Information on 38 S&W SPECIAL

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by iluv2shoot2, May 31, 2011.

  1. iluv2shoot2

    iluv2shoot2 New Member

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    I inheritated a pistol from my uncle. Attatched are 5 pictures with markings noted. I have researched until frankly I'm more confused than when I started. When was this pistol manufactured? Is the cartridge supposed to be a 38 special, or say 38 S&W special. This and any info will be greatly appreciated. I don't want to sell it, he was my favorite uncle, I would like to know about the history of the gun.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2011
  2. mmszbi

    mmszbi New Member

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    Appears to be a 1960's K frame, others here can be more specific. The designation on the barrel should read 38 S&W Special CTG, with the CTG referring to nothing more than cartridge. It will shoot standard 38 special ammo, DO NOT FIRE +P, it is not rated for it. These were standard issue police and military issue for many years before the advent of the semiauto 9mm, I have one in my safe that was my great uncles service pistol. Great shooters IMO.
    I hope others can go into more detail. It appears the grips has been replaced with a rubber one, the original were a nice wood.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2011

  3. iluv2shoot2

    iluv2shoot2 New Member

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    I knew it was an after market grip. I went thru everything I could find in my uncles house trying to find the original grips but they were not anywhere. My aunt is keeping her eye out for them for me.
     
  4. oldcoptn46

    oldcoptn46 Member Supporter

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    It looks to be a Model 10 pencil barrel. As mmszbi said earlier they were standard issue for a lot of police departments and some military, used to carry one myself as a young air policeman in the Air Force in the late 60s. Good advice on staying away from +p. Regular old 38 specials will work great. I suspect that a supporting member who goes by mesinge2 will be along soon and can tell you when it was made and anything else you need to know about it. Could be worth $250 to $400 depending on how it looks and if it is dinged up or not.

    Pops
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2011
  5. iluv2shoot2

    iluv2shoot2 New Member

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    As the pictures show it's kinda dinged, scratched up. not real bad but it is. It shoots real good. I shoot snakes with it when I'm fishing so it's fairly accurate. I just like to shoot it!
     
  6. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    That is a 5 screw K-frame. Puts it pre 1950 or so. Probably a pre-model 10 called (I believe) the .38 Military and Police model.

    No +P.

    Judging by the condition it does not have a great deal of montary value but probably has high sentimental value. Keep her and shoot her.
     
  7. iluv2shoot2

    iluv2shoot2 New Member

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    You guys are sharp. Any more info would be great!!
     
  8. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    FWIW, Smith & Wesson created the cartridge everyone calls .38 Special. In 1899. It was properly called the Smith & Wesson .38 Military & Police Special. It would be marked on a firearms as 38 S&W Special. Which hacked Colt off to no end- so for a while, THEY made a cartridge called the COLT .38 Special. Identical to the S&W round in every respect EXCEPT had a flat tipped bullet. But that meant that Colt no longer had to put S&W on their guns.

    Do not confuse it with .38 S&W, which was a different round altogether, and it does NOT interchange with .38 Special.

    Your revolver should go down in the history books as the Peacemaker of the 20th century. Carried by hundreds of thousands of law enforcement officers- accurate, reliable, with the right ammo, decent stopping power. The +P stuff is not likely to cause a catastrophic failure of the revolver,but will cause accelerated wear, possible stetching of the frame, and you will learn about problems with "end shake" and "timing". so dont.
     
  9. iluv2shoot2

    iluv2shoot2 New Member

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    I had read that they were two different cartridges, and I wasn't sure I was using the right one. There was a partial box of shells with the gun that were marked 38 SPECIAL that I had been using. They are almost gone and I wanted to make sure what I was using was correct.Can you even accidently fire the wrong cartridge in it?