Kimber Solo recoil spring

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing Forum' started by 67stingray, Oct 5, 2017.

  1. 67stingray

    67stingray Member

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    Does anyone know if there's a reduced tension recoil spring for the Solo platform? Anybody that has delt with one knows how tough it is to pull back the slide, especially it being of the smaller size. I've looked around and can't seem to find anything but the replacement assembly, which Kimber says should be replaced at 1,000 rounds. Seems to me thats when it would be getting broke in really good.
     
  2. regload

    regload Member

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    That's how Kimbers are: compromised. My BIL has a Solo, which malfunctioned well before the 2000 round mark (the original spring-replacement time) . Besides that, one is limited to 124 and 147 grain bullets. What a bargain, at twice the price.
     

  3. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Interesting find. Go to www.gunbroker.com and search for the Solo. A lot of them for sale and many with "0" bids.

    On the other hand, Kimber is a brand that sells "high", and warranty is "low". Just something that keeps me away from them.
     
  4. 67stingray

    67stingray Member

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    That's all well and good, I understand some of the problems and price of Kimbers. I asked if anyone knew where I could find a lighter spring.
     
  5. 67stingray

    67stingray Member

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    Thanks danf, I think those are the standard springs, not the reduced tension ones.
     
  6. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    there is reason that the springs are as heavy as they are for the smaller pistols, partly due to speed of the slide during recoil and it's short travel.

    so going to a reduced power recoil spring in the Solo could lead to problems in it being able to function properly.

    just something to keep in mind when trying to swap to a lighter recoil spring.
     
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  7. 67stingray

    67stingray Member

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    Thanks for the reply Dallas, the issue I've run into is I have one and it's tension is not to bad but a friend brought me his and it's one of the earlier ones and the spring is stiffer. He was wanting to see if it could be reduced, maybe he needs to run some rounds thru it and see how much it will loosen up with some more breaking in. I don't know if Kimber changed the tension of the spring sometime from the earlier ones to the more recent ones. I plan on contacting Kimber and asking if that's the case.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2017
  8. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    it's very possible they may have went to different spring rate on the newer ones. and contacting Kimber should be the best way of getting that information. i know on a couple of my micro pistols, they have very stout recoil springs. that could be the issue with the Solo as well.
     
  9. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Normally when a company makes such a change, there is a reason.

    Just sayin'
     
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  10. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Another thing, the recoil spring's main job is to return the slide to battery. The combination of the main spring and the recoil spring help to keep felt recoil manageable.

    Take your buddy's gun and measure how much it takes to retract the slide. Both ways. Hammer down and hammer cocked. Now do yours. With the hammer cocked, only the recoil spring is providing resistance. With the hammer down, both springs offer resistance.
     
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  11. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    i have to agree with Mr. Dan on both accounts. if there was change in spring pressure, there had to be a reason or a change in something else that required that change in the spring.

    part of the purpose of changing recoil springs also has to do with the cartridge itself. take three different versions of the 1911 for example. (i'm using the 1911 simply because i'm a little more familiar with them.) a 5" Govt. Model. a 4.25" Commander and a 3" Officer or Micro version. all of them firing the same exact cartridge and yet all three have different size and pressure recoil springs. the Govt. Model having the lightest of the three, and the Micro having the heaviest of them. same cartridge, but way different recoil spring pressures.

    the recoil spring has to account for weight and length of the slide in order for the pistol to operate properly. also another function of the recoil spring is to limit the amount of damage from the slide to frame contact. too light a spring, and increased damage will occur. too heavy a spring and the pistol will not operate correctly, which could result in feeding or ejections issues.

    another thing i have learned, that usually the manufacturer of a pistol usually has a recommended ammo that the pistol will operate with properly. this is many times due to the recoil spring used in the assembly of the pistol. on 1911's you can alter the weight of the recoil spring to account for various different ammo types. heavy bullets or "hot" laods usually require stepping up to a heavier recoil spring, whereas using light loads, or lighter bullets, usually means going with a lighter weight recoil spring.

    if you are planning on sticking with factory ammo, or factory type reloads, i would recommend sticking with the OEM type recoil spring, or equivalent for best performance and operation.
     
  12. 67stingray

    67stingray Member

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    Thanks for the replies fellas, it will probably be a few weeks before I can do the comparisons but will let you know the findings.
     
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  13. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    i'm curious as well as to what differences there are between the two.
     
  14. regload

    regload Member

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    Kimber recommends two types (and ONLY two) of factory ammo: the 124 and 147 grain bullets, for the Solo. They also state that as the springs weaken over time, the said springs should be replaced, regardless. Initially, the round limit was 2000. Now, it's 1000 rounds. Therefore, they do not want anyone using the Solo with a weakened/lighter spring. If someone decides to use a WEAKER spring, from the start, they are literally asking for trouble. I don't understand the confusion some have with this issue, unless it has something to do with the fact that the Solo is priced twice as much as its competitors.