'Jailhouse Islam' converts gun down U.S. cops

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by sculker, Feb 17, 2009.

  1. sculker

    sculker New Member

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    'Jailhouse Islam' converts gun down U.S. cops
    'This individual was very violent and was bent on killing someone'
    Posted: February 17, 2009
    8:49 pm Eastern

    By Chelsea Schilling
    WorldNetDaily


    Officer John Pawlowski, gunned down by suspected 'jailhouse Islam' convert

    After a man promised to murder a cop in cold blood and then shot him several times, authorities have revealed he is a suspected "jailhouse Islam" convert.

    Rasheed Scrugs, 33, also known as Rasheed Abdulghaffer, shot Philadelphia Police Officer John Pawlowski, 25, with a .357 Magnum he hid in his black, three-quarter length jacket Feb. 13.

    "Pawlowski didn't stand a chance," Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey told Fox 29 News.

    Detectives have been questioning Scrugs' prison friends to find out what motivation he had to kill the five-year veteran police officer. Scrugs reportedly planned to shoot at authorities when they responded to a report of a fight between him and a cab driver at 8:20 p.m.

    "This individual was very violent and was bent on killing someone," Ramsey said.

    Witness Manuel Dias, who works at a nearby newsstand, told detectives Scrugs said, "If you call the cop, I'll kill you and kill the cop."

    The suspect then fired several shots at Pawlowski, hitting him above his bullet-proof vest. The officer fell to the ground, firing one shot before collapsing.

    "As soon as the cop asked him to take his hand out of his pocket to give him something else, he just pulled the gun and shot the cop for no specific reason," Dias said.

    Pawlowski's partner and another officer fired back and wounded Scrugs.


    Rasheed Scrugs (photo: Fox 29 News)

    The suspect refuses to cooperate with detectives. According to the report, he told hospital workers he was high on drugs. Authorities say Scruggs had 19 packets of crack and 19 extra bullets in his pockets.

    "I can't believe I shot a cop," he allegedly told the staff.

    "Well, he's a cold blooded killer is what he is, and he knew exactly what it is he wanted to do," Ramsey told Fox 29 News.

    Ramsey said the killer is believed to have converted in prison to radical Islam, or "jailhouse Islam."

    Scrugs has been arrested nine times for robbery, car theft, weapons offenses and drugs, according to court records. In 1997, he was convicted of armed robbery and sentenced to serve 10 years in prison. However, he was released in 2002, but when he violated parole in 2004, he returned to prison for another year.

    Just hours before the shooting, FBI agents briefed Ramsey about radical Islam and its growing threat to law enforcement.

    (Story continues below)

    "This is a radical form where certainly committing crime and killing police officers and so forth is part of it," Ramsey said.

    The FBI and local Philadelphia authorities are also investigating another case in which an officer was murdered by three bank robbers dressed in female Muslim garb – also suspected to be "jailhouse Islam" converts.


    Sgt. Steve Liczbinski

    Howard Cain and Levon Warner fired at Sgt. Stephen Liczbinski, a 12-year veteran and father of three, with an SKS rifle, striking him several times May 3, 2008. Cain was killed by a K-9 officer while Warner was arrested and charged with murder, robbery, conspiracy and related offenses. Police arrested a third suspect, Eric Floyd, and found $38,000 in cash along with burqas in their vehicle.

    "Since Steve Liczbinski got killed, this issue has really been something that has struck home here in Philadelphia," Ramsey told Fox 29.

    On Sept. 19, 2006, Donald Van Duyn, deputy assistant director for the FBI counterterrorism division, testified before Congress about U.S. prisons presenting opportunities for the proselytizing of Sunni and Shia forms of radical Islam.

    "Prison radicalization primarily occurs through anti-U.S. sermons provided by contract, volunteer, or staff imams, radicalized inmates who gain religious influence, and extremist media," he said. "Ideologies that radicalized inmates appear most often to embrace include or are influenced by the Salafi form of Sunni Islam (including revisionist versions commonly known as 'prison Islam') and an extremist view of Shia Islam similar to that of the government of Iran and Lebanese Hezbollah."

    He said radicalized inmates may feel discriminated against in the U.S. or feel that the nation oppresses Muslims in other parts of the world.

    "The feeling of perceived oppression, combined with their limited knowledge of Islam, especially for the converts, makes this a vulnerable population for extremists looking to radicalize and recruit," he said.


    Howard Cain, Levon Warner and Eric Floyd

    While Van Duyn said many prison converts don't present a threat to national security, some "use the call of Global Jihad as a source of inspiration to recruit others for the purpose of conducting terrorist attacks in the United States."

