I'm starting to feel bad about having bought a new Colt revolver.

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by ColtFellow, Nov 9, 2020.

  1. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Guns are tools, not works of art, unless of course they are works of art....
    The best thing to do is when you get a new one is to intentionally put a ding on it and get it over with. I do the same thing with a new truck; I get in the bed with a ball peen hammer and knock a dent in the wheel well then I don't have to worry about it any more. I don't remember every calling Ford and complaining about it when I was done, but I may have, I am getting old and somewhat forgetful.....;)
     
  2. Notrighty

    Notrighty Well-Known Member

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    Typical union worker to dent the truck to make it look like you worked in it . What’s next spray cans full of sweat?
     
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  3. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You really have issues, don't you?
     
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  4. Bigcat

    Bigcat Well-Known Member

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    The Ruger GP100 in 3 inch barrels sure are nice...

    Also OP I hope you did disclose the cosmetic flaw on your sale right?

     
  5. gambler

    gambler Active Member

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    So do you have the e-mail address ?
     
  6. sheepdawg

    sheepdawg Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Interesting comment. Did you vote for Communists, Antifa lovers, race baiters and gun grabbers because your union bosses got into your head. Maybe he has a point.
     
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  7. ellis36

    ellis36 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That is an old "story" going back at least 60 years, told by farmers, taxi drivers, big city commuters, ad infinitum. "Gotta have a dented left front fender before they'll let you merge!":rolleyes:

    ellis
     
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  8. Viking

    Viking Well-Known Member

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    Yes, guns are tools, however when you consider the crude machinery early gun makers had, I consider those early revolvers and .45 autos to be works of art, same with the steam trains, back in those days most of the machines that built these things were run by steam engines running leather belts to a line shaft that usually ran the length of the work shop, the machines that did the work of making parts ran off leather belts coming from those line shafts and the people that made the parts and assembled the final product were craftsmen and as far as I'm concerned they were artists and the work they produced was art. Most everything in these days is done with CNC, it may look good but it didn't come from the hands that made every part, hand fitted.
     
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  9. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I agree. However, if not for mass production, the cost of hand built guns would limit the ability for working class people to own them. For instance, in 1899 to buy a nice Colt Revolver would cost from $15.00-$25.00. That same year a school teacher earned about $250.00 per year. (this is using Texas numbers)

    So, extrapolating from that, if the average wage in the US $40,000/year that means you would pay around $4,000.00 for a nice, hand-made Colt revolver today. Of course, in those days you could buy a cheap revolver for around $2.00, but that would have been the Jennings of the day.
     
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  10. Notrighty

    Notrighty Well-Known Member

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    Lighten up it was just a joke although if I told my father that I intentionally dented my own new truck he would probably say “ son you got issues”
     
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  11. B9er

    B9er Member

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    for almost 100 years, the saying amongst gunsmiths was that Colt never learned to make a DA revolver and smith never learned to make an autoloader. That changed with the M52 and M41 smiths, but it wasn't until they brought out the M and P series that they had a decent fighting autopistol. Colt has been a lost cause since the 80's.
     
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  12. sheepdawg

    sheepdawg Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I beg to differ. The S&W model 39 and it's younger cousins and nephews are among the finest semi automatic pistols ever made. I'd put my S&W 915 against anything you have in your safe and it was one of their cheaper models. I might agree with you on Colt revolvers, they are too delicate.
     
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  13. B9er

    B9er Member

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    the model 39 had much too steep of a feed ramp for reliable feeding with the lightest jhp's, which is what you have to use if you want reliable expansion in flesh. The DA-SA changeover, while not as bad as a Walter, was still pretty poor.
     
  14. sheepdawg

    sheepdawg Well-Known Member Supporter

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    With all due respect I must disagree.
    You must have gotten hold of a lemon. The m/59 started the nickname "wondernine", I seriously doubt a pistol worthy of starting that complimentary a handle would be a POS. The ultimate semi auto in my humble opinion is the Hi Power. FN, and Feg, perhaps the two largest builders of Hi Power type pistols have experimented with a SA/DA version, Feg sold one for years, what pistol system did they use to copy? The S&W m/59. True the 39 and 59 had issues with anything but ball as did every other auto designed in that era but by the time the 2nd gens. came out and more so the 3rd gens. that problem had been remedied. The model 5906 is as fine an all metal 9mm. as just about anything out there. Several reports of pistols with over 50,000 rounds through the pipe with minimal maintenance. Accuracy is on par with any auto built for it's purpose and most important the 5906 and it's 3rd gen. kin go boom when you pull the trigger, it's reliability has never been questioned, ball, JHP, whatever.

    I own an M&P, a 639 and a 915. The 915 would be the keeper.
     
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  15. Mowgli Terry

    Mowgli Terry Well-Known Member

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    Smith&Wesson: I don't do Colt revolvers. I had returned my Smith 28-2 for what may have been problems slightly out of time. The gun was returned not needing repair. I had words with the rep. The guy issued another return label. In the meantime I realized the error was mine. The gun was not sent back Shoots great. This is a current event as in this year.

    It took some time to get around to my gun. Under the current circumstances, I really have no complaints. The company was willing to stand behind their work and product. This is my experience with Smith. Ruger also has great customer service. Two Vaquero were sent back this year. Used guns needing Bubba work seen to. Guns are in current use and work great.
     
  16. jackrich3

    jackrich3 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Cost of said Colt factors into the frustration. Buy a 686+ in 3 or 4”. Can’t believe I just said that.
     
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  17. Donn

    Donn Well-Known Member

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    Picked up a new King Cobra a year or so back. Less than 100 rounds thru it, and there won't be any more till the current shortage abates, (if it ever does). So far, so good. I've got a couple 70's vintage Colts, a Police Positive and Detective Special with the traditional rich blue finish. I know that stainless steel is a more practical finish, but the old ones sure look a lot nicer IMHO. Once ammo's available, (and affordable), again, I'll give this weapon a good workout, render a final verdict then.
     
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  18. AgedWarrior

    AgedWarrior Well-Known Member

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    Blued steel looks good! I like stainless, and modern finishes are practical and enduring, but blued steel I like the most!
     
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  19. Moenie

    Moenie New Member

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    Whenever I do something to the finish of a gun, I always test on an area that is not exposed. On revolvers I normally remove the grips and test on the grip frame. No matter if it turns out bad, the grip will cover it.
     
  20. cigarman454

    cigarman454 New Member

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    I really hate to hear that. I haven't been a colt fan for years I've had some of there sub par firearms myself but was hoping they have turned that around. I guess I'll continue to stay away.