
    My personal favorite is the 308 - But I seldom shoot past 300 yds-
     

  3. Snakedriver

    Snakedriver New Member

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    For longer range .308 Winchester and .30-06 are good calibers because of the wide availability of ammunition including surplus ammo. That said, my long range choice is 7mm Rem. Mag. because I like the flat trajectory and wide range of bullet choices. :cool:
     
  4. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    A new (meaning if you lived and fought with it in the 40's) MN sniper was capable and has been recorded of making 1000+yard headshots.
    Is a brand new shooter going to do this even with a great condition brand new MN sniper rifle? Not a chance, except for maybe luck. It won't happen twice in a row I can promise that.

    Ryan, most good hunting rifles will get you on paper at about 700 yards with some practice. I'd say get a good .223 or .308 and practice your butt off at about 200-300 yards.

    Work your way up after that in range and equipment. At Parris Island they threw us straight on the range shooting 2,3, and 500 yards. It wasn't so bad, at least we had dry fire training, but it would have been better if we were there for about 2 weeks instead of just the one, and had been able to burn much more ammo.

    Weatherby Vanguard in .308 is pretty cheap if your on a budget, and is supposed to be pretty accurate, but I know nothing first hand about this rifle. You could also look at Savage, they are highly recommended by a lot of people.

    Unfortunately there is no magic hollywood gun that always hits what you aim at and never runs out of bullets. :(
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2011
  5. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    the main thing that holds mosins back are the pu scope. its very very very difficult to master. however there are decent no smith mounting systems that will let you attach any modern scope to a mosin.

    the second factor is poor quality ammo for long range shooting. to get the most out of the 7.62x54r you need to handload for it. doing that kinda removes some of the cost factor from the cartridge. the 7.62x54r is one of the very rare exceptions to the rule its cheaper to make your own. reloadable brass for that cartridge is NOT cheap.

    once you get the mount get the dies and brass buy the bullets to load with your easily hitting the cost of one of the middle of the road savages in a easier to obtain quality ammo cartridge...

    yes mosins are very very good rifles but they are not precision cartridges. they can reach out and be effective at very long distance
     
  6. hkusp45

    hkusp45 New Member

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    If you want a 1000 yard gun then glass is more important than the rifle in my opinion. I use a DPMS SASS in .308 for long distance but it's not cheap. I have a upgraded Mosin with good glass on it and it's a consistent deer killer at 300 yards and under but not good enough in my opinion for much further than that.
     
  7. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    this is something that is asked a lot. what are you considering long range shooting? are you going to shoot paper targets or hunt? because there is a huge difference. a miss at 500+ yards on a paper target is just a miss, no big deal. a miss at same distance an a game animal, could wound it, making it IMO, for an unethical hunter. target shooting and hunting are two different types of shooting. most people build rifles for one or the other, but a target rifle could be used for hunting, and vice versa. also what level is your shooting skill? this would be a factor in choosing a caliber and rifle. shooting paper targets at extreme ranges requires a purpose built rifle cabable of long range accuracy, handloading ammo and lots and lots of shooting and skill.
     
  8. Ryadew3468

    Ryadew3468 New Member

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    Thanks alot guys. I know the MN is a cheap gun and optics is important. And i dont expect to make any 1000 shots right away. Just looking for a good beginner gun to start off. Maybe 400-600 yards to start. Im also on kind of a budget. Not looking to spend 500 bucks or more on the gun.
     
  9. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    ryan, check out the Marlin X7 series of rifles and the Savage Axis series of rifles. both are good, inexpensive, accurate rifles to start off with. put a good quality scope n the rifle, and give some thought to reloading, because this is where you can pick up a lot of accuracy from the rifle. check out gun stores and pawn shops for a used Remington M700 or a Winchester M70 if on a budget. good luck.
     
  10. Shade

    Shade New Member

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    I would suggest you look at the Rem 700 in 7mm Rem Mag or a Barrett
    chambered in .50 BMG.
     
  11. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    if you find a Barrett 50 for $500, please let me know, as will buy about twenty of them!
     
  12. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    And I would whine and moan about how much I want it but can't afford it.
     
  13. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    trip, i have to give serious thought on putting my wife on a corner to come up with the money if i didn't have it to get my hands on Barrett's for $500! and i really love my wife!
     