    A comprehensive assessment based on a survey of nearly 3,000 state and local correctional facilities identified the following trends:

    * Most cases of prison radicalization and recruitment appear to be originated by domestic extremists with few or no foreign connections.

    * Some radicalized Islamic inmates are current or former members of street or prison gangs, indicating an emerging "crossover" trend from gang member to Islamist extremist.

    * Radicalization activity levels appear to be higher in high population areas on the West Coast and in the northeastern United States.

    While authorities continue to investigate Scrugs' suspected affiliation with "jailhouse Islam," officer Pawlowski, the fifth Philadelphia cop gunned down in the line of duty since 2006, leaves behind a wife who is five-months pregnant.

    'Jailhouse Islam' converts gun down U.S. cops
     
  2. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    Arrested 9 times, sentenced to 10 years, released in 5, breaks parole, gets another one - then get's released so he can go and kill a cop in the name of Islam.

    Am I the only here seeing a trend?!

    Look folks - Let me spell it out for you stupid Liberal Pieces of Crap!!

    Islam - By itself is bad news

    Convicted Felons - released from prison, is bad news

    If you put the TWO TOGETHER -

    you have a RECEIPE for WAR on OUR STREETS!!

    DO YOU EVEN CARE ?!?!?!?

    JD
     

  3. falseharmonix

    falseharmonix New Member

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    Okay JD, this is something even I can't argue...

    Whatever happened to the 'Three Strikes' rule I seem to remember hearing about a few years ago? Wasn't it something like 3 felony offenses and you're in for the MANDITORY maximum punishment of your crime?

    I'm not an LEO, perhaps someone can enlighten me (and the rest of us here)
     
  4. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    To quote an old Western, "Some people just need killin'." This scumbag and his Bro's immediately come to mind.
     
  5. sgtdeath66

    sgtdeath66 New Member

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    maybe we do need to drop a bomb on em. how dirty are h-bombs.
     
  6. Bighead

    Bighead New Member

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    I wonder how long before the "Free Rasheed" movement starts...kinda like the murderer of another Philadelphia police officer.

    [​IMG]

    Visit The Official Daniel Faulkner Website to see the truth about Mumia Abu Jamal
     
  7. Shotgun Shooter

    Shotgun Shooter New Member

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    Chair has his name on it. :)

    S.S.
     
  8. bkt

    bkt New Member

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    Sure, we care. If we executed violent felons, as we should, this cop and many other people would be alive today.
     
  9. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    I was more or less talking to the Liberals bkt - I know you guys care, but we are the only ones that see the trend as a problem that needs dealing with, not a social/societal issue that needs money thrown at "education".

    JD
     
  10. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Three strikes is a joke! It is a feel good law that Legislators can use to make themselves look good to their constituants. It is more like three strikes in the first inning, you will get another at bat in the 4th inning and again in the 7th or 8th. Once they commit such a henous crime, they get countless appeals in the 9th inning.
    With prison overcrowding because of countless addicts locked up, they just re-write the rules and let them go. "Oh, but he's on Parole and we will keep track of him." Care to venture a guess how many absconders there are floating around? They simply get tired of dealing with the demands society puts on them via the Parole Officers and quit showing up. After a few months to a few years, they get caught (usually after committing a crime like this) and get another year for a parole violation.
    In Texas, several years ago they built prisons like crazy and started locking people up for A LOT of years. The crime rate went down. Imagine that. Keep the really bad ones in prison and they cannot commit crimes on the street. Of course the crime rate went down, stupid! The Libtards could not understand the connection between actual long prison sentences and reduced crime rate.

    I live in Williamson County, Texas. The MOST conservative County in Texas. The first Possession of Crack Cocaine cae they had, resulted in a 40 year sentence! 40 years for one rock of crack! I guarantee you the criminals know where the County line is. Especially when Travis County (Austin) abuts to the south and the same rock of crack would get you 40 days on probation.
     
  11. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    We have a high percentage of incarcerated people because of several factors. In many countries there are two choices, a short harsh jail/prison term or a short/harsh bullet to the back of the head.

    China has a huge population and executes most felons.

    The numbers are also skewed a bit because of the way they gather the info. If a person goes to jail 15 times a year (a lot of chronic drunks get arrested more often than that) that counts as 15 people in jail. If a convict gets paroled in January and revoked in June (and goes back to prison), that counts as two people in prison. Number and statistics can be skewed to tell the story you want.

    Kind of like the CDC reports on gun deaths. Legitimate self defense with a firearm that results in a death is a "Gun Death". If the Police kill an armed BG and the case is completely cleared by the grandjury, It is still a "Gun Death".
     
  12. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    Then you should move to Maricopa County where your tax dollars will be used in the best possible manner. :p

    Sheriff Joe For The WIN!!

