Lee or RCBS

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by silverado113, Feb 26, 2012.

  1. silverado113

    silverado113 New Member

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    Looking at getting one of the starter kits and I'm leaning towards Lee simply because it's a tad more economical. Does anyone have any issues with their Lee equipment? Or should I just spend the extra money on a RCBS press kit?
     
  2. tiberius10721

    tiberius10721 New Member

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    Ive had a lee turret press for 12 years. It will do everything I need it to do. So far Ive reloaded about 20000 rounds. Sometimes I feel like buying another press but I cant justify it because I have not come across anything my old lee turret press cant do.
     

  3. silverado113

    silverado113 New Member

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    Do you use Lee dies? I have seen mixed reviews on the quality of their dies.
     
  4. flashbang23

    flashbang23 New Member

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    I use a lee turret press with Lyman dies. Works great for me
     
  5. hiwall

    hiwall Active Member

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    I've never used a Lee press but I have used 2 different Lee dies. They worked just fine.
     
  6. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    99 percent of my dies are Lee,I also have dies from RCBS and Redding.
    Lee dies work just as good as the other's do.
    The Lee Classic Turret press is also a great press.You can get one cheap at FactorySales.com.
     
  7. silverado113

    silverado113 New Member

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    I was looking at the Lee Pro 1000 Progressive press. Any opinion on that one?
     
  8. cottontop

    cottontop Guest

    The RCBS Rockchucker is THE best single stage press on the market, hands down. I own dies by Lee, Lyman, Redding, Hornady, Pacific, and RCBS. The RCBS seems to work the best for me. The difference is marginal I suppose, but generally, the RCBS seem to size and seat more uniformally with less effort than the others. I personally believe they are made to closer tolerances than the others, but that's just my opinion. Lee dies and presses are not the best, but they are not the worst either. They are the most economical, however.
    cottontop
     
  9. 7mmstw

    7mmstw New Member

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    Completely agree with cottontop
     
  10. fmj

    fmj New Member

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    have yet to have an issue with my Lee equipment. Dies, press or otherwise.
     
  11. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I have yet to meet anyone who was happy with the Lee progressive press. They make some good products. The dies work well. Most of the molds are fine. The factory crimp die is cool. I have products from Dillon, RCBS, Lyman, Lee, MEC, Magma.
     
  12. fnkytrd

    fnkytrd New Member

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    I haven't bought one yet, but all the old guys at my range are always encouraging me to buy a dillion. I'm actually looking into that one.
     
  13. silverado113

    silverado113 New Member

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    Yeah the Dillons are nice but they run a pretty penny and just starting out I don't want to spend too much and find out it's not for me or blow myself up.
     
  14. 1hole

    1hole New Member

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    ".. looking at the Lee Pro 1000 Progressive press. Any opinion on that one?"

    Silver, it's a good press but no noob needs the complexity of a progressive to learn on. Far too many things are happening at once on a progressive for safety and they're usually tricky to swap calibers on. Leave the various specialty presses until later. The choice of press type depends on what you want to do but the most versatile press is a sturdy single stage; most of us never need anything else!

    All our makers produce good stuff. Lee makes the widest range of presses with something for different needs, it's up to the buyer to choose what he needs and then to use it intelligently. (A lot of people do neither and then blame the tool for their failures!) Fact is, and strong personal brand loyalties and unmeasured impressions of "quality" aside, all presses of similar design that look a lot alike will work alike and will last just as long. Lee's cast iron/steel Clasic Cast single stage is the current superior press of its type, at any price, due to it's better user features (but ignore the bushing die holder system); if the CC had been available when I got my Rock Chucker that's what I would have today.

    Individual impressions of any one brand of dies having 'closer tolerances' without measurements is meaningless. Actually, SAMMI's tolerance specifications are a range, not a specific point. Our makers all work to make dies within that tolerance range, any die inside the tolerance range is fully intolerance and any maker will replace anything that needs to be replaced. All meaning that, on average, there's as much variation between individual dies from the same maker as between makers. Including Lee's.
     
  15. silverado113

    silverado113 New Member

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    Thanks. I just don't want to always be messing with the dies to try and get them right. I'm a fan of finding the right setting and leaving it. What do you think about a noob working on a turret press?
     
  16. 1hole

    1hole New Member

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    IF Lee had made their Classic Cast press back when I got my Rock Chucker my main press would be red. My young freind's CC is a better press than mine, from any perspective, and it still costs less.
     
  17. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    Lee builds some great turret presses,but for a progressive press,I'd step up and buy a better product like the Hornady Lock and Load AP,or the RCBS Pro 2000 press,or a Dillon.
     
  18. stick_man

    stick_man New Member

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    That is EXACTLY the reason I went with the Lee Turret Press close to 30 years ago. Mine is a 3-holer and I have extra turrets. I simply set up the caliber I am going to reload for and lock the dies down. I have a turret for each of the calibers I reload. I use my turret press as a single stage press, batch loading everything. I don't have the auto-indexing option on my press (not that I would use it anyway though). An example is one evening I will size and decap 1000 pcs of .38 special brass. Perhaps the next night, I will use my Lee hand primer to prime the decapped brass. Then, I will run them through the expander die (after rotating the turret to the next die) and put a very slight flare on the case mouth. By the time I am done with doing all that, I have 1000 cases ready to put the powder and bullet in (which I do in one setting). I use a powder measure for dropping the powder into the cases, usually doing those in batches of approximately 50 pcs. I then run a quick visual inspection to make sure all the cases have powder in them and that no double-charges have occurred. Then, I will seat and crimp (if needed) the bullet in place before filling the next batch of brass with powder.

    Using the turret press in such a manner is faster than using a true single stage press but generally not as fast as a fully progressive press. It has worked very well for me in everything from 9mm up through some of the shorter rifle cartridges. The system has held true for well over 75,000 rounds of ammo, mostly .38s and .223

    I still use a single stage press for loading up my '06 brass though.
     
  19. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    The Turret press is the easiest way to load without being a Progressive press.
    I have always used a Turret press,and currently have 2-A Lee Classic,and the Deluxe Turret presses.
    The Classic is a better press,but the Deluxe will give you many years of reliable service.Both have the Auto Index feature that moves the turret plate after each cycle of the arm.
    I only use the Auto Index when I'm loading pistol rounds,and use the presses in a manual mode for rifle rounds.

    Once you setup the dies in the Turret plates,your done.The only changes will be setting the Bullet seating die up when you change bullets,and that only involves turning a knob on the top of the seating die.
    If you buy extra Turret plates,you can change calibers in the press in a matter of seconds.
    I have every die set for each caliber that I load for in a seperate turret plate,they also fit nicely in PVC fittings for plate holders.

    [​IMG]
     
  20. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    I've got to go with RCBS, but only because that's what I have and I have very little experience with Lee. My buddy just went with a Lee classic and I went with an RCBS pro 2000. His press works great and I've been very happy with mine. Comparing the two is sort of like comparing apples to oranges, but both do exactly what they are suppose to. Like the plates on the turret, the pro 2000 also has a removable plate. Once you set your dies just change plates and you never have to adjust dies again.