just a quicky..

Discussion in 'AR-15 Discussion' started by jjfuller1, Aug 31, 2012.

  1. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    what is the benefit of a bull barrel vs a regular barrel on an AR? i know in theory it takes longer to get hot. and longer to cool off. but does it helpso much with the actualy accuracy of an AR?
     
  2. purehavoc

    purehavoc New Member

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    Heavy, heavy, heavy. Looks nice in SS. Threaded makes a nice base for a can ;) .no recoil what so ever.
     

  3. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    I thought this was gonna be tail trail material from the title.
     
  4. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Same advantage that a heavy barrel has on any rifle- stiffer, less whip on firing, greater accuracy. Reason that benchrest shooters have those barrels that look like truck axles, instead of the light sporter barrels.
     
  5. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

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    Somehow I think this entire thread is going to show up in the Freudian thread.
     
  6. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    i dont disclose what happens after dark :cool: hehe

    that helps.. guess i know what im looking for now.
     
  7. AgentTikki

    AgentTikki New Member

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    Heavier barrels are stiffer. Stifness reduces flex. Less variation each shot for better consistency.

    Its not about accuracy. Its all about consistency. Consistency = precision.
     
  8. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    The above posts are correct, but perhaps I can elaborate a bit.

    With a GI profile, thin walled barrel, each shot generates harmonics in the barrel from the torque of the bullet entering the lands and grooves and starting to spin.

    Keep in mind that constant pressure from the explosion that set the bullet off is forcing that round into the lands and grooves at enormous forward pressure and that is resulting in torque.

    That torque is easier to cause subtle changes by vibration the further it gets from the base, which is where the thinner barrel is anchored to the action. Much like a fulcrum, the more distance you get away from the point of contact, the easier it is to make changes.

    With a heavier barrel, you are adding to the stiffness of the barrel, which reduces the ability of the harmonics to make those subtle changes.

    Take a drinking straw in two hands and twist it in your hands with one hand clockwise and one counter-clockwise. Now try to do the same thing with a section of garden hose the same length and you will get the picture. ;)

    JD