    JD
     
  13. skullcrusher

    skullcrusher New Member

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    I think yardcall is saying what the Libertarians say. Legalize illegal drugs and tax them. What I don't know is if yardcall is for legalization of ALL illegal drugs or just weed. yardcall does love the weed, you know.
     
  14. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    I would agree on the taxing of & regulation of weed, wholeheartedly. I would not, could not support the legalization of cocaine (in any form), methamphetamine, heroin, or LSD. These chemicals can alter a relatively normal person's psyche, temporarily & in the long term. I have had friends who have been changed by each of these substances, short & long term changes (some by more than one substance). Though LSD may not be "addictive", its effects can be very noticeable and lasting & i would hate to think of someone lumping it into the same group of "emotional/physical modifiers/toys" as weed or alcohol. (Yes, i have used most of these substances at one time or another & i do NOT recommend any of them, with the exception of some weed for those wound too tight.)

    I do wish there was a more "cure oriented" place to send true addicts than to regular prisons. It would be nice if all of those people could be "cured" of their dependencies, but i don't know how that could be done. For the record, one of my best friends has been to state prison & said the weed was great and reasonably available; he did indicate some other drugs were available, though he did not use them.
     
  15. Jo da Plumbr

    Jo da Plumbr New Member

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    So far no one has mentioned the fact that this convicted felon had a handgun. Seems as if the gun control laws are as effective as the three strikes plan.
    JdP
     
  16. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Fom Yardall

    "We don't need tougher sentancing we need to stop legislating moraliy."

    I've got news for you, People have been legislating morality for thousands of years. Some of the oldest known writings are legislated morality. The Hammurabi Code, The 10 Commandments, etc. The fact that murder is illegal is legislated morality. Just because a few people do not want to live by the same moral code does not mean we should abolish all laws. Granted there are not a huge group of people that think murder is OK morally. There is a larger group of people that think all "Chemicals" should be legal. There is an even larger group of people that think Marihuana should be legal.

    When the group grows large enough to gain a majority in Congress then that particular "morality" will be legalized.

    Apparently you have never seen the adverse effects of long term Marihuana use (and abuse). I have seen many people's lives really screwed up by Marihuana. It is not a "harmless herb". Granted, it is "probably" no worse than alcohol and tobbacco when used together, but still not harmless.

    As for the harder drugs. I won't even begin to get started there.
     
  17. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    I do have a bit of a cough & a potgut from all the snackie cakes.
     
  18. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    I don't want to debate the morality of drug use. This thread is about a murdering son of a ***** killing a cop. He was a convicted felon, a career criminal and a "Prison Muslim".

    Did he kill the cop because he's a Prison Muslim or because he's a career criminal, I don't know. I have no idea what went on inside his felonious mind.
    Society would be better off if this jerkoff received a 230gr. lead pellet to his excuse for a brain.

    As far as moderate Muslins go, there are no moderate Muslims. The phrase is an oxymoron. And only morons believe it.

    If you are Libertarian and think all drugs should be legalized and taxed, then you are a fool. I agree with many Libertarian concepts, but this and open borders are not them.

    I am a Chemical Dependency counselor in the 'hood. I see the results of drug use daily. My clients are all on parole, probation or have cases with Child Protective Services.

    Families are being destroyed wholesale by drug use. Maybe the Justice System is overbearing, but people must take responsibility for their behavior and the results they create.

    I'm not talking theory here, this is what I see every day. High falutin' ideas and theories don't mean a damn thing.
     
  19. skullcrusher

    skullcrusher New Member

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    Ok, yard, I've got a better understanding here. Addicts that have committed felonies, but rather harmless to support their habits (would never be a criminal without the addiction) should not be put in the same kind of prison as the murder, rapist, et al. I agree to a point. Federally mandated terms are a bit askew. Re: the guy and his horrific crime this thread is about. Personally, I believe that all psycopaths should be put to death, child offenders should be castrated along with serial rapists, drug dealers (I'm talkin' major trafficers) should spend life. Addicts should be given the chance and support to get clean, at least once. Still, we have the most honest (in all) justice system and rights for accused criminals than any other country in the history of Earth. Not perfect, and it does need overhauling (imo), but still the best. I'd rather be wrongly accused of murder in the US than any other country in existence. :cool:
     
  20. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    Oops! Sorry about the threadjack. I'd agree that, from what i read, this guy is a seriously bad person & should not have been roaming free with the rest of society, regardless of his religion or sobriety (or lack thereof). It would be great if there was some kind of foolproof exit interview when people are about to leave prison that could determine if they were very likely to do something else violent & need to be locked up again, so they wouldn't be released to begin with. Unfortunately, i don't know how they could make that work; i also don't see how they could work "potential criminality" into the current system of criminal law in the U.S.