Limp Wristing

Discussion in 'Glock Forum' started by BuffaloRider, Aug 7, 2007.

  1. BuffaloRider

    BuffaloRider New Member

    5
    0
    0
    If your wrist is not strong enough to hold the glock or the recoil is too much for you can this cause the slide to jam and make it lock up? Thanks How can you prevent this ? Wrist brace?
     
  2. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,380
    2
    0
    limp wrist

    Switch to a revolver. I worked on a pistol for a friend who was having problems. I could only replicate the problem by holding the gun with thumb and two fingers, crooked wrist (like goose neck ala Charlies Angels).

    Steel framed guns have much less of a propensity for limp wrist related malfunctions as the inertia of the heavy frame prevents movement of the frame inducing malfs.
     

  3. Jay

    Jay New Member

    736
    0
    0
    Technically "limp wristing" won't cause the slide to jam, rather it not allow the slide to go fully to the rear, resulting in a stovepipe, or failure to eject.

    Solution..... make sure the shooter's grip is correct, and practice. You may want to drop down to a smaller caliber until the shooter is used to recoil, and has developed the proper grip. A little bit of "muscle memory" goes a long way. :)
     
  4. jberry

    jberry New Member

    27
    0
    0
    Glocks (at least the 17, 19, 23, 26 & 27) seem to cycle no matter how you hold them -
    Did have trouble with the Desert Eagle in .44mag a few times, though :D
     
  5. Doug1627

    Doug1627 New Member

    197
    0
    0
    Not for the 23. Mine will stove pipe when my brother shoots it. Limp wrist is his problem.
     
  6. Loco40

    Loco40 New Member

    15
    0
    0
    Doug, Sorry about your brother...They say every familay has one. ; )
     
  7. BlueXJ

    BlueXJ New Member

    46
    0
    0
    Is there an exercise that will help strengthen the wrist? I want to strengthen my weak hand for shooting from my weaker side.
     
  8. jeepejeep

    jeepejeep New Member

    695
    0
    0
    My DE in 50 AE is very sensitive to this. Ya really gotta HOLD that sucker!
     
  9. Doug1627

    Doug1627 New Member

    197
    0
    0
    HAHAHA. He has to stick with his 9mm.
     
  10. matt g

    matt g New Member Supporter

    3,865
    0
    0
    It's more the way you hold the pistol than it is arm strength. It is easier to show someone the correct posture than it is to explain it. Chances are that your wrist is rotated outward away from the plain that your wrist bones form and that your grip is too "relaxed".
     
  11. G21.45

    G21.45 New Member

    427
    0
    0
    :rolleyes: The problem is in your brother's support hand! Tell him to jam his SH up tight into the bottom of the trigger guard. Now, apply strong front-to-back pressure to the frame. Then, tell him to pull straight down and back as he fires the pistol. His gun hand, itself, should be fairly relaxed.

    Your brother's other problem is that he hasn't learned how to control recoil. He's allowing the muzzle to climb, more or less, freely when he should be pulling it back down. These things happen fast; and, your proprioceptive body reflexes have to be well tune-in to what you're doing.

    (So, practice!) :D

    Your brother should stop worrying about hitting the target for awhile, and concentrate on shooting the pistol, and learning how the pistol feels when he's doing it right. Think about this formula: 60 percent of the pressure on the pistol's frame should come from the shooter's support hand; and, 40 percent of the pressure on the pistol's frame should be applied, front-to-back, by the shooter's gun hand.

    As a pistol instructor I can tell you that a shooter can't actively control the pistol's muzzle AND limpwrist, all, at the same time. It's either one or the other; so, make up your mind! ;)
     
  12. pistolwhip23

    pistolwhip23 New Member

    23
    0
    0
    usual fix for that is get a girlfriend ;)
    your hand/wrist is getting tired lol
     
  13. brointheknow

    brointheknow New Member

    15
    0
    0
    LOL that's funny
     
  14. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

    12,315
    1,645
    113
    Stove Pipe!

    I just returned from my place in N.W.Pa.Every August,we have what you might call a block party .Good food ,good company,and good local shooters.Every make,model,and caliber pistol known to man.We target and trade and the glocks perform extremely well.I give my G17 to a smallish lady to test and within 3 shots,stove pipe.I clear it and return it to her.3 shots,stove pipe ! I personally have never witness such any glitch,burp,or fart with my G17 before.I clear it,relaod,and fire off 15 rounds as fast as I can pull the triger.Not a fart.I load my G20,hand it to her,1 shot,she drops the gun,I pick it up,stove pipe!!!!!? Both guns had been fired several times by other shooters with no problems through-out the day.I just do not know?????:eek:
     
  15. G21.45

    G21.45 New Member

    427
    0
    0
    :rolleyes: Ok, dango!

    Now, if this were Glock Talk I'd start a big fight by saying this; and, all the Kool-Aid drinkers would be lining up to get a piece of me; ...... but, this isn't Glock Talk; so, I can tell the truth without fear of getting hit up side the head with the internet equivalent of a, 'cyberspace garbage can'. :D

    (Ready?)

    It's not all that hard to limp wrist a Glock. This is because Glock's modified Browning lockup isn't all that strong. Most Glocks are significantly undersprung; and, the slide speeds are very fast. The reason for all of this is because of polymer frame flex and recoil harmonics issues.

    Now, I'm not going to tell you how to make a Glock FTF every time because I think it's a dangerous thing to do; however, anytime I want, I can stovepipe a Glock - Any Glock!

    The good news is that - because of Glock's extremely low bore axis and faster than usual slide speed - THIS RARELY HAPPENS! I already know what your lady friend was doing wrong: She was canting the pistol in her hand so that the backstrap was off-center with the heel of her hand.

    (Probably more toward the thumb than the center of the hand.)

    Next time this happens correct her grip and square up the pistol in her hand. The stovepiping should quickly disappear. ;)
     
  16. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

    12,315
    1,645
    113
    Glad To Be Back !

    My trusty master of advice.Been gone a few weeks and it is good to back on line.Sound advice as usual G25.45 .I think her hand was just to small for the G17 and the G20, just an alfa male joke.To much gun for the little lady.It is a pleasure to get home on occasion.
     
  17. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

    12,315
    1,645
    113
    Oooooops !

    Ooooops on the G25.45. I meant G21.45. :eek:
     
  18. glockfire

    glockfire New Member

    157
    0
    0
    When my wife shoots my 23 she stovepipes it everyonce in awhile. When she shoots her 19, she is fine. Although I cant really feel a recoil difference in the two, stepping down in caliber will help in a limp wristing situation.

    This is why its always important to try before you buy!
     
  19. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

    12,315
    1,645
    113
    There is,but you`ll go blind.:D
     
  20. tech274

    tech274 New Member

    2
    0
    0
    I agree. My 100# daughter shoots mine , no problem. She doesn't have any great wrist strength , but has a good grip.