Knife trick

Discussion in 'Other Weapons' started by kycol, May 1, 2012.

  1. kycol

    kycol New Member

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    I thought I would share this little trick, and see if anyone else has tried it. Almost 40 years ago I had a case knife that my brother in law gave me for Christmas. I could sharpen it razor shape put it in my pocket and in 2days it would need sharing. It just would not hold an edge. An older man told me to open the blade stick it Ina Irish potato and leave it over night. I did this and it turned the blade darker, but man it would sharpen so sharp it just jumped through anything and everything you put the blade to. And it held its edge seemed like forever. My best friend asked to use my knife and I warned him it was very sharp, he laid a piece of fuel line on the blade and pushed it with his thumb. It jumped through that line and half way through his thumb.
     
  2. kytowboater

    kytowboater Active Member

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    Sounds pretty awesome, wonder if you can use any ole potato.
     

  3. UrbanNinja

    UrbanNinja New Member

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    An Irish potato really isn't a potato at all. Its some kind of coconut snack.
     
  4. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    It sounds like a chemical case hardening. Very interesting.
     
  5. kycol

    kycol New Member

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    Well to tell the truth I really don't know what kind of potato I used, it was what ever my Mom had at the time.
     
  6. UrbanNinja

    UrbanNinja New Member

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    So you assumed it was Irish just because it was a potato? Thats stereotyping man, shame on you. :D

    But it is definitely cool.. what was causing your bade to dull so fast the first time?
     
  7. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    High carbon steel I assume.
     
  8. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    (Ahem) a side note to y'all folks from the Nawth-


    In the south, the potato was traditionally referred to as an Irish Potato- to distinguish it from the Sweet Potato. One of the oldest heirloom varieties was the Irish Cobbler potato. In a like manner, green peas were English Peas, to distinguish them from black eyed peas (aka field peas or Crowder peas)
     
  9. kycol

    kycol New Member

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    I really do not know but I guess the potato changed the properties of the steel.
     
  10. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    Not sure what this process does to help hold an edge but it does force a patina that protects a carbon steel knife blade.

    The physics are as follows;
    The starch in the potato oxidized. The Chlorogenic and Citric acid content in the potato worked on the starch resulting in various chemicals being produced including, but not limited to, Sodium Chlorate I and III and Hydrogen Peroxide. These chemicals then oxidize the steel in the knife in a similar process that is used in gun bluing.

    Different types of potatoes will result in different patina. Different carbon content in the blade will also produce a different patina. No two will be alike.

    This patina can also be forced by using horseradish mustard to to cause the chemical process. Using a flux brush to apply the mustard you can wind up with a patina that resembles Damascus steel.

    Just don't forget to wash the knife after the patina level you want is achieved and then follow up with a good wax for even more protection. I find Renaissance Micro-Crystalline Wax Polish is about as good as it gets.

    [​IMG]

    Have fun protecting your carbon knives!
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2012
  11. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    wonder if thats how the ancient samurai kept their swords sharp...
     
  12. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    kycol,

    I am realy awaiting confirmation on the answer to your question!

    However feeling a little humorous tonight I could not help but post the following:D
    This is a true recipe for Irish Potatoes! But see the below warning!!!

    Irish Potato Recipe:
    1/4 Cup of *Butter*
    1/2 Cup Cream Cheese (8oz)
    *Mix until smooth
    Then Add
    1 Teaspoon of Vanilla Extract to
    4 Cups of Confectioners Sugar
    *Mix until smooth
    Then Add
    2 1/2 Cups of Flaked Coconut
    1 Tablespoon of Ground Cinnamon
    *Mix until smooth.
    Roll the ingredients up into a ball or a potato shape
    Put on a Cookie Sheet and Chill
    You can also once again roll them in some Cinnamon before eating if you wish!

    But Be VEWY VEWY CAFULLL when licking off the KNIFE BLADE!! :D:D:D:D
     
  13. kycol

    kycol New Member

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    Cane that is interesting, but if anyone knew anything about the process I'm not surprised it was you. Thanks for the input
     
  14. kycol

    kycol New Member

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    Sniper if I wasn't diabetic I would be mixing this up right now
     
  15. levelcross

    levelcross New Member

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    Just another bit of good information I have gotten off of this forum. Now I have to go stab some potatoes Irish or not.
     
  16. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Never heard of a Samurai using a potato on his katana, but I do know that "Kono imo!" (You are a potato) is an insult in Japanese. Implies that one is a hayseed, a hick, clumsy, a klutz.
     
  17. Seven

    Seven New Member

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    Do we have to explain everything?

    And to expound, Irish is pronounced "airish." Either you get it, or you don't.
     
  18. kycol

    kycol New Member

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    Does that mean you stuck a knife in a tater
     
  19. Kodeman

    Kodeman Member

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    Canebrake, your pearls of wisdom are greatly appreciated on this and many of the other topics on this forum
    Thanks.
     
  20. Ploofy

    Ploofy New Member

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    Their process involved beeswax I believe. But seeing as how they understood things like the carbon level in steel and how to fold steel, I wouldn't be surprised if they had their own version of an irish potato for a blade.