Is your AR, your primary home defense weapon?

Discussion in 'AR-15 Discussion' started by connectegr, Jun 28, 2012.

  1. connectegr

    connectegr New Member

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    Reading the #3 Recoil magazine, they make a strong suggestion that a rifle be your primary home defense weapon. With handgun second and shotgun as the final choice. I practice shooting house drills with my AR and handgun. But, when I get home my rifle stays in the case, and my handgun goes in a biometric safe. Is this article just AR sales propaganda? Should I keep my AR on the ready at home? What do you do?
     
  2. ktmboyz

    ktmboyz New Member

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    The handgun is for fighting your way to the long gun or to be used when the long gun goes down during a fight. Do you practice transitions at the range ? Load two or three rounds in the long gun or use snap caps, when the rifle goes dry transition to the handgun and re engage.

    The best answer is prob what works for you, do you live in an apt with someone on the other side of the wall ? Do you have enough room in your home to navigate safely with a long gun? Is it equiped wiht a white light of some sort ?

    There are a lot of things that need to be considered when planning you home defense scenario for an emergency.
     

  3. Quentin

    Quentin New Member

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    No, though I know there are good arguments for it. I do keep 10 mags loaded but the ARs are not my primaries. I like handguns in the home because they're maneuverable and easier to operate with one hand, if necessary. May be bad logic but the way I've done it for 40 some years.
     
  4. AgentTikki

    AgentTikki New Member

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    Get the best of both worlds, sbr / ar pistol.
     
  5. connectegr

    connectegr New Member

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    I don't practice transitions enough. The shooting house drills are kinda shock and awe, individual or two man teams with 3 or 4 targets. A transition would certainly be practical in the case of a malfunction. I have shot IDPA stages that required transition from rifle to handgun and primary handgun to backup. Sounds like a good suggestion for a day at the range.
     
  6. ktmboyz

    ktmboyz New Member

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    I always try to mix in some drills when I go to the range. The one I don't do enough is weak hand shooting. I always have good intentions but then forget :eek:
     
  7. purehavoc

    purehavoc New Member

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    My ARs are in the safe , I do keep several handguns close that are ready to go . so I guess my .40 and 9mm are my home go to until I can get the safe open ;)
     
  8. connectegr

    connectegr New Member

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    I don't practice weak hand enough either, especially with my AR. Weak hand or "loss of strong hand" is a frequent scenario in IDPA. One handed reload, etc. My reaction is always aw $hi_.
     
  9. MikeJK

    MikeJK New Member

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    I would prefer an AR sitting next to my bed but w/ a 4 y/o it isn't an option. An AR is by far the best choice. It points better/faster, allows for faster follow-up shots, and larger magazine capacity.
     
  10. buffalolake

    buffalolake New Member

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    I keep all of my guns locked away when they are not being used. For my pistol, I've got a Gunvault micro that is biometric. Because of its design, I can easily find it and open it in the dark, so the pistol is my default for anything in the house. Anything outside of the house I use the Mossberg chainsaw. We live in the country and have problems with raccoons, opossums, stray dogs, coyotes, ect. When you spot them, you've only got a second or two to fire before they dissapear into the trees. I always take an extra second to verify that I'm not about to shoot a family pet, that doesn't leave enough time to aim a rifle. My mossberg chainsaw has a combination flashlight/lasersight and is designed to be shot from the hip, making it very effective for my needs.
     
  11. sputnik1988

    sputnik1988 Active Member

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    If KB and the rest of the spetznaz are knocking down your door, then yeah, as for one or two guys... I can honestly see no reason why a rifle is needed.
     
  12. powell0892

    powell0892 New Member

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    I just keep my Glock next to the bed I wanted a few more rounds so I went and bought the 33rd mag for it, looks kinda stupid but I dont think the guy looking down barrel of my gun would notice that it looks dumb. I have a large house but there is only the width of a driveway seperating me from my neighbors so it worries me to use a rifle.
     
  13. tiberius10721

    tiberius10721 New Member

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  14. MikeJK

    MikeJK New Member

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    I'm no expert and I've never claimed to be but I am fully stocked on common sense. A pistol even with a red dot sight will never be as fast aim as a rifle. And if you're not aiming you're being irresponsible regardless of the situation as is firing your shotgun from the hip. This isn't Gunsmoke tex. And good luck with your gun vault biometric or not. Haw far is your bed from you bedroom door. Exactly. Not far enough to ger your barings, get you firearm out of your safe, then defend yourself.
     
