Linux (Red Hat)

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by Mack Bolan, Aug 26, 2013.

  1. Mack Bolan

    Mack Bolan New Member

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    anyone here dabble in Linux?

    ubuntu? Red Hat?

    I'm trying to expand my computer knowledge a bit and am about to find out just how easy this is to learn so i was wondering if anyone here has been down this road all ready.

    i think the NSA uses a version of Red Hat or one modified for their purposes.:eek:
     
  2. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Linux is not an easy platform to learn without a good GUI of some sort.

    But if Al Gore can run his website with it........:)
     

  3. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    I'll take Linux over windows any day. The best way I can describe it is, Linux is a headache to get started and then everything is great. Windows is a constant migraine.
    **** windows.
     
  4. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    We have Linux (Red Hat) on some computers.

    It can do things that are unthinkable with Windows.
     
  5. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Well... like what?
    How do you get it?
    How do you operate it?
    I'm curious too.
     
  6. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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  7. Pasquanel

    Pasquanel Proud to be an American Supporter

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    I have dabbled with Ubuntu and haven't made the leap yet but it is very intriguing. My computer has three hard drives all a Tera-byte or more so I will be committing one or part of one to a Ubuntu partition
     
  8. scottmac

    scottmac New Member

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    Most of the Linux distributions are full desktop suites, with many/most/all/more of the same utilities and applications as Windows; the names are different.

    Except for some very specialized distributions (firewall, hacker/cracker ...) they have "desktop" GUIs similar to Windows.

    Many distributions can run most Windows apps (using "wine"). Some distributions permit multiple desktops to be active, so you can be running house apps on one, biz apps on another, games on a third, etc., or run everything one one ... You get to choose.

    Linux is also very well documented and supported, often at no charge (biz versions tend to license updates and help desk support).

    If you like Red Hat, try Centos Linux, it is a non-commercial flavor of RH. It uses most of the same modules. Debian is also very popular.

    Don't worry much about initial look & feel, you can make the desktop, colors, fonts, etc any way you want.

    If you see the question about enabling "SE" options, I'd recommend the middle option (not enabled, not disabled) until you have a good understanding. "Report" will pop up a box to let you know when you're doing something it considers risky; if enabled, it would block the action and you wouldn't know why without scanning log files.

    It's not too hard to learn, give it a shot.
     
  9. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    I have a cheap laptop that is mostly used for watching movies. I have one game I try to play, but the computer can't keep up with it. My kid uses it to Skype with his mom every weekend.

    It's practically brand new. My ex had it, and for all intents and purposes, forfeited it in our divorce. I had to restore it to factory condition (deleting ALL added apps and software).

    Would linux or these others be of any use to me?
     
  10. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    I used to have Ubuntu ran on CD without loading to hard drive.

    Kind of a test before you commit setup.
     
  11. DeltaF

    DeltaF New Member

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    Linux is fun to play around with. You can do some extremely freaky things on it. Ubuntu runs great. And if you're into geeky stuff, so does Backtrack. You can download the GUI files. There are tons of how to videos on YouTube. I've never messed around with Red Hat.
     
  12. DrumJunkie

    DrumJunkie New Member

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    There are literally tons of Linux tutorial sites to help with new nix users. Ubuntu seems to be the most user friendly at the moment but things change really fast in the Nix world. I've messed around with it for years off and on. If you want ot check it out and not want to do a full install get a live disc and boot it form a ROM drive. It's slower but if you don't like it you still have your other operating system. Me, I have a few different partitions on hard drives and can boot fdomr any of a few different OS when the mood or need strikes.

    You can really get used to the I Don't have to restart all the time things like with Winders.:D

    http://iso.linuxquestions.org/index.php <-- has many distros of Linux to choose form. There are several different types of just about all of them. That is the deal with open source software. People will like say..Red Hat but they want it do do things a little different so they just decompile it and recompile it. The deal with Linux has always been do what ever you want with it but if you make changes post them. Linux is really the work of many-many people. And it's come a long way. I've seen it as the future of computing for a good while. And after seeing Win 8 I can see the end times for that OS on the horizon.
     
  13. Mack Bolan

    Mack Bolan New Member

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    wow, these are all great and encouraging posts from those who know Linux or have messed with it a little themselves and from those who are also inexperienced and curious like me.

    I did get a free version of ubuntu up and running on a spare machine at work and was amazed how easily and quickly i was able to do so considering i have zero experience with it.

    then a musician friend of mine who does some programming mentioned fedora and red hat, and that the NSA uses their own version of red hat, so that put the bug in me as well. Coincidentally i've been wanting to learn more with respect to IT and network security, rootkits and reverse engineering, and all that so i signed up for an online Linux class to assist me with the learning curve.

    as intimidating as it can be, i am excited about getting back into programming from the shell mode or command line. hopefully i can keep up with it all long enough to get some credible certifications behind my belt. and if not, i'm pretty sure what little i manage to learn will still be useful here at work or just as an individual in this ever increasing cyber age we live in (keeping my wife's and my mobile devices secure:eek:)