If I had to rely on Gunsmithing...

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing Forum' started by danf_fl, Aug 12, 2010.

  1. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    ...I would starve.
    A Heritage Arms Rough Rider, 9" barrel, convertible 22LR and 22Mag.

    A friend wanted to know if I would be interested in buying it, but he said it needed to be repaired. Looked at it. A little surface rust, cylinder stop spring broke, "hand" to rotate cylinder would only work if revolver was pointed down. So, yours truly thought, "Replace springs, fix appearance, sell it and make a profit." Such was not the case.

    Cylinder stop spring was an easy replacement. Yeah, things are going great so far. Now let's go after the "hand" spring. Wait, the cams that move the cylinder don't look quite right. Darn, they're broken. Okay, buy another unit and hope the spring is already installed. Check website for parts. Good, the piece is in stock (did not see that the earlier serial number (mine) was discontinued). Ordered. Received, but what I received was the same as the broken and the cylinder will not rotate with the new "hand". Someone else tried the same steps and broke their replacement hand. Now, do I order replacement cylinders or work with what I have? Cost was driving this fine deal out of the question. Ended up reshaping a second ordered "hand" with trial fittings, and range checkout. Functionally, now, everything works as it should. Too many hours invested so far... still have to work on appearance. Sand and "Krylon" finished.

    Went back to original owner and asked the questions I should of asked in the first place. Yes, the gun was taken to another smith, yes, the gun was declared "unrepairable". Total cost to me was my purchase price, parts costs, shipping costs, over 15 hours of file, fit, replace, sand, paint.

    This just became one of my "favorites", and won't be sold for a while.
     
  2. willshoum

    willshoum New Member

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    Starving Gun Smith

    Can you put a price on the knowledge that you gained by taking on this project. You brought this pistol back from the dead. :eek::)
     

  3. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Active Member

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    Been there, done that, got the T shirt Dan! I know how you feel.
     
  4. amoroque

    amoroque New Member

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    Man, friends......right?

    Sold it to you saying it needed to be repaired, then later told you that it was taken to another gunsmith and deemed unrepairable?

    At least you have a new favorite firearm.
     
  5. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Paperweight. :(
     
  6. billdeserthills

    billdeserthills New Member

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    I'm a locksmith, not a "gunsmith", so although I have repaired many firearms, I like to start like this. Broken gun, let's see is it still in production? Yes, let's just mail it back to it's Daddy, The Heritage factory, where they will kindly fix their POS gun for No Charge, Job Done!
     
  7. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    I like to try things. I got it to function, look nice, and I learned a lot. I am not complaining (won't do any good). But I hope others learn from my mistakes.

    Now on to the next project. A Remington Model 12C that someone's father-in-law got from his dad and has been broken for over 75 years. This one is for learning.

    The mill and lathe are already set up.
     
  8. Ruzai

    Ruzai New Member

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    I know what you mean man, glad you arent too sore over it. Sometimes being burned is the only way to learn from our mistakes. At least now you can say you have experience on the gun repair subject.
    I had a similar experience but didnt get the gun from a friend.
    I bought an old revolver that is no longer in production and I seem to have a knack for picking out that odd discontinued gun that needs work. I knew it needed work when I got it, but I didnt realize how much it actually needed. :rolleyes: I need new springs in every part of the gun, since it sat in an old cabinet for years, and it needs an endshake washer for the cylinder, not to mention a good coating once all the scratches and corners are rounded off and everything functions the way it ought to.
    I like a challenge on an old gun but after I bought it and did some research on it I found out that even when it was produced it was pretty much just above the line of "unrepairable". I'm going to fix it because its my only 44 magnum handgun and I dont like to quit on things half way though.
     
    SWSinTN likes this.
  9. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Thanks. Jim Clark is not too far from you, is he? (I used to live in Haughton).

    The challenge sometimes is worth it. I would not advise anyone to try it without any experience, but in my normal job, I seem to be the one reviving old equipment that has been broken for years.

    (Makes one wonder how many other "unrepairables" are around.)
     
  10. Ruzai

    Ruzai New Member

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    Yeah, he's roughly about an hour away from where I live. I plan on seeing if I can call him and have a visit with him if I can.
    As an odd twist of fate one of my customer's sent me a derringer made by the same company as the afore mentioned revolver. It looks pretty bad off cosmeticly but it works for what the guy wants, he just needed me to order and fit some good grips to it for him.
     
  11. big shrek

    big shrek Well-Known Member

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    That's what can get a fella into all sorts of fun trouble :)

    On the upside, you learn things you couldn't possibly ever learn any other way!!