is 125 grain ok?

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by old fart, Apr 29, 2014.

  1. old fart

    old fart New Member

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    i have a ruger service six 357 magnum, it has a small flame cut above the forcing cone. i was told light bullets like 110 grain causes this, i recently found several 158 grain federal soft points but got a great deal on 125 grain remington soft points. will the remington's be ok? or should i just stick with 158 or larger grain? thanks
     
  2. therukh

    therukh New Member

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    The flame that erupts from the cylinder gap on revolvers is akin to a cutting tourch. I can attest to the cutting power of the cylinder flash as I carry a tattoo from a S&W Model 19-3 on my left index finger from a malfunction with .357 mag loads circa 1974. The hotter loads, regardless of weight, will accelerate the cutting on your revolver, so I would shoot it and enjoy it till it needs attention.
     

  3. phildenton

    phildenton New Member

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    I have one of those, for practice I use 125, loaded light-medium pressure 38spc. 125 shoots a bit lower, the fixed sights on these tend to be regulated for 158. using primer with xring rubber bullets will reduce a lot of the cutting, other benefits too, but that's up to you.
     
  4. bluez

    bluez Well-Known Member

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    Rugers tend to be tough customers and I run some of the hottest loads money can buy thru my GP100's
     
  5. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Your going to get gas cutting no matter what you do. Its how it is with revolvers. Light vs heavy bullets isnt going to make any substantial difference.

    Its a main reason i use ruger revolvers they hold up the best to heavy use.
     
  6. old fart

    old fart New Member

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    these are remington umc 125 grain soft points box of 50. i can get several boxes at $15 a box from a guy who has went to an auto and doesn't want them. just wanted to know if they are some of the one's that might cause flame cutting as i was told that the 110 grains were bad for that. the federal 158 grain soft points were $26 a box at my local store so i'm saving some money if the remingtons are ok. thanks
     
  7. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    They are fine. All cartridges regardless of weight cause flame cutting even in semi autos and rifles. Its a normal function of igniting cartridges. Shooting damages guns.

    One type of cartridge isnt any better or worse in realistic terms than another in the same caliber.

    Pressure causes this effect not bullet weight. The more pressure the more wear. Its true of any cartridge. Just inspect for cracking if its a concern to you.
     
  8. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

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    From what I've read (by no means gospel):
    Supposedly flame cutting is worse with the lighter bullets...125s included. That said, the whole "lighter is worse" theory never been explained to me in such a way that it made actual sense. (To be fair, I could just be a bit thick.)
    My opinion:
    A high pressure flame (30K+ PSI) is a high pressure flame. Not really a lot of nuance in the process. Near max pressures are going to cause erosion, regardless of bullet weight. In my admittedly non-expert opinion, I suspect that bullet weights don't make as much differences as say, dropping the pressure with lighter loads. FWIW, my 627 shows evidence of it even with a diet of mild (for .357 spec,) cast reloads. I suspect that the only way to avoid it completely would be to leave it in the safe.

    FWIW, I suspect that even with full strength loads, your Ruger will probably outlast us all.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2014
  9. phildenton

    phildenton New Member

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  10. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    i have to agree with Jon. it's not the bullet weight that matters, but the pressure. hotter loads equal higher pressure so there is the increased wear from flame cutting.

    and every revolver is going to experiance this flame cutting to some degree.
     
  11. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    I would buy the Remington ammo. 125 gr SP ammo usually shoots good. If the Remington's shoot good get some Fiocchi 125 gr ammo. No, you will not get the 1,700 fps advertised on the box, not even with a rifle but they are still faster than all but a few boutique brands.

    I would check the cylinder gap on your pistol. My 357 mag pistols get shot quite a bit, one of them is over 30 years old, my 44 mag is getting close to 30. None of them have a ridge wore in the forcing cone. I have had the forcing cone get loose on a ruger but never any damage.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2014
  12. Mercator

    Mercator New Member

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    Totally true. It also illustrates a much understated point about revolver safety. People think revolvers are naturally safer for the shooter, but they can burn you in a way no modern semi-auto will. There was a guy who sued S&W several years ago. He was shooting a .460 S&W holding his supporting hand to the cylinder gap. His thumb got ripped off clean. But that's another story, pardon the digression.
     
  13. old fart

    old fart New Member

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    the gap is close, with it normal or full lockup a light can barely be seen thru the cone and cylinder area.thanks
     
  14. Hookeye

    Hookeye Active Member

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    FWIW I run 31.5 gr of WW296 with a 180 gr JHP in .44 mag.............you bet your arse even with a hefty crimp there's gonna be flame cutting.

    It only goes so far though. Dunno what % is caused by flame and what % is caused by particle impingement.

    Had a minty 629-3 6" shot maybe 100 or so of my hot 180s and yeah a line appeared. Put it up for sale (wanted a 4" instead ) and some d*ckweed claims the gun has had the crap shot out of it, due to the flame cut. Told him it didn't have it before, but got that in not too many rounds and he flat out in the shop calls me a liar.

    I asked if he ever shot AA9, WW296 or H110 with light bullets at max+ charge and he said no.
    Kinda tore him a new arse after that :)

    Light bullets can cause a problem with certain propellants. They don't have enough "back pressure" to get the powder to burn as well as it should (and why a hefty crimp is needed if one does such loads, and why some loading manuals don't recommend such powders with lighter bullet weights).

    So the problem isn't due to shooting light bullets alone, but light bullets can be part of the flame cut equation.
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2014
  15. Hookeye

    Hookeye Active Member

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    Topstrap cutting isn't the problem, even though it's the more obvious change when shooting such loads. Forcing cone erosion is the biggie.

    My old coworker probably has 10+K through his M29, most of it hot 180 loads............it spits crap everywhere, rather nasty indoors as crud bounces off the partitions. It needs a new bbl bad, and has needed one for some time. Still goes bang and puts them on target but you sure don't want to stand off to the side of him.

    ;)

    Some might condemn him (and others) for shooting such loads.............but the way I look at it, his gun, and yeah it's got serious wear (is fixable) and he's had a freakin' blast (no pun intended) wearing that barrel out!

    It's a .44 magnum, and he shoots it as a magnum.

    Good for him!
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2014