Loading .223

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by SwampDonkey, Jul 23, 2012.

  1. SwampDonkey

    SwampDonkey New Member

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    Hello everyone I have load data for 55gn spt bullets would the data for a
    55gn fmj be any different? Thanks in advance.
     
  2. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    Safety IS paramount. So I would say look for other sources of data. There is a website that really helped me. I believe it was hogdon.com but I don't remember of the top of my head. You can put in caliber bullet weights. Powder brands. It show you tons of load data.
     

  3. SwampDonkey

    SwampDonkey New Member

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    Thanks for the tip what I have is load data for caliber and bullet weight the only differance between the two is the nose or tip of the bullet. So would the tip differance cause presure variances at all? I wouldnt think so but I perfer to know first.
     
  4. ktmboyz

    ktmboyz New Member

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    Use your own discretion but I recently loaded 55gr hornady soft points and used the fmj data. As always i started with the low end and worked my way up, function was fine in my case buy YMMV
     
  5. masterPsmith

    masterPsmith New Member

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    When in doubt, always consult your loading manual data. With that being said, YES, you can use the same data.


    Jim........
     
  6. steve4102

    steve4102 New Member

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    Load data is not a recipe, it is only a guideline and you will never be able to match published load data components exactly, never.

    It is safe to load same weight bullets of similar design and construction as long as you follow the number one rule of safe handloading. Start Low and Work Up.
     
  7. SwampDonkey

    SwampDonkey New Member

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  8. billt

    billt New Member

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    A lot of manuals like Lyman for example, list multiple bullets from different manufacturers of the same weight with identical powder charge data. This in itself is not "dangerous", but the best method is to start 5% to 7% below max. with this type of data, then work up, giving yourself a slightly bigger "margin" of comfort. I've never had any issues using data like this, but now I rarely do because I'm somewhat of a loading manual whore. I have several dozen that I've collected over the years. So when in doubt I'll usually cross reference data to see if it's falling into the same parameters of charge weight.

    The bottom line is I would have zero problem using the data you've mentioned. The differences in pressure you might encounter will not push anything into the danger zone. This is especially true if it's a newer manual. Most all of them have reduced everything because of the liability issue, along with the fact this nation has become lawyer and sue crazy. The results are softer loads in newer manuals across the board, regardless of caliber.