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Hi there, I was searching the net for some info about two rifles we found in my grand fathers basement. I'm wondering the history and the value to determine if I should have insurance on them and just some common knowledge about the rifles.

If I posted the numbers that are stamped on the rifles or posted pictures of them, could anyone give me a ball park on how old they are, where they camer from and the estimated value?

One is a Lakefield .22 caliber and the other has "US Property" stamped on it, is a 303 and has a tiny coat of arms stamped on it.

Would I be able to post pictures of them to gather info or is that not allowed?

Thanks.

Neil
 

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Posting images is certainly permitted -- feel free.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'll post them now.

Thanks. I've seen a few photos here but I wasn't sure if new guys could.
 

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The .303 is a Lee Enfield No4 MK1 That has been sporterized.

EDIT: The US property stamp means it was made by savage arms and was supplied to the UK under the Lend-Lease program during WWII.
 

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Old rifles

Lakefield- inexpensive .22 auto loader, shooter.
Number 4 mark 1 Lee-Enfield, Sporterized, collector value ruined, shooter. .303 british ammo available.
 

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Lakefield- inexpensive .22 auto loader, shooter.
Number 4 mark 1 Lee-Enfield, Sporterized, collector value ruined, shooter. .303 british ammo available.
Would the collector value be ruined because it was modified? Are there any other reasons?

Do you guys have a guess on the value of each rifle?

From looking at this site I would say the .22 is under $200 and the .303 under $300. Is that about right, other than getting an appraisal of course.
 

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The .303 is a Lee Enfield No4 MK1 That has been sporterized.

EDIT: The US property stamp means it was made by savage arms and was supplied to the UK under the Lend-Lease program during WWII.
Alright, that's good info. Are my values about right? $300-ish for the 303 and $200-ish for the .22 caliber?
 

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Sporterized? I assume it means modified, can you expand on that please?
It has a sporterized stock here is a non-sporterized Enfield:
 

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Thanks. Why would someone do that? Lighter? Easier to shoot?
Yep, making it more of a sporting rifle instead of a battle rifle. Oh and the last picture you posted with the number "90C2418" stamped on it if I remember correctly means it was the 902,418th Enfield produced by Savage.
 

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Yep, making it more of a sporting rifle instead of a battle rifle. Oh and the last picture you posted with the number "90C2418" stamped on it if I remember correctly means it was the 902,418th Enfield produced by Savage.
What's the value on them?
 

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I'm not really sure what sporterized Enfields are going for these days. As was mentioned before it ruins the collectors value. I would browse around sites like gunbroker.com and see what you can pull up for comparison.
 

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I'm not really sure what sporterized Enfields are going for these days. As was mentioned before it ruins the collectors value. I would browse around sites like gunbroker.com and see what you can pull up for comparison.
Thanks for the link. Any idea on the .22?

I don't think they're worth enough to put under my house insurance.
 

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value

the 22 is $100-$125 the savage [the S ]is not a colector maybe $150 as a shooter.military must be original condition.
 

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In my area, the Enfields, non sporterized, are still around $200. I'd think yours would be less, but if it's something someone is looking for you can get more. If you have no attachment to them, list on one of the auction sites. No matter the real value, sometimes prices jump because someone wants to beat someone else out of something.

People will cut off excess wood to lighten and some cut down barrels for that reason too. I personally would like to tar and feather anyone who ruins a military weapon like that. Of course, it's not my gun, it's the right of the owner to do what he/she wishes. I've seen some examples of really poor work and I think a rifle deserves better than butchery at the hands of Bubba.

That band around the stock is standard for the rifle, it's not a repair. I assume you thought the band indicates a stock repair.
 

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The thing that gets to me is that there are plenty of sporterized Enfields out there, yet people keep converting them.
 

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Sprotrizing sucks. My dad gave me a rifle his dad had confisgated as a Sheriff. Know one could figure out what it was. I took it apart and realized the bolt action mechanism was archaic. finally figured out (using the internet) that it is a Veterlli not to mention a low serial numbered one to boot. Then came to find out that it was one of many Sears Roebuck bought sporterized and sold for $20 WITH box of ammo.

Probably not worth the amount to ship it anywhere but damn it has has some history. It was made in 1887ish. Wish I could shoot it once.
 
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