Lead in semi autos

Discussion in 'Semi-Auto Handguns' started by bestnamever, Feb 23, 2014.

  1. bestnamever

    bestnamever New Member

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    We'll I'm pretty new to reloading, been doing it for about 8 months now.
    I've started reloading for my .45s and I've been using lrn bullets from Speer.

    I've just been told I shouldn't shoot the lead bullets through my semi - autos.

    My question is why?

    They've been working fine , and my pistols are still shooting fine.
    The reason I've been buying lead bullets are #1 they are cheaper ,and #2 I can shoot more often due to the cheaper price.

    Is there anything I should worry about due to using lead rounds?


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  2. aandabooks

    aandabooks New Member

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  3. bestnamever

    bestnamever New Member

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    A guy at the local gun range today, said lead bullets can be bad for the barrel . His reasoning was modern barrels aren't made to be used with lead.

    It's the first time I've heard it , but I want to make sure I'm not somehow harming my barrels.


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  4. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Lead is only problematic if your using a polygonal barrel like a glock or hk usp.

    In those kinds of barrels lead is smeared along the tube building up as more shots are fired until the gun kabooms.

    Standard rifling its only a problem if the bullet is too soft for the speed your firing it.
     
  5. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    Plus 45s are generally slower speeds where leading isn't as much a problem as say 9mms etc would be.


    ^what Jon said
     
  6. bestnamever

    bestnamever New Member

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    Thanks for the good advice guys, I can confidently keep using my lrn bullets


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  7. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    Maybe the experts will chime in, but I have read also that by shooting a mag full of copper jacketed bullets when you are all finished for the day that they will help scrub out the lead in the lans of your barrel, etc

    And you are welcome, Ma'am :D
     
  8. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    I wouldn't do that. Its going to lay copper over lead making cleaning a problem. If your bullets are leading your barrel the mixture is not hard enough or your pushing the bullet too fast or both. In that case your going to need to remove the deposits before shooting copper jacketed rounds.

    Properly made and lubed bullets won't leave lead and it won't matter.
     
  9. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    What he said. If I am running a hotter load w/lead bullets, I may have to use gas checks, but for average .45 ACP pressures, not an issue. Besides the polygonal rifling guns, certain GAS operated guns have specific instructions not to use lead bullets (fouling the gas port) Those are fairly rare guns.

    Why in heaven's name would everybody and his brother that makes bullet MOLDS be making molds in .45? Yes, you met a gen-you-wine doofus. He heard something, remembered part of it, and became an expert.
     
  10. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I shoot lead in everything but my AR15. I even shoot it in my SKS. I just clean the gas system more often.
     
  11. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Rick- the SKS has gas system you could clean with a Q tip! The Ruger 44 Mag carbine- not so easy. Like I said, rare, and they usually tell you in the owner's manual.
     
  12. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    If you do lead up a gas port in an impossible to get to manner there are two ways to clean it.

    You can use the dip that 22lr suppressor folks use which creates a toxic skin absorbant form of lead acetate liquid.

    Or you can use mercury. Mercury binds with lead disolving it. Its doubtful your going to find enough mercury nowadays. It used to be a common gunsmith tool for deleading barrels.

    Either method is toxic and hazardous.
     
  13. rjd3282

    rjd3282 New Member

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    Lead is softer than copper so it would be easier on your barrel.
     
  14. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Range advice is just as knowledgeable as forum advice.
    The difference is one is private and can to be checked out in a forum, while forum advice may or may not check out privately.
     
  15. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    For semi-auto pistols I take an old cleaning brush and cut patches made out of chore boy pot scrubbers. They are the real copper ones. I wrap the patch around the brush. Run it back and forth in the barrel. Good as new in less than a minute.