Information on a Harrington & Richardson Shotgun

Discussion in 'General Shotgun Discussion' started by Beezer, Nov 2, 2013.

  1. Beezer

    Beezer Member

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    I've picked up a Harrington & Richardson single shot, break top shot gun from my grandfather. I'm having a hard time finding any information about it online.

    On the left side of the gun, there appears to be a date of May 14, 1921 (or 1951), but the writing is worn so its difficult to tell. I've attached a few pictures. Can anyone tell me the age of the gun and how much its worth (ball park)?


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  2. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    Looks like the date is 1901. That may be a patent date, and not the manufacture date. H&R shotguns have been made for a long time. The worn lettering makes it appear that this particular shotgun got abrasive lay cleaned and refinished. Cash value is not usually very high. The value of having a family shotgun that has been passed down is where the real value is. Usually cash values are under $100 or close to that range. That one is definitely older than average and could be worth more in original condition, but refinished ones are usually worth less than original condition ones, even if they are slightly worn.
     

  3. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    If it was mine Donald Trump couldn't buy it. It's not the value of the gun. It's a family heirloom, they are not for sale around here.
     
  4. deg

    deg Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Agreed, the primary reason I bought a gun safe eight years ago was for a Marlin model 29 handed down from my family – it can’t be worth much more than $150 or so.
     
  5. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    No argument here. I have a single shot F.I.E .410, and a Mossberg 185 k-a that I feel the same way about. The .410 will go to my eldest grandchild, (hopefully not too soon, the daughter is only 16), and the 185 is on it's 3rd generation now. the words cold dead hands don't even begin to describe how I feel about those guns.
     
  6. primer1

    primer1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I didn't know those were that old, thanks for posting. Mine was passed down from my grandfather, a .410 pardner he picked up in the later years. It's worth quite a bit to me, although not old or collectible.
     
  7. Beezer

    Beezer Member

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    I had several others passed down as well that have much greater sentimental value (i.e. the gun he got as a retirement gift, his first rifle, etc.). Those won't leave the family.

    This particular gun, from what I can gather, was one that in rough shape when her got it and he thought he could fix it up. Turned out not to be the case. There's not anything special or sentimental about this gun.

    Thanks for all the replies.
     
  8. twoolddogs

    twoolddogs New Member

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    Beezer: You have a Harrington and Richardson Model 1900. There are actually three patent dates stamped on the gun.

    The top line should read PAT. FEB. 20 & 27, 1900 referring two patents Numbers 644,040 and 644,402 granted to Martin Bye and assigned to H & R.

    The second line should read PAT. May 14, 1901 referring to patent 674,086 granted to Andrew Hanson and assigned to H & R.

    The pictured shotgun has been heavily polished and the metal parts refinished as indicated by the purplish color on the receiver and fore-end iron which is what you get when hot bluing a malleable cast iron part in a caustic bluing solution with the heat too low.

    Retail value at auction would probably be in the $50 to $75 range.
     
  9. deg

    deg Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Ok so I have a question, on my Marlin model 21 pump shotgun, it has two different serial numbers on it, one on the receiver and one on the barrel - is that common?
     
  10. phildenton

    phildenton New Member

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    Most likely the barrel was replaced at some point. It happens.
     
  11. deg

    deg Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Yea I was wondering about that; but also, the two numbers are very similar I think only one or two numbers different. I don't have it in front of me but it was something like the number on one ended with an 80 and the other ended with a 90 - something like that.
     
  12. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Could literally just be luck of the draw so to speak. My grandfather's old Syracuse Double has a second set of barrels that he shortened to keep it loaded, broken over the transmission hump in his cruiser as a "silent partner" for nights when he was patrolling alone. I don't remember the number gap between the long and short barrels, but the long matches the receiver, and the short set is within double digits of the receiver S\N. I would have to go down to my uncles apartment to give exact numbers. I can tell you that the shotgun and the second barrel set came from the same smith's shop in Olean NY. The original sales slips are still in one of his files.
     
  13. alsaqr

    alsaqr Well-Known Member Supporter

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