Just had the privilege

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by jpattersonnh, Apr 25, 2013.

  1. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    I co-worker just bought a Marlin 336. He was nervous if he had gotten burned. He paid $350.00. It is a 1950 that has seen some use, but not that much. The owner had the barrel reblued as there was a small section near the receiver that had evidence of minor pitting. The butt stock showed a little sanding, but again it was pretty minor. I did 3 coats of BLO on the stock, minor cleaning as it had been gone through very well by someone very recently. I can't tell you the smile on his face when I was done. The rear sight is a ghost ring and front sight had been replaced. What a wonderful overall rifle though. He wanted a '94, but I told him to hold out for a 336. Caliber is .30-30. He hit it out of the park on this purchase. JMHO. I would have preferred a .35, but this was a great buy.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2013
  2. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    I'm envious and I didn't even get to see it! :D

    I love the 94's, but I would've been grinning from ear to ear over that one myself.
     

  3. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    It's a solid rifle that he'll be happy with for years to come. Nicely done.
     
  4. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    You didn't snag us any pics? :(
     
  5. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    from your description of it's condition, the age of the rifle and the price he gave, i think he did just fine.
     
  6. rocshaman

    rocshaman New Member

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    Real good price actually, considering what all's going on these days. I spent about 200 bucks more for a year 2000 model. And that was before the panic set in.
     
  7. eatmydust

    eatmydust New Member

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    IMHO, These guns will appreciate in value over time, if taken good care of. Since Remington took over, Pre-Remlin lever action rifles are being appreciated by hunters and shooters for their quality.

    There is a 1950 Marlin 336 in .35 Rem. caliber for auction with a starting price of $750. I don't know that it will bring that, but there is one person's idea of their value.

    I forgot to mention that the gun is listed on Gunbroker.com.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2013
  8. rocshaman

    rocshaman New Member

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    I've seen both the Remington versions and of course the older Marlins. The Marlin's are just a better made gun, no doubt about it.
     
  9. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    Not my Rifle. I walked him through everything he needed to do to keep it in great shape. I would show him, then have him do it. It will be a solid hunter. I really liked the way it shouldered. My eye lined up perfectly w/ the sights.
     
  10. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    well done, J-Pat. Well done indeed!:)
     
  11. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I know what you mean about the 35 Remington. It was my first rifle and I later found out it would have been the only rifle I ever needed. I sold it to get a more powerful bolt gun.
     
  12. chuckusaret

    chuckusaret Member

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    Depending on condition they have been selling in the neighborhood of $350-$500 at the local gun auction. The going price is for the Marlin produced gun not the Remington produced. Big difference in workmanship, the Marlin being the better.
     
  13. mdauben

    mdauben New Member

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    Given the ever growing demand for "pre-Remlin" 336s I actually think that's a pretty good price. Congrats to your friend on a acquiring a classic hunting rifle that should give good service for the rest of his life. :)
     
  14. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    You need to understand. The .30-30 and being a nice 336 in the north east it is a major find.

    I told him he should be handing it down to his kids. It is in amazing mechanical condition.
     
  15. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    Can't say much. Learning sometimes hurts. Been there, learned.
     
  16. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    J-Pat,

    Ever use the finishing products from "Laurel Valley Forge" for stock finishing? (I got them from Brownell's)

    I haven't done any wood work for 20 years or more, but I sure turned out some beautiful stocks with that stuff.

    Another trick I learned from a gunsmith. Before taking your pretty stock into the field, remove any stock wax and coat the wood with Johnson's "Glo-Coat." This stuff is rock hard. Of course, you remove the Glo-Coat and re-apply stock wax when you get home!;)
     
  17. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    Just use BLO, nothing else.
     
  18. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well I have 336 in 35 I am considering selling. It is an old one in VERY GOOD condition. I got it to hunt with, but found a 'beater' which shoots GREAT so this one has become a gun safe orphan! ;)
     
  19. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This is something I've wrestled with for decades.

    The Marlin is stronger than a Winchester 94. Slightly more accurate, more rugged, just all around a better rifle (albeit a bit heavier)

    But when you pick up a 94,.... the feel....the balance... the light weight,...... the way it just naturally jumps to your shoulder,.......
    and most of all that buttery smooth action..... well,,,,,,,

    I've owned 2 Marlin 336s and one Model 94. I still have the 94.:confused:
     
  20. TekGreg

    TekGreg Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    There's a reason that its predecessor, the Winchester 1873, was deemed "The Gun That Won the West" and that the Model 1894 has been referred to as the "ultimate lever-action design" by firearms historians such as RL Wilson and Hal Herring. Sometimes it's not just marketing. Sometimes something just "feels right."