I want to get into reloading what is the better press to start with?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by mike10801, Jan 25, 2012.

  1. mike10801

    mike10801 New Member

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    I want to get into reloading what is the better press to start with a lee loadmaster or lee turret, this is mainly going to be used for mostly pistol rounds ranging from 380 to 50ae so there will be a lot or die changings for the diff calibers. Also a few rifle rounds mainly 223 and 7.62 maybe 7mm. I only shot about 250-350 rounds a month but need to be able to work quick and efficient? Any suggestions. And of course like anything else cost is a factor.
     
  2. Centaur1

    Centaur1 New Member

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    Lyman T-Mag turret press is a great press. You can get one from Bass Pro Shop for $145 which is the same price as a Rockchucker. The T-mag is built very sturdy whereas the Lee is a lightweight press. Since I load only cast bullets in my handguns, I use a seperate press to expand the case mouths. This allows me to keep dies from 3 calibers mounted on the turret, .380 acp, .38 special, and 9mm. It's nice to have these dies always mounted and adjusted properly. Something else that I wouldn't do without is a hand priming tool, mine is the one from Hornady. It is so much easier to use than a press mounted attachment, and I can prime cases while sitting with the family instead of being alone out in the garage.
     

  3. tiberius10721

    tiberius10721 New Member

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    Midway has the lee turret press for 112 dollars. I have used this press for 12 years and am very happy with it. There are 60 reviews for it at midway USA of actual users. This is a very sturdy piece of equipment.
     
  4. Sport45

    Sport45 New Member

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    The Lee Classic Turret is a great press at a good price. Take off the auto-index parts and it's a simple single stage turret that is stout enough to resize anything short of .50bmg. It's a good starter press that qualifies as a lifetime keeper as well.

    The loadmaster is a so-so progressive from what I've read, but I haven't ever used one. When you are ready to take the step to progressive I suggest a Dillon 550b or a Hornady LnL. I have the Dillon, but might buy the Hornady if I was starting over.
     
  5. noylj

    noylj Member

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    I would get the Lee Classic Turret.
    If you need more press later, get the Hornady L-N-L progressive and not the Lee progressives--unless you are a tinkerer and like a challenge.
     
  6. ktmboyz

    ktmboyz New Member

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    Have you read the sticky above? Tango did a great write up on this topic a few years ago and is really a great read for someone looking to get into reloading.
     
  7. mike10801

    mike10801 New Member

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  8. scottybaccus

    scottybaccus New Member

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    Dillon Square Deal B (RL550B). Buy the full kit and never look back. Excellent customer service, warranty and support. Versatile, tough, as relaible as my 1911. Lot's of upgrade possibilities when you get ready for additional calibers or features.
     
  9. ktmboyz

    ktmboyz New Member

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    When you first click on the reloading section ( or any for that matter ) at the top are common topics and are placed there permanently.
     
  10. 1hole

    1hole New Member

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    "..the Lee is a lightweight press."

    Saying 'the Lee' isn't very helpful, they make quite a few presses and two are cast iron and steel, both are quite 'heavy' if that matters.

    Noobs have a lot to learn, that learning can be made much more difficult by starting on a progressive press. Get the Lee Classic (iron)Turret instead and use it in the single stage mode until you learn the basics of reloading very well. Then get die holder heads for each caliber you want to load for and use the auto-indexing feature to speed things up. If you want a progressive later you'll have enough personal hands-on experience to make your own correct choice.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2012
  11. h8dirt

    h8dirt New Member

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    This is probably where you will eventually end up anyway. Save the time and money -- take the plunge. You won't regret it.
     
  12. cottontop

    cottontop Guest

    The RCBS Rockchucker is probably the best all around and strongest single stage press available, unless one wants to spend a lot more money. You can usually find a used one (it is almost impossible to wear one out) on ebay for under $100.
    cottontop
     
  13. bowguy

    bowguy New Member

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    Look at the Forster Co-Ax Press and the RCBS RockChucker both are excellent and will last. Purchasing one of these you won't be looking for another in a few years.
     
