Is it possible for 600-900 for a good safe

Discussion in 'Gun Safes' started by dc9mm, Nov 22, 2018.

  1. dc9mm

    dc9mm New Member

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    Right now I have a old safe/cabinet that is just metal 12 gauge .10 inch thick that has a channel lock for door and a meadco key to open it. I need more room and would like some fire proof rating to it,. But the most I can spend is 900. I have seen safes like the Liberty Centurion 18 (599 at Gander) but then I see it ONLY uses 14 gauge metal. Thats thinner than my current safe/cabinet . What I have now I never thought was very good but at least its 12 gauge every were. The ones I have found that have heavy gauge like gauge 10 (.1406 thick) are all in the 1400 and up range. I want to hold 4 maybe 5 rifles with scopes and 6 or 7 handguns. I dont keep ammo in the safe.

    Do they make such a safe? Or am I stuck having to wait till I can save up 1400 to get one? But then I see another 400 gets me even thicker steel.

    I have been watching youtube videos were they cut like butter through even 12 gauge like i have now let alone thinner 14 gauge. Useless safes.
     
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  2. dwmiller

    dwmiller Well-Known Member

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    Easiest way to increase fire rating is to add some cement to the outside of the boxes. Best is an enclosure made of concrete filled block with rebar and a concrete 4" roof on it. Spend your money on a vault door only. As you've seen modern tools cut any thickness of metal you could use. Conceal instead of protect is the best idea.

    I've got a 4' x 12' closet that was built with block walls and capped with a concrete slab. Door is a solid steel security door, factory style, with a heavy steel frame that can open from the inside with a hand bar. It's all hidden behind book cases. I've got several stack on boxes in there, just to organize things. This doubles as a storm shelter and saves me on insurance. Paid for itself in lower deductibles in two years.
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2018
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  3. dc9mm

    dc9mm New Member

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    I just dont have any room like that. Building one is not in my ability. A safe of some sort is my only option now.


     
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  4. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Well-Known Member

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    You won't find anything "Heavy Duty" at a box store. Gun safes in general are cheaply made sheet metal boxes with a sturdy door on the front of them. Anyone with a sawzall or grinder with a cutoff wheel on it can just cut a hole in the side/top of the safe and take what they want out of it.
    If you want a real safe,go see a real safe company.But,be prepared for a shock when they give you the price,it will be several thousand $$$$.
     
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  5. dc9mm

    dc9mm New Member

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    So it sounds like it can't be done without spending BIG BUCKS on a safe.

     
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  6. towboater

    towboater Well-Known Member

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    Ya can get a decent safe and surround it with cement block for added fire/theft protection.
     
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  7. dc9mm

    dc9mm New Member

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    Yea it looks like the best deal is get one with a good door then surround it with something. Protecting the weak body. Even looking in the 1400 range most were only 12 gauge which is what I have now. Did see some 9 gauge. I always thought those big 1300 dollar safes were like 1/4 inch plate. What a surprise there really thin.

     
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  8. dc9mm

    dc9mm New Member

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    After searching for a week it looks like you need to spend at a minimum 2300. Fort Knox or a Sturdy safe have good models. Starting in that price range. Other wise you will get 14 or 12 gauge metal which is easily defeated with hand tools. Power tools destroy those safes. Circular saw buzzes right through the body in seconds. But 12 gauge will bend to easy from pry bars. Let alone most in the 900 range that are 14 gauge. Fake you out with a 4 inch door that is fiber board. I have to save up longer, my current 12 gauge metal box will do for now.
     
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  9. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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  10. dc9mm

    dc9mm New Member

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    You do realize those safes you mention are paper thin most likely 14 gauge as they dont even say what the thickness of the metal is. When they dont say 14 or even thinner is it. Don't let the 4 inch thick door fool you. I was shocked myself until I started looking into getting a safe. You can take a hammer and break into those. One pry bar and pop off the door. Your fooling yourself if you think that is GOOD. Winchester are one of the worst rated safes out there. Cheap Chinese junk. Iam not asking for super duty 16 grand safe but like I said a safe that can stand up to at least a half hour of attack would be good. That would be in the 2300 dollar range at a minimum.
    Plus from my research I would avoid an electronic lock.

    The only safe at tractor supply worth looking at is this one https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/p...-safe-with-60-minute-fire-rating?cm_vc=-10005

    It has a 1/4 inch thick steel door but the body is still only 11 gauge or 1/8 inch. Not to bad but its $2039 plus shipping.
     
  11. Ghost1958

    Ghost1958 Well-Known Member

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    A safe or lock will stop an honest thief. To a determined one a safe screams "bust me open I'm full of goodies.
    Unless you buy a bank vault, out of sight out of mind works real well. As in hidden.
     
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  12. formerCav

    formerCav Well-Known Member

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    there are a few outfits out there that make a modular safe.
    it comes to you in steel plates 1/2 thick or so and you assemble the walls, floor, and door of it piece by piece.
    here is one
    http://zanottiarmor.com
    or just google modular safes...
     
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  13. dc9mm

    dc9mm New Member

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    That Zanotti safe looks really good. Wish it has some fire proofing I wonder if I could put drywall fitted myself really tightly would make it some what fireproof. Most fire rated safes only use drywall. I would think the walls would be easy to do BUT the door would be the problem. At least it has decent thickness on the metal All these so called safes under 2 grand have paper thin metal.
     
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  14. formerCav

    formerCav Well-Known Member

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    buy firebrick at a fireplace store. YOu LOSE some room if you put them on the inside walls of the safe. Or, put them on the outside and figure a way to secure them
     
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  15. oO_Rogue_Oo

    oO_Rogue_Oo Well-Known Member

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    Most gun safes are not much more than security cabinets. For handguns (You can usually store ARs in them too especially if you separate the upper and lowers) you are MUCH better off buying a high end secure filing cabinet. They are made with thicker construction and the locks tend to be of better quality. Also the fire ratings tend to be better. Long guns is where the issue comes in. Anything over 47" or so in length won't fit in a lateral filing cabinet.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2018
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  16. oO_Rogue_Oo

    oO_Rogue_Oo Well-Known Member

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    How are you supposed to open it after that? If you don't have 360 degree coverage you haven't improved its fire resistance.
     
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  17. oO_Rogue_Oo

    oO_Rogue_Oo Well-Known Member

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    If you want to get a better understanding of fire resistance take a look at document safes or data safes (such as for storing data backup tapes). The one I have at home is a safe within a safe with concrete in between. And it is a mid grade document safe at best. The actual storage capacity is slightly less than 12"x12" (exterior is more like 24"x24") and it was over $2k ten years ago.
     
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  18. jigs-n-fixture

    jigs-n-fixture Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Fire resistance is generally worthless. During a fire the safe gets hot. When the firefighters spray water on the fire it generates lots of steam. As the safe cools, the steam gets pulled in. The steam corrodes everything in the safe.
     
  19. dc9mm

    dc9mm New Member

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  20. oO_Rogue_Oo

    oO_Rogue_Oo Well-Known Member

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    Thats why media safes have an inner sealed door; look below

    https://www.phoenixsafeusa.com/phoenix-safes/2003