Interested in long range

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by 2hot2handle, Apr 24, 2012.

  1. 2hot2handle

    2hot2handle New Member

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    I've been browsing around this section and have quite a few questions.

    I'm a new shooter, I shoot guns but I wouldn't call myself a marksman by any stretch of the imagination. I really like the thought of long range marksmanship and the challenges that come with it.

    First: Eventually I would love to get out past 700 yards or so just for kicks and giggles. I know that I must first really learn to shoot though. I have no idea about the basics when it comes to true accuracy, everything I know is self taught and from the internet (an excellent source i know ). Where is a good place/books/videos to learn the basics of marksmanship and the terminology associated with it? I'm talking about DOPE etc.

    Second: Obviously I will need a rifle. Unfortunately I am a piss poor person. I am young (19) and only have a part time job right now (looking for more work) . So at what point is it even worth "getting into the game" if you know what I mean? I realize that there is no ceiling on what you can spend, what I am looking for is the basement. I am not worried about having the coolest gun out there because the coolest latest technology will not help with breathing, trigger pull, the reading of the wind etc. I've seen people with the best of the best gear be the worst of the worst performers because they are trying to buy skill.

    Third: I suppose this should go with the second however here we are. Caliber, I do have the tools necessary to reload, but I haven't even tried to do it yet. I'm planning on reloading whatever I shoot but I am sure it would be easier to reload a common caliber instead of something exotic however I leave that up to you to tell me. I am thinking along the lines of .308 or 30-06 correct me if I am out of line, I don't take it personal I'm here to learn.

    Fourth: Scope?

    Fifth: Bipod?

    Sixth: I'm guessing I'm going to be told to buy a 22lr to start out. I already own several firearms, I'd really rather not invest in a bolt .22 and scope etc. but I'll wait and let myself be schooled.

    so in ending thank you for your time and I look forward to your responses and knowledge.
     
  2. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    It sounds like you have a good knowledge base. Next you'll need practice. I would suggest picking up something like a nagant to start with. For somewhere in the range of $100 you will have a great start. With just the basic iron sights you should be able to shoot out to 100 yds no problem and with the mil-surp ammo you can shoot all day. When you're ready to extend things you could have the stock replaced/bedded and get a scope etc and the gun should have no problem getting you out to 300 yds. Beyond that if you really want something with a good 700 yard trajectory its probably gonna get expensive.
     

  3. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    first, practice practice practice. short yardage is great to get better. as you said as you become more proficient you can extend your range.

    second, savage, and marlin make good rifles that are affordable, and can handle shooting accurately.

    third, as far as caliber i might suggest starting off a little smaller, such as a .223, .243. the ammo will be cheaper if reloading or not and thus provide you with more shots, and less recoil. i'm not shy to recoil. but have also learned its alot easier to focus and learn good technique when recoil is not part of the equation. and either of those calibers will be accurate out 4 -500 yards. which even then will still take practice unless you are magical .

    fourth, nikon, leupold, bushnell,burris all make good scopes that are fairly affordable, and will get you the precision you need to attain at least 500 yards. as i mentioned before after you hit that goal you can think about upgrading scopes. the brands i mentioned offer scopes from 3x9x40, to 5x15x40, which will be more than satisfactory and most under are 500 dollars.

    filth, bipod? is your arm borken? for the first few hundred yards i would like to think you could handle the task. this is definatly a shooters preference part. and thus should be considered after you have had some shooting time.

    sixth, you failed to mention what firearms you do own. the basics are pretty universal and should be applied to any caliber. pick one you have and start practicing while saving money for your purchases. if you have a .22 already use it. if you have a 9mm carbine, use it.


    start at 50 yards. after you can reapeatedly put all shots in a nice ragged hole. move to the 100 yard. line then the 125 , and so on.

    hope this was helpful. it seems you have already read the basic marksmanship rules. now you just need to learn to apply them.
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2012
  4. purehavoc

    purehavoc New Member

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    Im not sure what your looking to spend Nagant would be a good cheap starting point . if your looking for something a little newer I might suggest looking at a Savage, Marlin or even a Stevens for around $300 . .223 will probably be the cheapest round you will buy off the shelf unless your reloading yourself . it will still reach out to 500 yards and it will be very challenging to do so with it . They also make the Savage Axis in multiple calibers I have listed below , while its a good gun for the money the trigger is heavy and needs a little bit of work to get it proper , if you have any knowledge of trigger it can be done for about $3 or you can have a smith do it for about $40 , the Sevens and marlin have better triggers IMHO
    22-250 REM
    223 REM
    243 WIN
    25-06 REM
    270 WIN
    30-06 SPFLD
    308 WIN
    7MM-08 REM
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2012
  5. 2hot2handle

    2hot2handle New Member

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    I have the following rifles:
    Mosin Nagant
    AR-15
    10/22
     
  6. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    well you are good to go for awhile.. just practice untill you are confident with your shooting ability. the ar and mosin should be good till 2 - 300yards. you can always add a scope to your ar if you have not yet done so. and the 22 is great for 100 yards and less practice. plus cheaper. once you get the basics down and dont miss much, purchase a rifle. and by that time you may want to consider upping the caliber to one of the ones listed.
     