  14. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    She would probably insist that I hit up the corner first! :)
     
  15. Triumphman

    Triumphman Active Member

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    To spend less than $500 on a good long range shooter, you'll almost have to go to a USED rifle in the caliber you want with a good laminate or walnut/birch stock. Anything NEW for less than what you want to spend nowadays will generally come with a plastic stock, which for hunting and just plinking with maybe 10 rounds to see how well it groups on paper is fine. But to do some serious target shooting, you're gonna need a GOOD STOCK for stability and accuracy. Nothing wrong with most barrels/actions of even the least expensive rifles, but the "factory" plastic stocks as I say, just won't stand up to the accuracy that is needed for good, sustained, target shooting, but they are a start for a good, cheaper cost rifle. Also you'll need a good bull barrel on rifle to help with accuracy which generally adds another $150 dollars to cost of rifle. On top of this don't forget about a good light 1# or less trigger pull to also add to accuracy and a "good" scope which will cost probably no less than $300 to get started. Just some food for thought. As to rifles, there's Savage Axis, Stevens 200, Weatherby Vanguard, Mossberg ATR, "older" Marlin XL7 and a few others. Not all these makes can be got with a bull barrel from factory. As to calibers, there's 243, 7mm, 22-250, 308, 25-06, 30-06 for the cheaper rounds, and for a few of these rounds, you also have the option of going for lots more punch over factory loads, but just remember that with more bullet power/speed, also comes more barrel wear over the stock factory ammo, which in turn will probably make you want to seek out more costly barrels or barrel tempering, cryo-freezing, different barrel rifling twists just to name a few. Good Luck
    Del
     
  16. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    triumphman, you need to check out the Marlin X7 series of rifles, these are not cheap "factory" plastic stocks as you put it, neither are the Remington SPS stocks. they are pillar bedded from the factory and are very capable of very good accuracy. i have three Marlin X7's, 25-06, 7mm-08 and a heavy barrel 308, all are very accurate rifles. a person needs to define "long range" accuracy and decide whether shooting paper or hunting. my idea of long range hunting is 400 yards or less, shooting targets, 400+ yards. now i dont think for one minute that you will have a rifle of extreme long range shooting for $500 or less, new or used, regardless of type of stock material, action or barrel. $500 just doesn't get you there IMO! i am at this time, building a long range target rifle. i started with a brand new, bare Remington M700 receiver, bought a heavy recoil lug, will be barreled with a 26" fluted heavy barrel chambered in 6.5mm-06 with a muzzle brake. lots of custom action work done to it. i will have about $3000 just in the rifle and another $1500 in the scope, just to shoot targets. long range accuracy isn't cheap!
     
  17. Snakedriver

    Snakedriver New Member

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    If $500 is your budget look for a Savage 110 or maybe the stainless version, the Model 116. I bought my Savage 116 in 7mm Rem. Mag. for around $400 used and it is probably the most accurate long range rifle I have. The Savages come in all the popular calibers.

    I've dressed mine up for looks, but even with the factory black tupperware stock it was deadly accurate. The scope is a factory installed option that came with the rifle. :cool:
     

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    Last edited: Oct 9, 2011
  18. Triumphman

    Triumphman Active Member

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    Thanks Axxe55 for pointing my ways of a plastic stock. It was the way I had it worded and NOT to be downgrading some plastic(synthetic) stocks. I know Manufacturers have a set pricing on their guns, with some of that pricing going into a stock. A simple Mossberg ATR, while the rifle's action is very good, the plastic stock has a lot to overcome to be a so-called quality stock. The Mossberg 4x4, while being same action with it's laminate stock is more costly and superior in every way from Factory. Then there's the Remington SPS that was built with quality from the start while using a synthetic stock, but you're also paying $700 more for it with $350 just in stock while the synthetic stock for a simple Mossberg costs around $90 from the Factory. Big difference for accuracy. Same for Savage or Marlin, you're paying the costs difference on getting a better/quality stock that these rifles put into their ADs and real life reviews, for how accurate they are, be they plastic, laminate or hardwood stocks. Not saying the actions are inferior in any way, as they are not. Also most plastic stocks are built by Bell & Carlson for these Manufacturers and they make different stocks for a price range and that person pays the price for getting the accuracy they want. Good luck with your rifle build, sounds like a lot of time and thought is going into it for a quality shot. I too have built a couple rifles, but on a smaller scale of 22LR, and 22Magnums, and it does cost for accuracy.
    Del
     
  19. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    triumphman, the synthetic stocks of today are way superior to use to be available from the factory. use to if you wanted a good synthetic stock, you spent 250-400 dollars and bought an aftermarket stock. IMO, the only improvement over a lot of the factory stocks now is to spend at least twice that to see an edge in accuracy. most of the improvement is either better ergonomics, or looks. most of the factory synthetics will probably gain some accuracy with a simple glass bedding job. both of the stocks i have narrowed it down to for my rifle (H-S Precision and McMillen) cost $600-750 for what i want. but as said before, this rifle will be about $3000, and this will be custom build.
     
  20. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    I'd go with the Remington 700 in .308 Win. caliber for starters. More selection of aftermarket products for the Remington 700 than any other brand out there now. Theres good selection of affordable factory target grade ammunition available in this caliber. Critical if you don't reload. Barrel life is good in 308 Win. compaired to some other calibers. Also when it comes to the glass I say "Buy once---Cry once." Meaning spend a little more money for a good scope especially if your going to be getting into long range shooting.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2011