Knife Sharpening

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by txpossum, May 27, 2013.

  1. txpossum

    txpossum New Member

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    A couple of months ago I was in my local cigar shop. One of the other customers is another long time gun enthusiest and top Bullseye shooter, and pursuant to a prior conversation I brought him an extra Lansky sharpening kit that I had picked up cheap at a gun show.

    One of the younger guys (early 20's) there commented that he could use something like that, as his knife was dull. He pulled it out, and the edge was slightly better than a butterknife. My buddy said, "Give it here", and proceeded to use the Lansky set to put a good edge on it in about 15 minutes, then I took off my leather belt and give it a final stopping. The newly sharpened blade would shave hair off your arm.

    The younger guy acted as if we had performed magic.

    So . . . to the point of this thread. Everyone who owns knives should understand the basics of sharpening, and a good place to start is the "The Razor Edge Book of Sharpening". It does one of the best jobs I've seen of explaining the principles of how to put an edge on a knife, and ax, or other tools. I'd been sharpening knives for 20 years when I first read it, and it improved my techique significantly.

    To me, a "must have" for any outdoorsman's or knife user's library.
     
  2. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    sharpening a knfe is as much an art as it is a skill. personally, i can put a passable edge on a blade! just sharp enough to get the job done, but nothing to brag about.
     

  3. racer_x

    racer_x New Member

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    For me it depends on what metal its made from. Kershaws I can razor edge, Buck, Gerber not so much, Cases go both ways
    But I agree its somwhat of an art form.
     
  4. Daoust_Nat

    Daoust_Nat Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My Father could put a good edge on a knife, a tool or whatever needed it. It is not a gene I inherited. I regularly pay someone to sharpen my cooking cutlery, and buy inexpensive throw away pocket knives because I can screw up an edge. I will have to look for that book.

    I am tired of buying gadgets that don't work!
     
  5. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    We use to have a guy drive around sharpening knives in the local towns. Rang a bell like an ice cream shop. He would sharpen my knives for cheap. It is an art though. I have not seen him in years:(
     
  6. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I use the Lansky, but do not get razor edges. I can achieve a passable edge that holds for a good time, but not as good as I would like.
     
  7. JMAtactical

    JMAtactical New Member

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    I would love some tips on sharpening possum. I am going to order this book
     
  8. racer_x

    racer_x New Member

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    So what is the 'Lansky"?
    I use a flat stone lol
     
  9. tri70

    tri70 New Member

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    I used to work in a Gates plant in the knife room and learned how to sharpen knifes. Good metal makes a world of difference. I use Gerber skinning knives and they have good metal, Buck knives are hard to sharpen and have some of the best metal.
     
  10. gunnut07

    gunnut07 New Member

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    Didn't Dillinger review the Wicked Edge. I bought one and sharpened all my knives over the course of a month. That was about a year ago. All of them even my daily box opening and breaking down knife will still shave hair off your arms.

    Biggest thing I found is to know your steel. Some steels hold a better 17* edge some hold a 30* edge better.
     
  11. txpossum

    txpossum New Member

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    Do you put a double bevel on the blade? Do get a good edge, I don't just sharpen at a single angle on each side until the edge forms a "V" shape. I first sharpen at about a 20 degree angle, then put a secondary bevel at about 30 degress off the first bevel. Sharpen both side until a burr forms, then strop on a piece of leather to remove the burr.
     
  12. KimberFan

    KimberFan New Member

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    As a knife maker, a few things to remember, nothing beats a good ol' wet stone sharpening, I say stay away from those electric motorized knife sharpeners that use a small belt that I see advertised in hardware stores now...my gawd. I saw someone demonstrate the use of one of these little belt sharpeners at an outdoor show and must say, if you can see the contact area during any knife sharpening turn orange, you can bet you're looking at the HEAT take the temper right off your blade. The Lansky sharpeners work well for sure. I don't use any metal to metal carbide type sharpeners, they don't really sharpen, those do a stock removal and tear up a knife edge. I use an EDGE PRO system but, that's something to have if you're in the multiple knife sharpening line and not wanting to keep your pocket knife or kitchen knives sharp only. A good wet stone and a lot of practice will produce a hair popping edge. You just need to work at finding the right angle and hold on it. Once you find it, it's a piece of cake to keep an edge on your blades. Just my two bits.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2013
  13. Fathead00

    Fathead00 New Member

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    I picked up this sharpening stone, but I don't know sh!t about sharpening a knife!!!


    image-806964072.jpg
     
  14. purehavoc

    purehavoc New Member

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    I use a smiths which is like a lansky , I cut my first edge with a couse stone at 20 deg both sides hilt to tip then I do it again at 25 deg withthe course stone lightly, then fine stone stone at 25 deg until its sharp enough to shave with . I dont use any oils either , I used to in the past but it seems like it wears stones faster so I quit and they seem to last longer
     
  15. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Smith's is a great name in sharpening. I personally have a special disdain for diamond though. It's just so damn aggressive.

    I have a Pike Combo stone, 800/1200. I rarely use the 800 side, none of my knives get bad enough to need it. I did use it to sharpen a scrap piece of steel once, just to see if I could...

    I finish my edges with a 20K grit water stone, then strop them on a leather girth strap with polishing compound rubbed in (think flitz, but off brand. I've only recently been able to actually find flitz)
     
  16. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    The concept of using oil is to keep the metal from clogging the pores of the stone. This as per an actual instruction pamphlet I've seen in the past.

    Does it really matter? Not if what works for you, works for you!
     
  17. racer_x

    racer_x New Member

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    Hmmm kinda cool my go to fine stone is a Smiths soft Arkansas lol
     
  18. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    What you need to do is rent these things..! I just happen to have three blades
    27" long and that sure would help..! Eeeek..! :confused:
     
  19. racer_x

    racer_x New Member

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    lol ya Ive been starting to work on longer stuff, parang my go to
     
  20. txpossum

    txpossum New Member

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    The Lansky system doesn't really work on knives that large. The Edge Pro system is based on the same principal and works on larger knives, but I've never personally used it, and don't know the size limits.