  7. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    I'd advise considering the 30.06 as a decent L/R caliber.

    Seven huh-huh-hundred yards? Do you have access

    to a range that long?

    One trick pro shooters use is to become extremely

    proficient with a 22LR which is as exact a copy as

    possible as their long-range caliber rifle. Cuts way down

    on expense, and increases expertise.

    You may also want to consider reloading for accuracy purposes.

    QC of your rounds would be unsurpassed, and you could load your

    own choices of gunpowder, projectile, and primer.
     
  8. purehavoc

    purehavoc New Member

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    I like to practice with my .22 also , I just use smaller targets and learn to get proficient with it . once you are knocking out dime sized spots at 50 with the .22 move on up a caliber
     
  9. Intheshop

    Intheshop New Member

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    I love both....30-06 and .308.Have a few of each.Probably go with '06 more when hunting and .308 when target shooting.

    But reason for post was to just say that either of the above 30's....when used in a decent turnbolt....make very fine cast bullet shooters.There "might" be a theoretical advantage to the shorter .308 case?But its all about the practice.

    We shoot at the same dirt berm about 90% of the time....reclaiming the lead.Once the load is sighted in/confirmed on heavy bags/rest....its all about offhand practice.So just give some thought to cast bullets and a 30 cal sumthin.Makes for great practice on the cheap.Shopnut
     
  10. Liflavor

    Liflavor New Member

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    Both are very good rounds out to 700 hundred yards. The is a little difference in the recoil with the two as well as price when you go buy bulk ammo. Personal i suggest you lean to 308 because of recoil that way you can practice long. if your going with tractial long range there is a lot more equipment for that round. Plus its effectiveness is out well pass that range. I try to find a good model 700 rem. And just build from it
     
  11. TLuker

    TLuker Active Member

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    I would just focus on getting the AR dialed in. As already pointed out it's good to 500 yards. Just add a good scope. Look up tips on accurizing it and focus on getting your groups as small as possible.

    Save up for a good .308 or 30-06 while getting your AR dialed in.

    Also figure out what you plan on doing with your long range rifle. There are basically two types of shooting: Hunting and Benchrest. Those are two very different forms of shooting and you would practice differently for each. You would also want different equipment for each.

    This is also just my opinion but I think shooting is all about getting the most out of what ever gun you're shooting. I've dropped deer in their tracks up to 300 yards away with a 1942 Lee Enfield .303 British. I've got guns that are far more accurate but I'm very proud of how accurate I've made that gun. That gun was shooting well over 3 inch groups at 100 yards when I first got it (I was 16) and now it's shoots 1in groups. It's takes skill to dial in a rifle like that and I'm more proud of the 1" groups that I get out of that rifle than the .5" groups I get out of my Remington (the Remington didn't really take much skill to dial in).

    You have three guns that you can work on getting the most out of. Getting those guns dialed in along with your shooting style is how you develop skills, and that's what its all about. I'm not a Mosin fan but some of those rifles have the potential to be very accurate. How much potential does yours have? .22's don't shoot very far but 5 shots in one hole is still impressive even at 50 yards. Yours might be able to do that? Putting shots on target at 500 yards with an AR is also pretty impressive. So I wouldn't worry to much about another rifle anytime soon. Just work on getting the most out of what you have.
     
  12. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    trigger time and practice. you already have three good candidates for practicing. each has their own unique personalities that will do you well for practicing to shoot longer ranges. practice with what you have first, then move up to something else as your experiance increases.

    the 10/22 will be good for learning to shoot small groups at reasonable distances and very cheap to practice with.

    the AR15, same thing, with a decent scope, you can move your distances out further than the 10/22. still one of the cheapest centerfire calibers to practice with.

    the Mosin, with decent ammo and a good scope, this rifle could reach some very long distances. has been proven in the past that it ahs the potential to go accurately at long distances.
     
  13. The_Kid

    The_Kid New Member

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    I had the same idea in mind when I bought my Howa 1500 in 30-06. It came with a scope that is good enough for 700 yards. The only thing I've changed on it was the scope mounts and scope rings... I also reload my own ammo.