  15. Wilder

    Wilder New Member

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    Using low weight, high velocity varmint rounds in a .223/5.56 penetrates fewer walls, and breaks apart much faster than handgun rounds, or 00 buck. Bird shot is defeated too easily by heavy clothing to be effective. Handgun bullets are usually designed to penetrate. Most penetration tests I've seen show those little screamers are a lot safer for your neighbors. Some of these tests have been done with .380, and I saw one smaller but forget what caliber it was.
    If you live in an apartment your immediate neighbors are in danger no matter what gun you use. Same for anyone in your house (assuming common modern construction). So practice, think while practicing where your bullets will go. They don't always keep a straight line after hitting a wall. Search for home defense ballistic tests, ar vs whatever for home defense, on youtube. There are a number of them.
    I keep an ar and a pistol handy at home. Although I do sometimes alternate the shotgun in, hard to argue with a 12ga pump... At the end of the day I try to remind myself, that it was the decision of the bad guy in my home which endangered my neighbors - not my choice of weapon. Use what works best for you, and that you have lots of practice with.
     
  16. shootitout

    shootitout New Member

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    Iv got 2 dogs that way 125 and 145 and I have never had any problem with my shotgun and I'm used to them so i think its more personal preference because how often do u hear about 10 people storming someones house its most of the time 1-3 or 4 people so the shotgun with 8 rounds is more then enough.
    But do what u like.
     
  17. shootitout

    shootitout New Member

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    Sry for the double post but I also wanted to say that I'm not to concerned about over penetration because I live in an old brick house and my neighbors are far away
     
  18. buffalolake

    buffalolake New Member

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    I have kids, so keeping a loaded rifle in the bedroom would be more than irresponsible. Rifles and shotguns have to be kept unloaded and locked away. My biometric safe allows me to keep a loaded handgun on the nightstand next to the bed, yet safely locked away from the kids. Only my fingerprint can open it.

    As for shooting the shotgun from the hip, I live in a very heavily forrested area. To the east and west, it is over 2 miles of trees and rolling hills to the next house. To the north it is 1/2 mile of dense trees and brush to the next house. Other family members have a house 200 yards to the south, but I never fire in that direction. The animals that kill our chickens, tear up our property, and attack our pets come from the east. And all there is that direction is a chicken coop and trees. I have tried using rifles and hunting shotguns in the past, but it's just not effective. If you take the time to verify that you are shooting a nuisance animal, and not the family dog, you will have time for 1 shot before the animal gets away. When I talk about firing this thing from the hip, I am sighting with the laser. I am using the flashlight to see the target and verify what I am about to shoot, and I am putting the laser on the target before I fire. I am also shooting at something running on the ground about 30 feet away. I'm not just firing wildly with no concern about where my projectiles go. I was brought up with the belief that you never pull the trigger unless you know what is behind your target, where the bullets are going to go if you miss.

    I don't live a city. Bullets don't riccochet off of trees and dirt like they do off of pavement and bricks.
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2012
  19. AgentTikki

    AgentTikki New Member

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    My vote is having an AR for my primary goto.
     
  20. Wilder

    Wilder New Member

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    Gun fight rule #1 - Bring enough gun.
    Bring all your friends with guns.
    I read about a pregnant woman who found an armed intruder in her home. Holding her 12ga on him she calmly stated that hers was bigger. He put down his gun and laid there until the cops showed up.
    Connectegr- Basically do what you are comfortable with, we all worry about collateral damage or we wouldn't think about or discuss these scenarios. I always like to discuss this to learn new perspectives and ideas. It is a tough, and personal decision to balance having enough protection and endangering innocent people in the area. A lot of times when a homer owner confronts an intruder in their homes, the criminal is outgunned and out trained. That intimidation factor can often end a situation without a shot fired.
    Criminals fear us. Cops will try to take them alive, citizens are not usually willing to take that risk. And they know it. If, god forbid it happen, I ever find myself in one of these situations; I want my uninvited guest to look at me and think, "F my life."