  14. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    I have a couple of RCSB Rockchuckers and a Redding. The Redding is pretty cool.
     
  15. Mason609

    Mason609 New Member

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    I was thinking about getting into reloading, and yes I have read the sticky, but I still have question...

    I shoot common rounds- .22LR, 9mm, .38 special, .45ACP as well as 5.56mm. I also shoot 10mm (which is not common in my area). I know I can get pretty good deals on .22LR, 9mm and 5.56mm, but 10mm and .45ACP can get pricey. So, would reloading be worth it in the long run? I shoot once a month, due to the cost of ammo. At one point, I used to go once a week, and would really like to go back to that. My handgun accuracy is diminishing.
     
  16. oldpapps

    oldpapps New Member

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    Mr 609,
    In my experience the thought of saving a little money by rolling your own is appealing. Unfortunately, you will not reduce your cash out lay. Yes, depending upon what you load, you will recoup the costs of setup in little time. That is the good part. The better part is that you will begin to understand the workings of your various loadings and shoot better loads that you tailor to your weapons and shoot a lot more.
    But this takes time, thought and labor on your part. If you determine that reloading is not for you, you may recoup a great deal of your out lay by selling your stuff off.

    In short, it is cheaper per loaded round to reload. Your quality reloads are better than those punched out by some machine with questionable quality control. If you go out and rattle off 4 or 5 hundred rounds in an afternoon and don't think to pick up your brass, your savings will go a way and you will have a lot of work to do.

    You can reload 22 RF, it is not worth the effort in my mind. I reload 9s(not for me-for my brother), 45s (44s), (I don't load 10MM but I do 40cals) and when using lead bullets, the cost to me is all but the same and that is low. I gave up on 38s long ago. My 223/5.56s, 308/7.62s, 30.06s and 375s are IMHO much better than factory loads and one heck of a lot cheaper.
     
  17. 1hole

    1hole New Member

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    "RCBS Rockchucker is probably the best all around and strongest single stage press available,"

    That's an over statement, IMHO; I've used an RC since '87 and strongly disagree with both premises. It's an okay press but I can see no way it's any better or stronger than others in it's class, including Lee's Classic Cast. IF the CC had been available when I got my RC, THAT'S what I would have, even if it had cost more.
     
  18. bowguy

    bowguy New Member

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    The basic Rock Chucker of '87 does not compare to the ones produced today. Like most items, you get what you pay for.

    As for the quality of todays factory ammunition and talking about premium not cheap or third-world surplus ammo, it surprisingly good. I will go so far as to say it those who reload only using basic steps would be better off with quality factory rounds. Not to say those that are dedicated to producing the best reloaded rounds possible and understand the correct method to produce their ammo based on thier individual firearms can reach the potential of themselves and at times their firearms. Reloading can be tedious as well as demanding but still fun.
     
  19. Viking

    Viking Active Member

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    I have a RCBS Jr. that's over 30 years old. It's allowed me to do a lot of shooting that I couldn't do if I had to buy factory ammo.
     
  20. cottontop

    cottontop Guest

    Rcbs



    I know you are quoting me and for some reason you have singled me out and continue to try to discredit me and make me look foolish. This is not the first time. I realize that I, like most other middle aged/old guys are very strongly opinionated when it comes to politics and guns. Too many of us believe in too many gun and shooting myths. So, I like many others who post on shooting forums will make statements that are largely opinion and can't really be proven.
    That being said, I have taken various Lee products to gun shows and gun shops w/ the express purpose of trying to trade them for RCBS products. Dealers tell me that Lee doesn't even come close to RCBS in quality and resale value, and they refuse to even consider a trade. They may or may not be right. I personally own many Lee products and I like them very much and use them. I have nothing against Lee. But, when it all comes out in the wash, I do prefer RCBS.
    cottontop