Kukri Experts??????

Discussion in 'Other Weapons' started by DrGonzo11, Jun 7, 2009.

  1. DrGonzo11

    DrGonzo11 New Member

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    Any Kukri experts out there??? I've got a really cool antique I'd like to get some info if possible. I'll post a pic if anyone can help.
     
  2. warrioroftheland

    warrioroftheland New Member

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    i'd say go ahead and post the pics. i dont know much about these but i'm sure somebody here does.
     

  3. Franciscomv

    Franciscomv New Member

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    I'm a huge khukuri fan, although I wouldn't consider myself an expert on antique khukuris. The blokes from Himalayan Imports (Himalayan Imports / BirGorkha Khukuri (Nepal)) or Khukuri House (Kukri House - khukuri knives dealer from Nepal run by ex-Gurkha Army) might be able to help you out, or at least point you in the right direction. Both are great places to get a nice khukuri, by the way.

    I don't know if it's cool to post links to other forums, so mods feel free to delete the next bit. Over at Knife Forums (Main Index - Knifeforums.com - Intelligent Discussion for the Knife Enthusiast - Powered by FusionBB) they've got a khukuri subforum (called the Khukri Cantina, if I recall correctly) where some really knowledgeable aficionados hang out. Bernard Levine also has a subforum there, he is a true expert on collectibles and antiques, and can probably give you a very precise appraisal.
     
  4. indy_kid

    indy_kid New Member

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    RE: A little more about the Kukri (or Kukris)

    1st Rule: If you pull it, you MUST draw blood. That means cutting yourself if no one else is around (it was a way for the Nepalese to keep folks from playing around with them; kind of like our rules about drawing a firearm - draw only to shoot, shoot only to kill).

    2nd Rule: Use is primarily with an upward diagonal slash, with the option of a downward follow-through.

    I'm not an expert, but I own one. Given the nature of the item, most are probably made for tourists, not for actual use (they are still issued as by the Nepalese, similar to a bayonet).

    Look for a Nepalese website (I'm sure there are one or two) and contact them with a picture. They may have markings distinct to regions or villages, indicating where it may have been made.

    They would have been used by the Khatri Chetri, the warrior caste/clan of the Nepalese. They may use the initials "KC" after one's name to indicate their clan membership. Sherpa is another such clan; those who live in the high mountain valleys, mostly farmers and herders. They took on the jobs of aiding mountaineers at the beginning of the 20th century; there wasn't a tradition of climbing before that.

    The most famous of the KC in recent times was Col. Madan KC, the helicopter pilot who rescued Makalu Gau and Beck Weathers from high off Everest in 1996 (much higher than most thought a helicopter could fly).

    Have fun!
     
  5. Benning Boy

    Benning Boy New Member

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    I concur with Francisco, Himalayan Imports is incredible.

    I would also add Atlanta Cutlery, check the antique section at their site, they carry authentic WW2 Kukris.
     
  6. zhuk

    zhuk New Member

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    Hey great pics.

    I'm reminded (rather sadly) of the Kukri my dad brought back from Burma, when he was in the British Army during WW2 (as one of the famous "Forgotten 14th Army"). When I was about 12, bastard burglers broke into my parents' house and stole it, along with a grandfather clock from 1700-something that had been passed down in her family. Broke my mother's heart.

    But at least they didn't find his medals!


    So thx for the pics. Actually his kukri was in pretty good condition considering...and luckily they never found the Skean Dhu (Scottish Highland knife) so we still have that.
     
  7. Benning Boy

    Benning Boy New Member

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    I still love me some kukhris.

    What, specifically, did you want to know?