Loc-tite unlocked

Discussion in 'Firearm Accessories & Gear' started by lonyaeger, Oct 16, 2009.

  1. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    Can't get the damned grip bushing unfrozen from the frame. Any hints on how to unlock the Loc-tite?:mad:
     
  2. toolman

    toolman New Member

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    Try localized heat. A soldering gun or pencil-type torch should work ok.
     

  3. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    What color lock tite is it? purple or blue shouldn't require anything but will loosen with heat. Red, any #, will loosen with some heat but they need to be rather warm. If it's green...well....get a torch, a press and pray it will come apart.
     
  4. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    Can't tell what color it is, unfortunately. I have a soldering iron, but not any kind of a torch, so I'll try that. Thanks guys.
     
  5. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    Why would Nighthawk use red, which sounds pretty permanent, on something as simple as a grip bushing? Hope they didn't, I'm just wanting to change my panels from regular-size to slim and have to change out the bushings to allow for the slims.
     
  6. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    I'm not familiar with nighthawks grip bushings but if they're like the inserts that Kimber uses and judging by a quick google search they are, there is no reason they should use anything other then purple. Purple is a small screw, servicable lock tite. Blue is the same but can be used on larger bolts. Light heat from a heat gun, even a hair dryer should be enough to make them let go.

    Yes, red is intended to be permanent for use on any size bolt, think drivetrain of cars/trucks. Green is used to press cylinder sleeves in engines.
     
  7. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    Tried the soldering iron, the highest heat I could deliver to such a tight area, and I could budge the bushings just a little bit. This is unbelievable, and now the bushings are mangled. I guess my only option is to send the frame to Nighthawk now, huh?

    If I'm sending just the frame, do I have to go through the whole FFL routine?
     
  8. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    No. It's to the manufacturer for repairs. You aren't changing ownership.

    I sent my complete Kimber to Robar for coating and they sent it directly back. It was already mine, there was no transfer of owner.

    JD
     
  9. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    JD, does NH stake the bushings?

    Heres what you need;
    1. Vice grips, set light first and if that spins go heavy and break the bushing into pices. Clean up the mess and check the threads.
    2. If threads are questionable (higher probality if staked), run a tap to clean them up. DO NOT use the new bushings to clean the threads! They will become zen with the receiver.
    3. Do yourself a favor and get what us 1911 owners use to frequently change out bushings; the bushing driver and a small tube of blue thread-loc.
    DSCF3681.jpg

    This tool is a MUST for slim/thin bushings! Don't forget to use slim/thin screws or you will contact the mag!

    I got my bushing driver from Alan Smith @ SMITH & ALEXANDER, INC (800)722-1911
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2009
  10. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    Well, I got all but one of them out (of course, the first one I worked on) using the vice-grips. I was surprised to see that the loc-tite was red. I guess that explains some of it.

    They were crappy vice-grips, so I think I'll get a new pair tomorrow with sharper teeth and I bet I'll get the last one. And you better believe I'll get one of those tools....thanks for that....my right hand is like hamburger.

    And I have the slim bushings and screws ready to go from Brownell's.
     
  11. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    Explain this staked bushing to me....Is it not just a double threaded bushing?
     
  12. toolman

    toolman New Member

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    What that means is, after the bushing is tightened, a staking tool (similar to a punch) is used to deform the metal in a few spots around the bushing to prevent the bushing from coming loose. The bushing itself is the same, it's just mechanically locked in place after installation.
     
  13. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    Some manufactures’ will stake the bushings after installation. They simply swedge the inside of the bushing (from the mag void side) after it is seated making it near impossible to back out on its own. This is a similar process to the staking of the plunger tube.

    With the development of high performance anaerobic adhesives this process is losing favor to the much simpler application of thread locker.

    A quick visual check will let you know if your bushings are swedged. Remove the stocks and look at the back side of the bushing. If the inside of the bushing looks flared or has been tapped with a Philips screwdriver, you have staked bushings. This inspection, should it not provide bushing staked info, will allow you to identify the color of the thread-lock used.
     
  14. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    I don't believe they were staked because I got three of them out and, upon looking at the last one from the rear, I can see no evidence of it being staked as you guys described.
     
  15. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    OK, that makes sense. They did that in some automotive applications years ago and they SUCKED. They always broke free in a place where it was impossible to get. I'm not a fan.
     
  16. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    It's almost like the manufacturer is trying to make their grips proprietary. "You're not gonna be changing out OUR bushings!"
     
  17. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    Why do you need to change the bushings? Do different grips us different size bushings? Teach me guys, I've had my Kimber for a couple months.....
     
  18. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    When going to a slim panel like I am, you need to change out the bushings with ones that are made for slims. Otherwise, the bushing/screw could protrude from the top surface of the grip or, worse yet, protrude into the mag on the inside. No bueno.
     
  19. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    Gotcha...The height of the grip is the issue which requires the bushing change. Thanks!
     
  20. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    Nighthawk service

    So I bought a BIGGER soldering iron, 2 sets of badass vice-grips with new sharp pointy teeth (Monty Python reference, Cane), and STILL couldn't budge the little bugger.

    So I sent it off to the nice people at Nighthawk (and they WERE nice). The guy said they should be able to get it back to me within one day after receiving it. He said that, normally, they would only use blue loctite and couldn't explain why one of their people would use red....but that they would make it right for me.

    So far, I'm impressed with Nighthawk. I will keep you posted on how my experience with them turns out.