Just wondering...

Discussion in '1911 Forum' started by kenko214, Jul 14, 2008.

  1. kenko214

    kenko214 New Member

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    So is a RIA 1911 the most inexpensive 1911 that you guys would recommend?

    I plan on using the gun for the most part to learn more about it in a more hands-on kind of way as opposed to reading about it and looking at pictures (This would be my first handgun). Taking it to the range, duh. And later on down the road quite possibly use it as a CCW. I do realize that there isn't a 'cure-all' 1911 but I'd like to know what could possibly fit the bill. Oh and I'm a dirt poor college student so...yeah...

    Any input would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. ScottG

    ScottG New Member

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    Well, I don't have one, but I handled one at the last gun show in my area. They look good, but they don't feel the same as an original 1911. I think the grips are too short and I feel a lump under my second finger when I gripped the gun. I tried more than one RIA and they all felt like that. I didn't feel anything like that when I held the original Colt WWI issue or the WWII Remington. In fact the "real" 1911s felt good. If you can find a WWII rebuild and maybe take it to a smith to "tweak" it, that might be better than a clone even though it would cost more.
     

  3. matt g

    matt g New Member Supporter

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    Save a few bucks more and look for something a little more high end, like a Kimber, SIG or Para. It'll be easier to learn on a nicer shooting piece.
     
  4. BigO01

    BigO01 New Member

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    Matt I think you'd be surprised at how accurate and reliable they are .

    On 1911.org guys claim they are just as reliable and sometimes more accurate than Colts and Kimbers they own .

    I owned two Charles Daly's made by Armscor who makes the RIAs and I sold the full size due to financial reasons only my 4 inch Midsized ain't going no where .

    They are very accurate and dependable my midsized hasn't had a fail to fire yet and after replacing the weak factory supplied recoil spring in my full size with a new Wolf 16# one it only stopped when I shot handloaded 200 grain lead semiwadcutters and that was at about a 1% rate .

    If you know anything about 1911's and handloading you should know that the 200 grain lead semiwadcutter design is the hardest to get to feed in a gun with 100% reliability .

    kenko214 I would consider those SAM's I spoke of in the other thread they are reported to be like the RIA's in quality but they just haven't established themselves in America yet due to limited numbers that have been imported .

    I have inspected but not shot about 3-4 of them and they look like a solid weapon . Reports on 1911.org seem to bear this out even with the Commodore I mentioned .

    The Taurus 1911 is getting rave reviews but they seem to have an inferior finish on them "The Blue Ones" and they run close to $600 , I would hold out for a stainless one if I bought a Taurus .

    Here's a pic of my midsized Daly with my bedside flashlight .

    [​IMG]
     
  5. kenko214

    kenko214 New Member

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    Scott: If I never pick up an original or rebuild I won't have to worry about it cause the way the RIA, Taurus, etc... feels will feel 'normal' to me lol. No but really, next time I go out to a gun show I'll look around and hope someone has an old school 1911 I can get a feel for hopefully it won't spoil me lol

    Matt: Yeah big does have a point, and I lurk around the other 1911 forums that's why I keep asking about the RIA cause I don't even re-call the last bad thing about RIA and the majority of the things said about it are good.

    Big: SS Taurus, yeah I'd prefer the SS from Taurus anyways. But you can't go wrong with the good ol' parkerized finish/blue
    Oh and nice midsize, I need to get a flashlight too.
     
  6. BigO01

    BigO01 New Member

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    kenko214 if you need a solid flashlight I highly recommend those Dorcy's .

    That light there has an output of just short of 80 Lumen's which for a home defense light is quite frankly bright as hell .

    The really great thing about the Dorcy's is they use 3 standard AAA batteries in a little cylinder rather than then CR123 batteries that are so expensive and only give you a run time of say 30 minutes .

    I have two of those and have had them now for over 3 years , I used them as work lights and they have been abused to hell and back and still work 100% with a few dings and scratches on them they have even been dropped from 7ft onto a concrete floor and still chuggin away .

    I bought the lights and a few sets of rechargeable batteries and a charger and haven't bought anything since .

    They even have a 120 lumen light out now that uses 6 AAA batteries with a longer handle .

    The one in the picture can be purchased at a Sears store for $40 or on the Sears website .

    The others can be found on CoolFlashlights.com + more I just found out about .
     
  7. kenko214

    kenko214 New Member

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    Once again Big I must thank you, I'll take a look around sears next time I go to the mall