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Those were nice little revolvers- and generally do not have extremely high prices. Have a couple of the hammerless US Revolvers- and I like them.

There are SOME parts available for those (no .38 cylinders, tho)

http://www.gunpartscorp.com/Manufac...6650/USRevolverTopBreak-38250.htm?results=All

emember those are .38 S&W, and not .38 Special. If you send me the serial number, I can give you the year of manufacture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have done a little research on the pistol and found out they were made for .22, .32 and .38 caliber. How would one be able to find out the correct size of ammunition? Serial number 43485
 

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Made in 1913. Third year of production.

Caliber? You could weigh the gun- the .38 S&W version weighed 17 3/4 oz, the .32 version was 12 1/2 oz. We can be pretty sure it is not a .22- wrong number of chambers. Or do it the easy way- try to fit a .38 S&W cartridge in the chamber. If it fits, it is a .38 S&W. If it does not fit, it is a .32 S&W. NO US REVOLVER was a 'black powder" gun- they were all made for smokeless powder.

Originally sold for $11.

Revolver Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Gun accessory


Second from the top is a US Revolver Hammerless Model in .32 S&W.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for the information, there was on thing I was wondering is when I was doing research on the pistol I noticed that the symbol on the grip was an owl and I also noticed on some that there was a design of a target with bollet holes on it.
 

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Two different company trademarks. The Owl's Head is Iver Johnson. Target with holes in it- Harrington and Richardson, a competitor.
 

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Those little pistols are pretty durable. A friend has a .32. Looking at it one would think it is out of time. But the little gun still shoots great. He inherited the gun from his grandfather and carries it every day. Thanks to that little gun his grandfather lived a long life, despite his rough and tumble ways.
 

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Yea there is little work that has to be done but we are going to be taking it to a local gun smith that we know way before anything is going to be fired out of it
 

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For c3shooter;

I have read many posts on various forums and have seen several comments on early US Revolvers using parts left over when IJ began making Model 3's (smokeless powder). Supposedly, the first 14,XXX or so made used old IJ Model 2 cylinders designed for black powder (BP) loads. After the initial run the metal used for the cylinders was upgraded and supposedly OK for smokeless. I reload using both American Patriot Powder (APP) and FFF BP and have had nothing but fun. I have two circa 1910 US revolvers, 32 hammer less and a 38 with hammer both having sn's in the 4 digits. Both are good shooters and surprisingly well made, in better condition than some Model 3 IJs I have in the stable. Also, I have fired both 32 & 38 S&W made by Remington and Winchester in older IJs, H&Rs, and S&Ws without any problems. Supposedly both brands are run once a year and are loaded to lower pressures purposely for use in old top breaks. When in doubt I have a gunsmith check them out before firing (goooood idea) and fire sparingly. Too much firing will stretch the frame and get them out of time.

Best bet, get it checked.


Sent from my iPad using Firearms Talk
 

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MrDutton

I have my grandfather's two Ivers he left me upon passing. He kept them in his little grocery store but I would certainly be afraid to fire either of them. They are both in 32 cal.
You jogged my memory I need to get them out just for old time sake!
03
 

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Michael- Do not confuse w/ US Revolver Co. (1910-1935) which was a trade name of Iver Johnson's with the US Pistol Company.
US Pistol Co was an entirely different firm and was owned by Otis A. Smith. The company was out of the gun business by 1899 (switching to tools) The guns were designed for low pressure Black Powder cartridges only.

For all that have an interest in Iver Johnson Firearms, get the book by the late (may he rest in peace) Mr. William Goforth. Right at the time of his death he published his lifelong accumulation of notes on the IJs. Unfortunately, US Pistol was a short lived company, and there is no definitive source of production data, as was common to many low cost firearms.
 

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Funny this should pop up today. Last week there was an estate sale bill that had a couple Iver Johnsons on it.

One was a .22, do they shoot .22lr? it was an 8 shot. Super shot sealed 8 I believe.

The second stated it was a 2nd model safety automatic hammer .32S&W DA. Is that particularly different than other revolvers?

Also had a IMP .22s DA. Never heard of one of them.
 

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Mike- the serial number should either be numbers only, or letter D, E or F and a number. Remove grips, serial number stamped left side grip strap.

Youngridge, the Supershot Sealed 8 was indeed 22 LR, and a very good revolver. Some reading for you- https://www.americanrifleman.org/articles/2012/4/19/iver-johnson-22-supershot-sealed-eight/

The term Safety Automatic Hammer referred to the use of a transfer bar system. If the hammer was NOT in the cocked position, whacking the hammer with a brick would NOT cause the firing pin to strike the primer. Remember the early Colt Single Actions could not be safely carried with a loaded chamber under the hammer? The Iver's could. http://www.guns.com/2013/04/20/iver-johnson-safety-revolvers-glorious-contradictions/
 

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Regarding the IMP- imagine the cheapest, poorest quality 22 revolver you can imagine. Then make a copy of it.

The IMP was made by "Imperial Metal Products"* in Kinston, NC. It is a copy of the RG-10, made in the U.S. after GCA '68 banned import of the German gun. AFAIK, the frame was U.S. made, the other parts were imported from Germany.

Unbelievable as it sounds, they were even worse than the German guns, being made of poorer quality materials and not being subjected to German proof.
 

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Slysir- VERY nice- and no reason not to shoot it! I have a little .32 hammerless from 1900 that does not appear to have been fired (yet).
 
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