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Why is it that as men generally we consider some rounds as good for kids or our wives and have no issue with them hunting with them but we are not confident in the round for ourselves? with regards to our kids we say they can grow into a larger round... if the round isn't capable for hunting for a "man" why is it capable for a lady, or a kid up until he is able "to grow into something bigger"?
Just something to ponder...
 

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Excellent point. It is probably a macho thing. A .243 works for deer but I have seen magnums out there. Nothing wrong with the old 30-30 if people would hunt instead of target shoot. A friend and his wife both use 257 Roberts.
 
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Doesn't happen with me. My first coyote was taken with my first firearm, a bolt action .22lr with Winchester bulk hollow points. It ran 40 yards or so.
 

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I would tend to agree the whole "macho" bigger is better thing has something to do with it. But i have started to see a trend towards smaller calibers around here now that stories of 243 & 6.5 creedmoor being such flat shooting calibers is so common.

When i first started hunting in the 90's, 7mm, 270, 30-06, & 308 were the most common with 300 magnum starting to become more popular. With the open plains here in North Dakota, the thought seemed to be you needed a big caliber to be able to drop deer at the long ranges you were likely to encounter them at. The first 2 deer i shot were taken at less than 100 yards, one of them at only about 30. I probably could've dropped them with a slingshot.

Bigger may be better but it's not always neccessary.
 

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Very salient point. Apparently, deer and antelope have been grazing on Kevlar fiber, and have become much harder to kill. Yes, I have a .348 Winchester and a .350 Magnum. Apparently they were developed for shooting moose (that were hiding inside your gun safe). But I guess that the venerable "thutty-thutty" is just not up to the job any longer.

I do have a BAR in .243 that does not put me in the trauma ward at the hospital from recoil and will reliably harvest a deer as far as I am comfortable shooting one. That rifle has taken enough deer to fill a good sized truck. If I were huntin bear in Alaska or bison in Wyoming, I'd probably step it up a bit, but for my needs, .243 does just fine. .308 or 30-06 would be as much as I would want. IMHO, if you are not going after an apex predator or Cape Buffalo, we may just be reading too many gun magazines.
 

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When I see a parent buy a .410 for the kid, I can only think "that gauge is what is used in skeet by proficient shooters to give them more of a challenge."

Start the kid with a .20 gauge.
 

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When I have taught my kids and a few others to shoot, I always let them try a few calibers and different firearms so they could get a chance to see where they felt comfortable. None of them ever gravitated to the .22 in handguns. Most went for 9mm or .38, but a couple went for the .45 ACP. Most all acquired a rimfire later, but felt comfortable with a fair centerfire caliber.
 

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270W is the most popular cartridge among the members of our deer lease by far!
Over half of us use a scoped bolt action 270W.

But it was too much recoil for my granddaughter.
So started her out with a 243W shooting the 80 gr bullets.

It deer kills just fine. So,
Hope she stays with it as she grows up.
Only problem I see is using it on big hogs.
 

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if the round isn't capable for hunting for a "man" why is it capable for a lady, or a kid up until he is able "to grow into something bigger"?
I figure the thinking is this, more or less:

  • A cartridge must have sufficient power to take down the game animal (winged, four-legged or two-).
  • A cartridge should be sufficiently usable and tolerable to ensure the person will use it when needed.

In the case of a game cartridge/caliber, I can't see using one that'll give more than a slight chance of survival to the animal. IMO, it's needlessly cruel and unfeeling for the animal, let along likely causing a more-difficult trek to find the animal and pack it out.

But I also appreciate that a given cartridge/caliber needs to be appropriate for the conditions ... even if those conditions are the relative size, strength, stamina, recoil tolerance of the individual, above and beyond what it needs in order to get the animal.

I'm with you, though. First things first. It needs to be sufficient for the purpose. Comfort, if it can be called that, should remain a secondary (even if important) consideration. On this point I try to think of the targeted game animal as one of the predatory types. If it's not reliably brought down, it's all too likely to turn the tables on the hunter.
 

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When I am asked what's the best caliber for self defense, I try to put it in perspective.
I ask the person what they feel would be the best caliber to have in a pen with a 100lb wild boar?
A wild boar or a 250# guy require about the same caliber to be put down efficiently.
 
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