Judge says felons can possess guns

Discussion in 'Legal and Activism' started by JWagner, Mar 21, 2013.

  1. JWagner

    JWagner New Member

    598
    0
    0
  2. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

    6,489
    0
    0
    The "Left" after suffering the defeat on an AWB by their own leaders Harry Reid are attacking the NRA. The Democrats blame the NRA for forcing Senator Reid to abandon President Obama on this one.
    They are now claiming the NRA is protecting felons who kill and harm women and children. The "Liberals" never accept blame for anything.;)
     

  3. orangello

    orangello New Member

    19,156
    0
    0
    I like that previous LA statute they quoted; it seemed to limit the prohibition to violent-type felonies as it should be.
     
  4. 1911love

    1911love New Member

    1,488
    0
    0
    I agree with this. Thomas Jefferson said, "No free man shall be debarred the use of arms." I think all free men should have access, even felons. I feel that if you commit a violent crime, murder, rape, robbery, etc you shouldn't be allowed out of prison. These violent people have proven that can't be trusted in society, so keep them locked down. Plain and simple, if you aren't locked up you should have all your rights. But...we don't have room bc we are more concerned with giving drug users mandatory minimums so the real threats are on a revolving door plan.
     
  5. tomgodd

    tomgodd Active Member

    1,236
    1
    38
    +1. If not a violent offender and served their time. I see no problem with them being able to own a firearm. Imo violent offenders should be hanged.
     
  6. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

    6,811
    1
    0
    The ruling is constitutional. Judges must uphold.
     
  7. BigByrd47119

    BigByrd47119 New Member

    3,426
    0
    0
    Its not every day you see a perfect response, but this ladies and gentlmen...this is such!

    Current law creates a second class of citizens which are not permitted their God given right to self defence. A convicted felon not free to use his Second Amendment right should not be free at all. If he has dutifly served his sentence (and his debt to society) he should be as reborn, a free man once more.

    Im noticing a slight up-tick in "good" judges of late! Makes me warm and fuzzy!
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2013
  8. Daoust_Nat

    Daoust_Nat Well-Known Member Supporter

    3,435
    109
    63
    I don't think they can possess, but they don't have to register the gun. If they register a gun they cannot legally have, they testify against themselves, which is protected by the fifth amendment.
     
  9. 1911love

    1911love New Member

    1,488
    0
    0
    Thanks BigByrd!

    Exactly Dao, that's why the NFA applies only to us LACs and not violent felons. Complete BS.
     
  10. DrumJunkie

    DrumJunkie New Member

    4,823
    0
    0
    If I've said it once I've said it a thousand times. If these felons are so dangerous to society that they are not allowed their rights when released they should not be released. I can kind of understand a trial waiting period. But parole pretty much takes care of that. They can have limitations of all kinds there anyway. Once done the person has done their time and paid their debt. If this is not the case then don't release them. Otherwise there is no reason for them not to be free citizens in the true sense of the word.

    I have often wondered if the F word is used so liberally (pun intended) so as to keep people from being free citizens taking people out of almost all aspects of society. No vote, no protection, no problem.:(
     
  11. Mason609

    Mason609 Active Member

    1,850
    0
    36
    Current law does no such thing. I know this is a firearms forum, and apparently most people on here perceive firearms as the only means of protection, but, they aren't.

    Who decides that the debt is paid off? The parole board? Certainly not Society.

    And certainly not the family and loved ones of those that were murdered. Same as most rape victims, they'll never feel any "debt" is paid off.

    Or, are you just referring to instances where the victims were not physically harmed? If so, then what do YOU say to the child that is having nightmares of the boogeyman that broke into his/her house? Went into his/her room?

    Then again, this is all on the false assumption that none of them will be repeat offenders....
     
  12. bluez

    bluez Well-Known Member

    1,655
    79
    48
    "felonies" originally only described the most dangerous crimes committed by people unfit for society.

    But it has been broadened to mean all sorts of things and the term has been extremly diluted.

    But the laws limiting "felons" have stayed

    Nearly everyone in this forum depending how the wind blows might be made a felon by the stroke of a pen.

    Lets approach this in a thinking manner and realize the meaning of "felon" has changed from our parents time.

    PS: Sorry for the typos in my post.. EDITED
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2013
  13. towboater

    towboater Well-Known Member

    4,614
    91
    48
    Yep. It doesn't take much to become a felon now days. I know a young man. When he was 18. His buddies talked him into breaking into someones unattended house and stealing a small safe. They got caught. This was his only offense, yet he is a felon.
     
  14. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

    6,165
    3
    0
    Bingo...

    It's quite rare for Tack to read a post that I can't "improve" upon... ^^THIS^^ is one!

    Well said 1911love!

    Tack
     
  15. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

    6,489
    0
    0
    A very good point. The Felony today is a simple claim by some one that you hit them. We have words that are not PC which can be parlayed into felony counts. Pointing ones finger while saying "Bang"?

    As far as using a sentence to satisfy a victims feeling has never been a part of American Justice. That comes under vengeance not justice. Police officers are being disarmed and fired because a girl friend in High School claims the officer was violent in his youth. Do we need to revisit gun laws and felony, yes. Are felony counts and PC conduct being used for pseudo gun control, of course.:(
     
  16. trip286

    trip286 New Member

    18,658
    1
    0
    I also have to give kudos to this response. Mirrored my thoughts perfectly, and worded them much better than I could.
     
  17. Mason609

    Mason609 Active Member

    1,850
    0
    36
    It's not about satisfying a victim's "feelings". It's about what is and is not actual justice, and who decides that it has been met.

    The entire justice system needs to be revamped, as well as how it is used.
     
  18. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

    6,489
    0
    0
    The system makes mistakes individuals make many mistakes. A justice system based on emotions is called Vigilante Justice. I don't think anyone would want to be judged only by the victims family. :eek:
     
  19. Mason609

    Mason609 Active Member

    1,850
    0
    36
    I'm not talking about being judged by the victim or the victim's family. Nor am I talking about vigilante justice.

    I'm talking about punishments that actually fit the crime.

    You commit a mass murder (like Sandy Hook, VA Tech, etc.), you should be hanged.

    However, when I say that the justice system needs to be revamped, I'm talking more about the activist judges that let things go they shouldn't, and don't allow things they should.

    Also, media coverage should be limited, that way those responsible for ensuring that the guilty party is actually the one being arrested and tried can do so. And that the prosecutors aren't being rushed into trial by the people (like with Casey Anthony).
     
  20. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

    6,489
    0
    0
    The punishment should fit the crime? That is an often quoted statement. Who's vision of the punishment shall we choose? Will the vision of the anti-death penalty churches prevail? Will the very pro-execution factions prevail? :confused: