if you want to know if you have a rifle or a shotgun...

Discussion in 'General Shotgun Discussion' started by bobski, Jul 26, 2014.

  1. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

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    tell us how you pull your trigger to fire.

    do you exhale and slowly squeeze until it goes off and surprises you...

    or do you slap your trigger back?
     
  2. Shoobee

    Shoobee New Member

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    Bobski, my personal view is that it all depends on the situation.

    With a shotgun on a flying bird, you don't have time to squeeze, you need to pull the trigger fast.

    But with a shotgun on a stationery buck, you would squeeze.

    Same is true of a pistol or a rifle as well -- it all depends on what the target is doing.
     

  3. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

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    that is the purpose of this thread. many here think they have shotguns, but dont know the difference on how to shoot them.
     
  4. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Ummmm..... pass shooting doves, I swing thru the bird, slapping the trigger as my bead passes the bird.

    Shooting at a turkey, I am patiently holding rock steady, not moving- waiting for Mr. Jake to take about 3 more steps. The load of #4 shot will be delivered with no lead.

    Both shots are from the same smoothbore Fox Sterlingworth SxS. :confused:
     
  5. Shoobee

    Shoobee New Member

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    Yet another extremely good example of both.

    Holding and squeezing is for carefully aimed fire.

    Pulling is for extremely fast fire.

    Same is true of a running shot on a buck with a rifle versus a shot on a standing buck.

    Same is true with a pistol shot against an assailant who is pointing his gun at you. All depends.

    There are times when holding and squeezing will make you miss or get you killed.
     
  6. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

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    bingo.........many hd owners dont know the differences.
     
  7. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

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    a shotgun can be a rifle, but a rifle cant be a shotgun.
     
  8. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    You can learn to squeeze the trigger while shooting at moving game. When I shoot skeet the only time I slap the trigger is on station #8. I have shot a buck 8 times with an sks before he got across a logging path. I was not slapping the trigger, every shot hit the deer in the neck, shoulder and lungs. Anyone who says I need to learn to shoot is deluded or just a troublemaker.

    Anyone who can hit a running deer 8 times in less than a second is doing some fine shooting.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2014
  9. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'll agree with the last JD in that it is good shooting, but, if you used a bigger caliber you wouldn't need so many rounds. Let me guess, dog hunt? Man I miss those.

    Up here in the North, (relax, I'm still a Son of Dixie at heart, even if my azz is in the land of the carpet baggers ;) we tend to use shotguns with slugs and bigger rifles as the whitetail deer up here are a little larger than they are down there. My first deer, taken on public land near Onslow county NC, was about the same size as my wife's lab, and he was a 4 pointer. My smallest deer up here was about the size of a great dane, and I was still checking for spots before I fired on her.

    Like I said, not dissing you or Dixie. I love my SKS as well, but it just ain't a good deer rifle in the northern woods.

    As to the OP, I have to answer as others did. It depends on what I am shooting. Stationary target, turkey, deer, etc. Deep breath, slow squeeze, let it out, and the trigger break is a surprise. Moving target, clays, pheasant, quail, rabbit, etc. swing, lead, and slap.
     
  10. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    shot placement, proper ammo for the intended game and staying within the limits of the cartridge you are using will put almost anything on the ground and then in the freezer.

    if those three conditions are not met while hunting, then it's highly likely that a person is going to either wound or miss the animal. shot placement? need to be able to hit where you're aiming and shooting the right area for quick and humane kill. if someone can't do this, they need to practice on paper more before trying it out on game animals. proper ammo? use ammo made for the game you are hunting. seems pretty straightforward to me and fairly simple. most ammunition makers list recommendations of what is best for which type of game you're hunting. cartridge limitations? learning a bit about simple ballistics will give you a pretty good idea as to the limitations of a cartridge.

    it's the unethical hunter that steps outside those boundaries and lays blame on his equipment for failing to achieve a quick and humane kill, instead of facing the fact that it was his failing to do his job as a hunter properly.
     
