Illuminated vs non Illuminated

Discussion in 'Optics & Mounts' started by Taylor Self, Jul 8, 2020.

  1. Taylor Self

    Taylor Self New Member

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    I am in the market for a new scope for a 6.5 grendel I’m building. It will mainly be used for deer hunting in relatively open fields. I would also like to use it to shoot out to about 400 to 500 yards at steel just for fun, nothing competitive. For these applications what are y’all’s opinions on illuminated vs non illuminated reticles?
     
  2. Ghost1958

    Ghost1958 Well-Known Member

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    Etched reticle with illumination.
     
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  3. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have a Trijicon with a green dot on the intersection of the crosshairs, it is a great hunting scope.
     
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  4. Shopfox

    Shopfox Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you think you need illumination for hunting at dusk/dawn, you're also likely having trouble ID'ing your target, or seeing beyond it - at which point, you shouldn't even be shooting.

    That said, if you're using it in normal light just to get on a moving target a little faster, I can see the merit.

    All things said, I generally opt out of illumination. Extra weight, extra complexity, extra cost, and minimal benefit for me.
     
  5. 7.62 Man

    7.62 Man Well-Known Member

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    I try to not buy illuminated scopes because with my bad eyes(reason for needing a scope) in low light hunting situations I can't see my prey or the area around it with the scope lit. Besides of the need for batteries at the wrong times, I figure I just leave them shut off when I'm hunting.
     
  6. PANDEMIC

    PANDEMIC Well-Known Member

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    I agree with shopfox, I used an Illumination scope once at night in pitch black for hog hunting. And I can't even see what I'm aiming at. Turning the brightness down helps a lot, but a rifle scope is what I really needed the most in that situation.

    An Illumination scope imho Is good for range use, self/home defense or day hunting. Night hunting with one works but the brightness of the reticle would need to be very low (if thats an option) especially when its pitch black.
     
  7. Mercator

    Mercator Well-Known Member

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    You want an illuminated center dot.
     
  8. Shopfox

    Shopfox Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I just got back from the range. The illuminated center dot on my Weaver Super Slam was dead. Cross hairs were good to go though.
     
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  9. PaBushMan

    PaBushMan Well-Known Member

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    I had an illuminated red dot scope on my crossbow. Cost me a deer because the battery died. I forgot to turn it off the day before. I now have a scope on it with cross hairs for 25 35 45 and 55 yards. No batteries to worry about.
     
  10. Taylor Self

    Taylor Self New Member

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    Thank you all for the input. What are everyone’s opinions on exposed turret rifle scopes for the uses listed above?
     
  11. PaBushMan

    PaBushMan Well-Known Member

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    i like them. No coin to dig for to turn. Also get one with the BDC reticle for long distance shooting. It takes some practice to learn where each graduation hits at the yardages. But a lot of fun learning them. :D
     
  12. woodlander

    woodlander Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    One more thing that needs batteries.
     
  13. Shopfox

    Shopfox Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I like the exposed turrets. They make adjusting the scope easy. I fiddle with changing scopes, changing mounts, re-zeroing, and trying different hand loads. It makes it quick and easy to "dial in". If you're the "set it and forget it type", I'd lean traditional capped turrets.
     
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  14. PaBushMan

    PaBushMan Well-Known Member

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    Mill dot i ment. Sorry for any confusion.
     
  15. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Well-Known Member

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    If you're hunting in the dark,you should really be using Night vision optics,not a daytime scope. That's a good way to either injure an animal,or shoot something or someone because you can't see well enough to know what your aiming at.

    Good,quality scopes usually have very good illumination on them that can be used to aid daytime or low light shooting. They allow the shooter/hunter to clearly see the reticle when the background blocks the reticle from being used properly.

    There's a big difference in the quality of an illuminated reticle on a $1000+ scope,and the cheap Chinese crap that a lot of you guy's buy.
    Kinda like the difference in an Aimpoint red dot sight,and those $50 - $100 pieces of crap that most guy's put on their guns.

    You get what you pay for!
     
  16. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Well-Known Member

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    Exposed turrets are great for someone that actually uses them,but then it needs to be a high quality scope that has excellent tracking. If the scope doesn't track correctly,then your shots will be way off from the intended placement that you're wanting to put the shot.
    The turret's also need to be very tactile so that they don't get turned accidentally if the scope brushes against something while carrying/moving the firearm.
    Many scopes are going to locking turret's which solves the accidental turret movement.

    Most hunter's don't need exposed turret scopes. Rarely does anyone shoot at game past 300 yards,and with most centerfire cartridges that are legal for big game hunting,all a hunter needs to do is adjust his aiming point high on the shoulder for the shot to be lethal on game such as deer,elk,moose,etc.
     
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  17. jigs-n-fixture

    jigs-n-fixture Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Exposed turrets would be useless on a hunting rifle in 6.5 Grendel, in nearly all situations. Typically in a hunting situation, game appears at random locations and distances. You don’t have time to adjust the scope. You need to learn your scope and learn to dope it visually in a moment.

    If you site it at 200-yds, you would be within 3-inches from point blank to 200, and only ten inches low at 300. Which would make it pretty quick to learn the holds on.

    As to a scope recommendation, I’d look at a 1.5 to 6 power with a BDC reticle. The reticle would let you learn the holdovers pretty quickly.
     
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  18. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My Trijicon with green dot does not require batteries.
     
  19. PANDEMIC

    PANDEMIC Well-Known Member

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    I understand and I'm happy with my budget daytime scope that I have but you are correct a Nightvision optic would be more suitable for night hunting. But I was hunting on my own property and so no one was there but the hogs I was scouting. I had a feeder there that had a green LED light with motion sensors that turned on when it detected any movement near by so I could still see the hogs. Just not as good because I was using a daytime scope, but I could still see them and take the shot if needed. Just the brightness of the reticle needed to be very low otherwise it blocks off the backround behind the reticle. I just never fired my weapon at the time becuase the hog I was aiming at would not stand still even for a split second long enough for me to take the shot.

    But I do plan on possibly getting a much better quality scope, maybe one that doesn't use batteries lol. But this budget scope is all I have on hand atm and it works fine for day use. I haven't really done night hunting in a while anyways. So I'm not to big in a rush to upgrade my scope just yet.
     
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  20. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A "daytime" scopes works well to shoot hogs if you have someone to keep the spotlight on the hog(s).