im probably gonna get flamed for this but here goes...

Discussion in 'Semi-Auto Handguns' started by marlin-owner, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. marlin-owner

    marlin-owner New Member

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    i traded my .22 for a 9mm bryco jenning 9mm. before i did it i looked it up and saw all the poor reviews. i took it out to the range yesterday and to my suprise it did not explode. it fired every time i pulled the trigger. and was pretty acurate as well. the only issue i had was the rear end of the firing pin was poking out of the back to much, to let you know its live. so i took a pair of needle nose and snipped it at the base. broke out a grinder and grinded the nub left to flat. that just leaves the guide rod and the firing pin on the front side, anyways i adjusted to clip by pinching the top of the clip a tiny but closer so it can feed easier. all in all it seems worth my .22 i traded for it. any opinions? i would prefer people who have either owned or fired it to respond. thanks! :)
     
  2. Zodiac131911

    Zodiac131911 New Member

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    I watched a .380 explode in my brothers face. Just be careful the slide hung up a little and exposed the case and it still fired letting the case explode on him.
     

  3. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    No flame if the trade resulted in you getting a better handgun.

    (You really had such a cheap .22?)
     
  4. vincent

    vincent New Member

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    As long as you're happy with it then that's all that really matters, right?
     
  5. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Recommendation. Instead of snipping any parts in the future, if you must do home modifications for whatever purposes, desire, aesthetics, functionality, ergonomics, invest in a good dual grit whet stone and slowly hone down small parts by hand.

    I don't know if its been proven, but I feel like snipping can put undue areas on a given part and make the metal brittle and weak, possibly also causing small minute cracks leading to the same.

    Its my preference and my opinion.

    And yeah, if it works for you and your happy, roll with it.
     
  6. Sonic82

    Sonic82 New Member

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    They've got a good deal on one, $30 Gunsamerica...$10 shipping though...maybe it's not such a good deal.
     
  7. jamesb

    jamesb New Member

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  8. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    I knew a kid who was very happy with his 9mm bryco. I am not sure i ever actually saw him fire it, though. If you like it, then enjoy it; if it embarasses you, stand by somebody with a hipoint. :D

    Seriously, if you decide to get something "better" or more generally accepted as "reliable", you could probably pick up a Ruger P95 for under $300, barely used. That is a solid, reliable handgun for a low price (not the prettiest piece though, IMO).
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2012
  9. Sonic82

    Sonic82 New Member

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    I never understood why people think the P95 isn't a nice looking piece, I think they look great.

    And frankly, I wouldn't shoot a 9mm Bryco. Some things you shouldn't go cheap on, firearms are one of them. Firearms can be dangerous if not properly constructed. Do you think SIG, Glock and S&W would put as much time and effort in R & D if you could just bang them out and sell them for less than $200? A 9mm can cause you alot of injury.... and by the way, you hold handguns 2 feet from your face....just sayin'.
     
  10. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I would fear a well trained and practiced shooter with a high-point, much more than an occasional shooter with a Kimber.
     
  11. nccinstaller

    nccinstaller New Member

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    Yeah cause if the hi point failed to go bang he could give you a concussion by hitting you in the head with it lol lol. Just kidding lol
     
  12. Sonic82

    Sonic82 New Member

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    The shooter isn't the issue...this is.

    From Wikipedia;

    Bryco Arms declared bankruptcy in 2003 as a result of losing a lawsuit filed in Oakland, California and which resulted in a jury award of a record $24 million judgment against Bryco Arms. The lawsuit stemmed from an injury to a then 7-year old boy named Brandon Maxfield received from a 20-year old family friend who was attempting to unload the 380 ACP version of the Bryco Arms Model 38. The gun discharged while the 20-year old was attempting to clear the chamber, the gun inadvertently pointed at Maxfield.[1] The ensuing negligent discharge paralyzed Brandon Maxfield from the neck down. The plaintiffs claimed that due to a design defect, the gun had a cartridge feed problem, made evident when the safety was on and the user pulled back the slide to check the chamber or load a cartridge into the chamber. Rather than re-design the gun to correct the jamming problem, the design of the gun was altered to require that the safety be placed in the fire position when checking the chamber or chambering a cartridge, which hid the problem from the user.
     
  13. marlin-owner

    marlin-owner New Member

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    i cant check the chamber when the safety is on. idk why but thats how it is. the slide locks into place when the safety is on. is that one of the remodeled ones? and i traded a broken marlin 795 for it. the marlin was a piece... it jammed every clip when clean and when it was dirty it plain out would not fire. but the bryco seems like a good deal because it goes boom every time. they are made for fmj standard velocity. i fired hollow points +P and it functioned without a jam...
     
  14. marlin-owner

    marlin-owner New Member

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    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2RxrBAjNW4]Shooting Bryco Jennings 9mm - YouTube[/ame]


    this is what mine did. look at his armed pin on the rear of the slide. he did the same thing i did. and thats how mine functioned. seems like people have more problems with the 380's