  11. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    I have shared my experiences over and over with the 7.62x39 and what I have seen other shooters experience with a 5.56x45. Yet, I get freight trained and insulted over and over. I have been told I need shooting lessons, had my intelligence insulted when I mention a larger caliber such as a 30/06 or a 270 for deer hunting. I was shooting a 7.62x39 before most of these people were born. They think modern ammo is so much better or whatever. A soft point is a soft point, not much as changed in the past 30 years or so. The premium bonded bullets do give the shooter a marginal edge but it is not like they have reinvented the wheel.
     
  12. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

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    ask a couple million japs in ww2 what they thought of 30-06.
     
  13. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Most of the surviving ones would tell you that it worked great as a replacent round for their Type 99s. ;)
     
  14. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Not trying to insult you or freight train you by what I posted earlier. That was not my intent, and I am sorry if it was taken that way.

    I am not trying to lessen the 7.62 X 39. it is a good intermediate cartridge that was designed to work best at shorter ranges than the .30-06, and it fires (in most cases) a lighter bullet. I am not saying it will not do the job with the right ammo and the right shooter behind the trigger. that is true with any caliber. Folks have dropped deer with .22 LR firearms in the past, but that doesn't mean that I would want to try it.

    Also keep in mind that the game laws where I hunt are different than the ones in NC. In NY, you are limited to 6 rounds in a semi-auto long gun that is centerfire while big game hunting. an SKS holds 10. In PA, you may not use any semi-auto firearm to hunt big game. Once again, the SKS is not an option for me. My best bet would be to convert a 93 Mauser action and Mag to work with an aftermarket sporter barrel in 7.62 X 39. In that case, I'll save the cash and use my 1916 Spanish Short rifle as it is as a deer gun. At least it would be legal.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2014
  15. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    there are a lot of hunters who wound or miss deer with larger magnum calibers, because they think a larger or magnum cartridge type rifle is a substitute for accurate shot placement. many of them think that they can automatically increase their shooting distances simply going to a larger caliber. going to a larger caliber doesn't make you any more accurate at increased distances. practice does. lots of practice.

    accurate shot placement, proper ammo selection for the intended game you are hunting and staying within the limitations of the cartridge you have chosen to hunt with puts an animal on the ground quickly and humanely.

    i have a firm belief that many people need more practice before heading out hunting. a couple of rounds per year, sighting in a rifle is not acceptable.
     
  16. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    No argument here Brother. I have had to help track other folk's screw ups more than once, and in almost every case the last ime they fired their rifle, shotgun, etc. was at the range to sight it in. Before that, it is usually last season some time. had one guy ask me: "You mean it wasn't on after the guy at Dick's bore sighted it?"

    It was one of the few times in my life that I have considered shoving a Benelli up someone's azz. I still wish he had missed that doe clean instead gut shooting her. :mad:
     
  17. Gonzilla

    Gonzilla Active Member

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    The whole purpose of IPSC training is to be be able to get "clean" trigger release. It is possible to be smooth & fast. Same w a rifle. Hitting a moving target consistently is challenging. If you can slap a trigger straight back w/o messing up sight picture - more power to ya.

    I agree w John Deer - the only time I slap the trigger in skeet is on station 8 and the mechanical triggers on my 3200 are so damn smooth, it's not much of one. I shoot w a gent whose high end shotgun has 3.5lb pull. It's single malt smooth.

    Hunting - fastest thing I've ever tried to hit was woodcock - small bird - lives in dense thickets and makes a really unique noise when flushed. Very fast & very tasty. ;)
     
  18. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

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    At "pull" I hold my breath, like with a rifle or handgun. Is that wrong?
     
  19. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

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    if youre shooting shot it is.
     
  20. Virginian

    Virginian Active Member

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    I don't know what I do. When I hear someone rack a pump I'm so terrified my mind goes blank. :eek: